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Matrix Churchill Company

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NEWS
November 22, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein's most-prized weapon lay concealed on a mountaintop in northern Iraq, where it was not discovered until well after the Persian Gulf War. The 165-foot-long cannon, capable of firing projectiles armed with nuclear devices and lethal chemicals at targets more than 100 miles away, had been tested and was nearly operational. The cannon was one of several "super-guns" that Hussein planned to acquire as part of his ill-fated drive toward military dominance in the Persian Gulf.
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NEWS
November 22, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein's most-prized weapon lay concealed on a mountaintop in northern Iraq, where it was not discovered until well after the Persian Gulf War. The 165-foot-long cannon, capable of firing projectiles armed with nuclear devices and lethal chemicals at targets more than 100 miles away, had been tested and was nearly operational. The cannon was one of several "super-guns" that Hussein planned to acquire as part of his ill-fated drive toward military dominance in the Persian Gulf.
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NEWS
November 10, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three British business executives were cleared Monday of charges that they illegally sold arms-making equipment to Iraq, ending a trial that had raised new questions about the support of Saddam Hussein's regime by Western governments before the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The British government allowed sophisticated machinery to be shipped to Iraq in the late 1980s despite knowledge that the equipment was essential to Iraqi efforts to build a nuclear weapon and other armaments, according to intelligence documents intended for disclosure at a London trial.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top executives of an Iraqi-owned company that funneled military technology to Baghdad before the Persian Gulf War were given immunity by federal prosecutors investigating $5 billion in hidden Iraqi loans, according to documents.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The British government allowed sophisticated machinery to be shipped to Iraq in the late 1980s despite knowledge that the equipment was essential to Iraqi efforts to build a nuclear weapon and other armaments, according to intelligence documents intended for disclosure at a London trial.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and MURRAY WAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In September of 1990, Customs Service agents padlocked the doors of an Iraqi front company in a Cleveland suburb and, in response to a presidential order, froze its $2 million in assets. Customs Commissioner Carol Hallett said the action against Matrix Churchill Corp. came after agents learned that Iraq, which had invaded Kuwait one month earlier, had bought the firm "for the specific purpose of illegally acquiring critical weapons technology."
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Waas is a special correspondent and Frantz is a Times staff writer
The CIA warned Secretary of State James A. Baker III in a September, 1989, top-secret assessment that Iraq was developing a "nuclear weapons capability," and the agency identified the specific technology being sought by Baghdad, according to classified documents. Nevertheless, a month later, Baker assured Iraq's foreign minister that the Bush Administration had no plans to tighten controls on technology exports to Iraq.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the House Banking Committee on Monday accused the Bush Administration of approving the sale of a glass-fiber factory to an Iraqi government facility known by U.S. officials to be responsible for developing nuclear and chemical weapons and ballistic missiles. The chairman, Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.), said the transaction, which involved a small Chino, Calif., firm, is another example of the Administration's mishandling of prewar policy with Baghdad. "Any claim that the U.S.
NEWS
November 10, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three British business executives were cleared Monday of charges that they illegally sold arms-making equipment to Iraq, ending a trial that had raised new questions about the support of Saddam Hussein's regime by Western governments before the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top executives of an Iraqi-owned company that funneled military technology to Baghdad before the Persian Gulf War were given immunity by federal prosecutors investigating $5 billion in hidden Iraqi loans, according to documents.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the House Banking Committee on Monday accused the Bush Administration of approving the sale of a glass-fiber factory to an Iraqi government facility known by U.S. officials to be responsible for developing nuclear and chemical weapons and ballistic missiles. The chairman, Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.), said the transaction, which involved a small Chino, Calif., firm, is another example of the Administration's mishandling of prewar policy with Baghdad. "Any claim that the U.S.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and MURRAY WAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In September of 1990, Customs Service agents padlocked the doors of an Iraqi front company in a Cleveland suburb and, in response to a presidential order, froze its $2 million in assets. Customs Commissioner Carol Hallett said the action against Matrix Churchill Corp. came after agents learned that Iraq, which had invaded Kuwait one month earlier, had bought the firm "for the specific purpose of illegally acquiring critical weapons technology."
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Waas is a special correspondent and Frantz is a Times staff writer
The CIA warned Secretary of State James A. Baker III in a September, 1989, top-secret assessment that Iraq was developing a "nuclear weapons capability," and the agency identified the specific technology being sought by Baghdad, according to classified documents. Nevertheless, a month later, Baker assured Iraq's foreign minister that the Bush Administration had no plans to tighten controls on technology exports to Iraq.
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