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NEWS
February 9, 1994 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The leader of Bosnia's Croats stepped down Tuesday in a move aimed at improving their position in peace negotiations and minimizing criticism of Croatia's efforts to support ethnic kin in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Stung by battlefield losses and the breakdown of an alliance between Bosnian Croats and Muslims, Mate Boban resigned as president of the self-proclaimed republic of Herzeg-Bosna.
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NEWS
February 9, 1994 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The leader of Bosnia's Croats stepped down Tuesday in a move aimed at improving their position in peace negotiations and minimizing criticism of Croatia's efforts to support ethnic kin in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Stung by battlefield losses and the breakdown of an alliance between Bosnian Croats and Muslims, Mate Boban resigned as president of the self-proclaimed republic of Herzeg-Bosna.
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NEWS
May 28, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Encouraged by the Bosnian Serbs' purported independence and Western reluctance to preserve the republic, the Bosnian Croats' leader said Thursday that he has no choice but to create and protect his own separate state. Self-styled president Mate Boban has adopted a ruthless pragmatism in laying claim to most Bosnian territory not yet under Serbian rebel control and abandoning Muslim allies he blames for losing the rest of the republic.
NEWS
May 28, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Encouraged by the Bosnian Serbs' purported independence and Western reluctance to preserve the republic, the Bosnian Croats' leader said Thursday that he has no choice but to create and protect his own separate state. Self-styled president Mate Boban has adopted a ruthless pragmatism in laying claim to most Bosnian territory not yet under Serbian rebel control and abandoning Muslim allies he blames for losing the rest of the republic.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | Associated Press
International mediators said the top leaders of Bosnia-Herzegovina's warring ethnic factions agreed Wednesday to attend a new round of peace talks and stay until a settlement is reached. There was no immediate confirmation from leaders of the war-torn republic's Serbs, Croats and Muslims that they have accepted the invitation to the Geneva talks, due to begin Friday. But a spokesman for the mediators--U.N.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
International mediators Tuesday cited progress in long-stalled Bosnian peace negotiations after the warring Balkan leaders talked for the first time in more than six months and agreed to meet again today. Details of the talks remained wrapped in secrecy as all sides appeared determined to keep the peace process going.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | From Reuters
Muslim forces pounded Croats in Novi Travnik with artillery shells as a brush-fire war between the former allies in central Bosnia grew Wednesday. The town is only four miles south of Travnik, which Muslims captured from Croats last weekend in a rout that cost hundreds of lives and triggered an exodus of terrified civilians. The Bosnian Croat leader, Mate Boban, accused Muslims of killing or expelling thousands of Croats during the fighting and appealed to nearby Croatia for help.
NEWS
January 6, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
International mediators on Tuesday headed to a key meeting with hard-line Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic in a last-ditch push to bring peace to Bosnia-Herzegovina. The mediators, Cyrus R. Vance and Lord Owen, traveled to Belgrade, the Serbian and federal Yugoslav capital, for a meeting today with Milosevic. He is the man most blamed for fomenting the war in Bosnia, and he has considerable influence over Bosnian Serbs.
NEWS
October 23, 1993 | From Reuters
Rebel Muslim leader Fikret Abdic, who controls a patch of northwest Bosnia in defiance of the Muslim-led government in Sarajevo, signed a peace agreement Friday with Bosnian Serbs. He made the pact in Belgrade with Radovan Karadzic of the self-proclaimed Bosnian Serb Republic and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic, who predicted it would "bring peace to half of (Bosnia)."
NEWS
May 9, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian and Croatian politicians in Bosnia-Herzegovina have conspired to carve up the newly independent republic, but new eruptions of ethnic fighting Friday underscored the failings of a plan that ignores the interests of Bosnia's largest nationality, the Slavic Muslims. State-run media in Belgrade heralded the Serb-Croat agreement as a step toward peace in Bosnia, where at least 400 people have been killed since Serbs took up arms to protest independence two months ago.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Croats battled Bosnia's Muslim-led army for the western half of Mostar on Tuesday, defying a truce intended to cool renewed fighting between the former allies. Croatian forces were trying to push the Muslims across the Neretva River to the east bank. On Monday, the Croats captured the army headquarters in the city, which was burned out and still smoking Tuesday. Many Croats want to unite southwestern Bosnia with neighboring Croatia, making the Neretva the eastern boundary of a "Greater Croatia."
NEWS
September 20, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the president of Bosnia-Herzegovina pondered an unwanted partitioning of his country as the price for peace, international mediators scrambled Sunday to salvage a pact they hope will bring an end to the deadly conflict. A cease-fire that was widely ignored across Bosnia when it went into effect Saturday appeared to take hold belatedly, suggesting some commitment on the part of government and rebel forces to give the latest armistice drive a chance. U.N.
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