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May 13, 1992 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
By the time she reached her early 30s, Deb Olander had a bachelor's degree in math, a master's degree in operations research and seven years of experience with the Massachusetts-based Digital Equipment Corp. Still, she felt restless and found herself "looking around for something new." Two years ago, after returning from maternity leave for her first child, Olander joined Digital's pioneering Engineers Into Education program.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1996 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Granada Hills High School, they've broken the sound barrier. The deaf students mainstreamed into the school's math and science magnet program say the classes will better prepare them for college. And, at least for hard-of-hearing sophomore Lisa Scheybel, 15, there's another social consequence: a boyfriend with hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Seeing a tray of fleshy, blood-encrusted pig hearts for the first time, Justice Shank and Ashley Cano screamed -- in total delight. "Blood! Hearts! This looks like fun!" said Justice, poking at a pink, grapefruit-sized blob through surgical gloves. "Look at all the arteries." Ashley cupped the porcine organ to her chest in a swoop of pretend sadness. "Hey, hey, don't stick your finger in my heart," she said. "You're going to break it!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High school girls are narrowing the gap in participation in advanced math and science courses, but still lag behind boys in such key disciplines as physics and computer science, a recent study concludes. Boys, however, are far less likely than girls to take advanced English or foreign-language classes in high school, or to set their sights on education, health or social science majors in college. "Gender Gaps: Where Schools Still Fail Our Children," a report from the American Assn.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cascade Pass, a small publisher in Culver City, is publishing a series of "You Can Be" books to encourage young girls to consider careers in the sciences. Judith Love Cohen, an electrical engineer who worked on the Apollo 12 lunar mission, co-authors the books, which depict the lives of female oceanographers, engineers, architects, astronauts, marine biologists and zoologists. She will read excerpts from the series at 3 p.m. Friday at Girls Inc., 5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2001 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you consider schools across the land with basketball teams, a handful come to mind. Kentucky, home of the Wildcats. Kansas, home of the Jayhawks. Duke. Georgetown. Temple. And there are others less well-known--like Gonzaga--that sometimes flash and flop in the pan, but offer exciting moments. But then, this year at least, there is UC Irvine, home of, well, UC Irvine--a suburban campus best known for the sciences, and for not being home to a hoops program to be proud of.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WHEN DON MUEPO WAS 15, HE listened to his friends talk about playing football, basketball and other sports at a free summer sports camp at USC. So the next summer, Muepo made sure that he was in on the fun. It was a move that helped change his life. "Everything about it is so positive," said Muepo, who has not missed the National Youth Sports Program in 16 years. "It becomes a major impact in your life."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2003 | Sandra Matthews, Special to The Times
Fifth-grade teacher Max Schafer's class at Fenton Avenue Charter School in Lake View Terrace has become a mini-film school. But instead of shooting ghost stories, adventures or romances, the students are producing, directing and acting in computerized videos about math, science, vocabulary and other educational topics. These I-movies (Internet movies), produced and edited on a program in classroom computers, are an increasingly popular tool at schools in California and nationwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1994 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pierce College student Karl Beutel figured he could handle his introductory biology course at the Woodland Hills campus this fall, at least until he did poorly on the first test. At that point, Beutel sought help, and the college had an innovative answer. Beutel, 19, and other classmates were able to sign up for after-hours study sessions funded by the college and hosted by a student who has already passed the class with an A grade. The result, Beutel said, "has been very helpful.
OPINION
May 5, 2009 | Randy Pollock, Randy Pollock, a former USC lecturer, consults with companies on communication and management issues in China.
Which country -- the United States or China -- will make the 21st century its own? When President Obama recently called for American young people "to be makers of things" and focus on subjects such as science and engineering, it was partly a nod to China's rapid growth. Had he lived, taught and consulted in China for the last 33 months, as I have, he might have urged American students first to follow his example and study the liberal arts.
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