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OPINION
May 9, 2010
Nothing energizes cartoonists like a catastrophe, especially a man-made one with a manatee-chokin', pelican-soakin', habitat-threatenin' black-hat wearin', black-gold drillin' villain. Matt Davies hooked up endangered fishin' with dangerous fission. Ed Stein blew me away by tilting at windmills. And Steve Kelley (drawing from New Orleans), caps a terrific trio by huffing and puffing at Washington windbags. So much good stuff. Let's hope the impact of a huge, black, inky eruption can impact the political environment for a long time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
No art form is more sensitive to social media than television. Over the years, shows as disparate as "Grey's Anatomy," "Mad Men" and "The Colbert Report" widened and intensified their fan bases through Twitter, Facebook, network websites and YouTube, making devotion just as important as ratings in defining a show's success. But there can be a dark side to this intensity; a fan's feeling of ownership can erupt in vitriolic hysteria when a beloved character is killed or an episode doesn't deliver - the social-media furor over the first season finale of "The Killing" almost got the show canceled.
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OPINION
August 28, 2010
Cartoonists spent the week clucking about the egg recall, zeroing in on Manhattan Mosque Madness and poking fun at political primaries. But a few marked the five-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina by sympathizing with millions of flood-displaced Pakistanis. Pat Bagley pointed out ironic homegrown terminology. Jeff Danziger flew off the handle about sky-high military hardware. And Matt Davies' terrifying suicide life vest showed us why relief is far more than just a humanitarian matter.
OPINION
October 17, 2010
Cartoonists sift through mountains of information, mine the deepest layers of the mediasphere, seeking to strike that one golden nugget of truth and then extract it and amalgamate it into irony. Pat Oliphant used the headline-grabbing Chilean rescue to undercut underhanded underground business. In a lighter vein, Matt Davies blasted the cast of caricatures hoping to be elected this fall. And Jeff Koterba's undersized rescue vehicle conveys a metaphorical message that doesn't augur well for financial markets.
OPINION
June 1, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Amid global catastrophes, (famine, cyclones, tornadoes, the Democratic nominating process), a former spokesman threw the book at President Bush, even as the current spokeswoman filed countercharges. Matt Davies penned the perfect review. Rob Rogers used his space to draw a cosmic connection between little green men and blue-state hopefuls. And Tom Toles tapped into America's endless supply of oil-price laments with an ironic gem. -- Joel Pett
NEWS
November 15, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky. His cartoons also appear in USA Today.
Sometimes cartoonists are clever, lighthearted cutups. Other times we labor over life-and-death matters, solemnly assessing senseless slaughter, harping on healthcare, conceptualizing on abortion. Nate Beeler grimly traced the roots of fundamentalist fury across the global divide and back. Dan Wasserman chewed out Democrats for choosing compromise. And Matt Davies' off-the-wall medical treatment recalled a Cold War classic from the Great Communicator. This week, weighty trumps witty.
OPINION
October 17, 2010
Cartoonists sift through mountains of information, mine the deepest layers of the mediasphere, seeking to strike that one golden nugget of truth and then extract it and amalgamate it into irony. Pat Oliphant used the headline-grabbing Chilean rescue to undercut underhanded underground business. In a lighter vein, Matt Davies blasted the cast of caricatures hoping to be elected this fall. And Jeff Koterba's undersized rescue vehicle conveys a metaphorical message that doesn't augur well for financial markets.
OPINION
June 20, 2010
I write this week from the annual confab of political cartoonists in Portland, Ore., where the cocktail chatter (OK, we're more the beer type) is all about the difficulty of focusing on anything other than the monstrous BP calamity. But cartoonists never lose sight of the really important stuff: like war. Scott Stantis made somber note of a dubious Afghanistan military milestone. Matt Davies gazed into his McChrystal ball, but saw no peace, just chaotic conflict since time immemorial.
OPINION
August 1, 2010
It's no family secret that cartoonists love to gig Uncle Sam's Big Brother about the clandestine clan and their Keystone cop-ops. So reports of the byzantine national security apparatus and trillions (okay, tens of thousands) of pages of leaks on Afghanistan delivered a double-whammy of ammo to the doubters who deal in ink by the double-barrel. Matt Davies and I both did a number on double-talkers and double-dealers who can't do the numbers. And Ed Stein's Page 1 news flash was no boost to boots on the ground.
OPINION
April 12, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Cartoonists, wielding our mightier-than-the-sword weapon of choice, went after WMD this week. Yet another mass shooting in a tragic season of spree fever had Matt Davies fingering the gun lobby. Tom Toles went ballistic, lamenting the lame international response to Kim Jong Il's ill-fated satellite (or was it?) launch. And I took aim at targeted military cuts with an in-your-face rendition of the president's just deserts. I gotta stop being so cynical -- or at least slow the rate of increase.
OPINION
August 28, 2010
Cartoonists spent the week clucking about the egg recall, zeroing in on Manhattan Mosque Madness and poking fun at political primaries. But a few marked the five-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina by sympathizing with millions of flood-displaced Pakistanis. Pat Bagley pointed out ironic homegrown terminology. Jeff Danziger flew off the handle about sky-high military hardware. And Matt Davies' terrifying suicide life vest showed us why relief is far more than just a humanitarian matter.
OPINION
August 1, 2010
It's no family secret that cartoonists love to gig Uncle Sam's Big Brother about the clandestine clan and their Keystone cop-ops. So reports of the byzantine national security apparatus and trillions (okay, tens of thousands) of pages of leaks on Afghanistan delivered a double-whammy of ammo to the doubters who deal in ink by the double-barrel. Matt Davies and I both did a number on double-talkers and double-dealers who can't do the numbers. And Ed Stein's Page 1 news flash was no boost to boots on the ground.
OPINION
June 20, 2010
I write this week from the annual confab of political cartoonists in Portland, Ore., where the cocktail chatter (OK, we're more the beer type) is all about the difficulty of focusing on anything other than the monstrous BP calamity. But cartoonists never lose sight of the really important stuff: like war. Scott Stantis made somber note of a dubious Afghanistan military milestone. Matt Davies gazed into his McChrystal ball, but saw no peace, just chaotic conflict since time immemorial.
OPINION
May 9, 2010
Nothing energizes cartoonists like a catastrophe, especially a man-made one with a manatee-chokin', pelican-soakin', habitat-threatenin' black-hat wearin', black-gold drillin' villain. Matt Davies hooked up endangered fishin' with dangerous fission. Ed Stein blew me away by tilting at windmills. And Steve Kelley (drawing from New Orleans), caps a terrific trio by huffing and puffing at Washington windbags. So much good stuff. Let's hope the impact of a huge, black, inky eruption can impact the political environment for a long time.
NEWS
November 15, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky. His cartoons also appear in USA Today.
Sometimes cartoonists are clever, lighthearted cutups. Other times we labor over life-and-death matters, solemnly assessing senseless slaughter, harping on healthcare, conceptualizing on abortion. Nate Beeler grimly traced the roots of fundamentalist fury across the global divide and back. Dan Wasserman chewed out Democrats for choosing compromise. And Matt Davies' off-the-wall medical treatment recalled a Cold War classic from the Great Communicator. This week, weighty trumps witty.
OPINION
November 8, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His cartoons also appear in USA Today.
The commentary crowd consulted crystal balls, Tarot cards, voodoo dolls and psychics to divine meaning from the off-off-year elections. Matt Davies read the "tea party" leaves and dogged the GOP for its grand old tricks. Gary Varvel gazed into his magic 8-ball and saw B-ball outpolling democracy. I tried to take the long view on the president's misfortune tellers, but somehow I doubt anyone's listening. Oh well. Back to the old Ouija board. -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader.
OPINION
July 5, 2009 | JOEL PETT, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Sometimes it's good not to be center ring in the media circus. While the kings of pop-culture journalism scramble to meet round-the-clock deadlines, and the Web denizens deify and denigrate, cartoonists can reflect a bit, even blend tribute and peripheral commentary. Matt Davies handed in an iron-fisted Iran-focused gem. Tom Toles slid by with a topical optical illusion. And I hungered for the memory of one of music's truly altruistic (if ultimately all-too-unrealistic) events.
OPINION
June 7, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Huge, boffo front-page news everywhere, and I don't mean Conan taking over for Jay. An American industrial icon crashed and burned, and Matt Davies checked under the hood of the belly-up beast. Wrenching. A historic Latino appointment was appraised, and Dan Wasserman, reacting to the reactionaries, pondered what bigotry begat. The president delivered a much-anticipated address in the cradle of the clash of civilizations, and I penned a somewhat long-winded response -- for a cartoon anyway.
OPINION
July 5, 2009 | JOEL PETT, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Sometimes it's good not to be center ring in the media circus. While the kings of pop-culture journalism scramble to meet round-the-clock deadlines, and the Web denizens deify and denigrate, cartoonists can reflect a bit, even blend tribute and peripheral commentary. Matt Davies handed in an iron-fisted Iran-focused gem. Tom Toles slid by with a topical optical illusion. And I hungered for the memory of one of music's truly altruistic (if ultimately all-too-unrealistic) events.
OPINION
June 7, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Huge, boffo front-page news everywhere, and I don't mean Conan taking over for Jay. An American industrial icon crashed and burned, and Matt Davies checked under the hood of the belly-up beast. Wrenching. A historic Latino appointment was appraised, and Dan Wasserman, reacting to the reactionaries, pondered what bigotry begat. The president delivered a much-anticipated address in the cradle of the clash of civilizations, and I penned a somewhat long-winded response -- for a cartoon anyway.
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