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NATIONAL
August 21, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The budget ax has fallen on a CIA office that focused on declassifying historical materials, a move scholars say will mean fewer public disclosures about long-buried intelligence secrets and scandals. The Historical Collections Division, which has declassified documents on top Soviet spies, a secret CIA airline in the Vietnam War, the Cuban missile crisis and other major operations, has been disbanded. The office that handles Freedom of Information Act requests will take over the work.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
April 22, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Kids, do not try this at home: Scientists have found that they can create high-quality graphene sheets using a kitchen blender and ordinary dishwasher detergent. The findings, published in the journal Nature Materials, outline a fresh way to create large amounts of this remarkable material - which could speed up the process toward putting them into future computers , smart coatings and solar cells. Graphene is a two-dimensional lattice of hexagons made up of graphite, the most stable form of carbon under standard conditions.
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SCIENCE
March 24, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Our bones are remarkable feats of engineering; strong and yet light, shot through with holes and yet able to bear incredible loads. This super-strong natural material is built as cells incorporate hard minerals like calcium into living tissue. Now, scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are borrowing this idea from nature: They've created living cells that incorporate inorganic matter like gold and quantum dots. These bacterial factories, described in the journal Nature Materials, could one day help create fully functional hybrid "living materials" that could be integrated into everyday objects and devices, from solar panels to adjustable furniture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Bradley Zint
The railroad buffs who operate Goat Hill Junction just can't seem to catch a break. Just weeks after thieves broke into the model railroad grounds and stole $9,000 in aluminum tracks and other material, vandals broke into the 40-acre Costa Mesa attraction and caused $4,000 in damage by smashing six picnic tables and prying open an irrigation box. "This is the first time we've seen wholesale destruction like that," said Hank Castignetti, spokesman...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Holly Myers
In a welcome follow-up to "Requiem for the Sun, " Blum & Poe's superb survey earlier this year of the art of Japan's Mono-ha movement, the gallery has assembled another, similarly museum-grade survey exploring the work of one of its leading figures, Kishio Suga. With 86 works spanning more than 40 years, it is a substantial undertaking - Suga's first solo exhibition in North America, and the first single-artist show to occupy both floors of the gallery's prodigious space. It feels light and fresh, almost spontaneously generative.
REAL ESTATE
February 13, 2005
The article on soaring costs of construction materials ("Materials Add Up ... Way Up" by Jeff Bertolucci, Jan. 30) was right on the mark. These price escalations are hitting larger-scale projects, including the Los Angeles Community Colleges' $2.4-billion construction program, as well as individual homeowners. To make the most of our limited bond funding and to keep costs in check, the L.A. Community Colleges have instituted practices that go beyond industry standards: We make bulk purchases whenever possible to get the best price available.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
When the upcoming comedy "The Hangover Part III" wrapped production in January, Warner Bros. was left with tons of used plywood, joists, furniture, faux brick and other materials from the film set. But instead of hauling the leftovers to the landfill, the studio donated the items - enough to fill 10 truckloads - to the charitable organization Habitat for Humanity of Greater Los Angeles, to be sold in Habitat's stores in Gardena and Norwalk....
NEWS
April 25, 1989
Solano County authorities evacuated dozens of residents within a half mile of a barn holding 70,000 gallons of illegally stored toxic chemicals, including explosives. The materials, many stored in leaky containers, were found by the state Department of Food and Agriculture, acting on a tip, at a rural site north of the Sacramento River between Sacramento and San Francisco. Investigators found chemicals used in munitions that had been stored in the barn in drums since 1981. Deputy Dist.
NEWS
November 12, 2001
Sunspots act like planet-sized hurricanes that suck in materials from below the sun's surface as fast as they spit it out above the surface, allowing the spots to persist for long periods of time. Astronomers have long known that blockages in the magnetic field below the sun's surface allow solar gases to cool, forming darker spots, but it was not clear why they persisted.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
We can't get away from our childhoods. Sometimes this is a good thing. Los Angeles artist Jacqueline Dreager was born into a family of special-effects experts. Her father and two uncles worked for, among others, movie legend Cecil B. DeMille. "I grew up in my garage with my father, not with my mother at the sewing machine," Dreager said. "My uncle gave me tips on how to use fiberglass that you could never learn in school."
SCIENCE
March 24, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Our bones are remarkable feats of engineering; strong and yet light, shot through with holes and yet able to bear incredible loads. This super-strong natural material is built as cells incorporate hard minerals like calcium into living tissue. Now, scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are borrowing this idea from nature: They've created living cells that incorporate inorganic matter like gold and quantum dots. These bacterial factories, described in the journal Nature Materials, could one day help create fully functional hybrid "living materials" that could be integrated into everyday objects and devices, from solar panels to adjustable furniture.
HOME & GARDEN
March 17, 2014 | By Carren Jao
 A sliver of a yard can be a powerful thing. Materials & Applications has proved this time and again by collaborating with architects to put up fantastical creations on a 25-by-40-foot gravel yard fronting Silver Lake Boulevard. Past double-take-worthy installations include a golden-leafed Mylar canopy in the shape of a black hole by Ball-Nogues Studio, a motorized vegetative cover that opens and refolds like origami by Eddie Sykes and a sinuous, fire-shaped gazebo made of pressure-laminated panels by Edmund Ming-Yip Kwong.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
If you missed the French series "The Returned" on Sundance Channel last year, or if it was just too opaque/mood-soaked/subtitled (i.e. French) for you, ABC now offers "Resurrection," a brighter if not bolder and certainly faster-paced (i.e. American) version of a world in which the dead begin returning to the ones they left behind. Based on the Jason Mott novel "The Returned," the series opens gorgeously enough with a young boy (Landon Gimenez) waking up in a rice paddy in China.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
FARMINGTON, N.M. - In World War II he served as a Navajo code talker, one of the Marines who became legendary by using their native tongue to transmit messages the enemy could not decipher. Years later, to express its appreciation, the Navajo Nation built Tom Jones Jr. a house. These days the 89-year-old Jones struggles to keep warm during winter because the only heat inside his house emanates from an antique wood stove in the living room. The electricity doesn't work in his bathroom and the floor has worn away, exposing plywood beneath his feet.
IMAGE
February 28, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In today's creative scene, where art, fashion and design converge, Santa Monica fragrance designer Haley Alexander van Oosten is adding scent to the cultural mix. Collaborating with everyone from style maven/photographer Lisa Eisner and designer and artist David Wiseman to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Maxfield and Commune design, Van Oosten is making a name for herself by challenging traditional notions of fragrance. "I find commercial perfumery to be a very limited medium," says Van Oosten, whose company name, L'Oeil du Vert, means "eye of the green.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"Angels in Stardust" is a creaky coming-of-age fantasy-drama whose luminous lead actress, A.J. Michalka ("Grace Unplugged"), has hopefully seen the last of this kind of ungainly corn pone. Writer-director William Robert Carey may channel bits from such classics as "The Purple Rose of Cairo" and "The Last Picture Show" to tell this Dust Bowl tale of teen dreams, trailer trash, cowboys and, yes, Indians (or as the film's hugely retrograde approach to Native Americans would have it, "Injuns")
HOME & GARDEN
September 17, 2011 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
To anyone reading the real estate ads in recent years, it could seem that granite was the only material worth using for a kitchen counter, as important as updated electrical or a reliable roof. Granite isn't going anywhere. But many designers and homeowners are turning to glass, manufactured stone, metal and other materials to create counters that work for people who actually cook as well for those who see the kitchen as a decorative accessory. "What consumers now have seen is there is kind of this granite fatigue.
TRAVEL
July 9, 2010 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When my niece, Sarah, was little, she returned from a long trip to Europe with her parents and announced she never wanted to set foot in another museum. Children who travel abroad are lucky, but on another level you have to pity the poor kids dragged through ancient ruins, art galleries, cathedrals and castles, until they're ready to drop, when all they really want is a Game Boy and a hot dog. But in the Burgundy region of France, there's a castle that fascinates children — and it isn't another Euro Disney.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Lawyers in the upcoming trial of an alleged top Al Qaeda leader reached a compromise Thursday to allow his defense attorney to submit written questions to Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, with government lawyers allowed to review the questions and answers from the presumed Sept. 11 mastermind to ensure no classified material is included. If government national security officials clear those replies, that could lead to highly dramatic testimony from Mohammed during the New York trial of Sulaiman abu Ghaith, possibly through a closed-circuit feed or videotape from Guantanamo Bay. The complex turn of events came after Mohammed agreed to help the legal defense of Abu Ghaith, who is charged with criminal conspiracy in connection with the Sept.
SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | Amina Khan
How do you make a light, low-density material without compromising its strength? It's a conundrum that has plagued engineers and builders looking for tough, durable materials that don't weigh them down. Now, using a high-tech 3D printer, scientists in Germany have created a lightweight but very strong material inspired by the intricate microscopic architecture of living tissue - our own bones. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could pave the way for future super-light materials that could be used in microfluidics devices or to make lighter (and thus cheaper)
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