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Matt Frewer

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MAGAZINE
November 8, 1987 | DIANE REISCHEL
Matt Frewer squirms, then delivers a fluttery, Max Headroom laugh. It's not nerves, but rather an acknowledgment of the manic character who made him famous. Frewer, 29, who starred in the recently canceled ABC series, "Max Headroom," is probably best known for playing the rubber-haired icon in Coca-Cola commercials. And the Headroom cult continues: Last month Frewer signed a multimillion-dollar deal for a new spate of ads as Coke's video pitchman.
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NEWS
January 10, 1993
Thank you for the article on one of my favorite comic-actors, Matt Frewer ("Mad Matt," TV Times, Dec. 27). Frewer is in the same league as the brilliant Robin Williams. But I feel that his new series "Shaky Ground" (Fox) is beneath his considerable talents. Frewer deserves better than the painfully ordinary "Shaky Ground." Tammy Smith, Santee
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NEWS
January 10, 1993
Thank you for the article on one of my favorite comic-actors, Matt Frewer ("Mad Matt," TV Times, Dec. 27). Frewer is in the same league as the brilliant Robin Williams. But I feel that his new series "Shaky Ground" (Fox) is beneath his considerable talents. Frewer deserves better than the painfully ordinary "Shaky Ground." Tammy Smith, Santee
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | JOE RHODES, Joe Rhodes is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer and frequent contributor to TV Times
Matt Frewer had been a good boy the first time through, doing the scene the way it was written, sticking to the script of his new Fox sitcom, "Shaky Ground," delivering the punch lines exactly on cue, just as he'd rehearsed them all week. "Could you throw it in a blender," he was supposed to say when his TV wife (played by Robin Riker) told him his dinner was ready. "I don't have the energy to chew."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN
At first, the creators of Headroom--star of a cable-TV talk show, Coca-Cola commercials and later ABC's short-lived, critically acclaimed "Max Headroom" series--wanted the public to believe that Max, an irreverent, staccato-voiced spokesman for the video generation, was actually a computer-generated image. It didn't take long, however, for the public to discover that M-m-max was actually M-m-matt--Matt Frewer, 31, who portrayed both Max and Max's alter-ego, TV reporter Edison Carter, on the "Max Headroom" series, which satirized network TV. "There was this ruse perpetuated that Max was a computer-generated person, not a guy in make-up," Frewer says.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | JOE RHODES, Joe Rhodes is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer and frequent contributor to TV Times
Matt Frewer had been a good boy the first time through, doing the scene the way it was written, sticking to the script of his new Fox sitcom, "Shaky Ground," delivering the punch lines exactly on cue, just as he'd rehearsed them all week. "Could you throw it in a blender," he was supposed to say when his TV wife (played by Robin Riker) told him his dinner was ready. "I don't have the energy to chew."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
He performs CPR on stuffed pink ponies; he skis on his couch; he pelts his friends with anchovies, sucks on a baby's pacifier and even slips on his own banana peels. He's a mixture of Lucy, Maxwell Smart, Uncle Fester, Mork from Ork, Max Headroom and Hawkeye Pierce. Told that a colleague's son can't go with him to the park to play basketball because there are too many weirdos there, he responds assuringly, "That's OK--I'm fluent in weirdo." Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press.
Foxy Sundays: Fox will welcome two new Sunday night series and wave goodby to two old ones. The new programs, "Batman: The Animated Series" and "Shaky Ground," premiere Dec. 13. "Batman," currently a weekday show on the Fox Children's Network, will air at 7 p.m.; "Shaky Ground," a comedy about a family starring Matt Frewer as the father, airs at 7:30. In addition, "The Ben Stiller Show" will move to Sundays at 10:30 p.m. Fox's "Great Scott" and "Woops!"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1993
Macaulay Culkin got left behind by accident in "Home Alone." Now Robert Jayne is starring in a TV movie for Fox as a 16-year-old who gets left at home on purpose. "The Day My Parents Ran Away" is scheduled to air Dec. 13. Blair Brown and Matt Frewer star in the comedy as Jayne's parents, who become so frustrated with his lazy, selfish attitude that they take off in hopes of teaching him a lesson in responsibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1993
Cable's USA Network will add two new shows to its "Cartoon Express" this fall: "Problem Child," a half-hour animated series loosely based on the movie of the same name, and "The Itsy Bitsy Spider," a series based on the adventures of the nursery rhyme's spider as he avenges injustice. Frank Welker, who portrayed Itsy in a seven-minute theatrical short based on the rhyme, will provide the voice of the title character in the latter show.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
He performs CPR on stuffed pink ponies; he skis on his couch; he pelts his friends with anchovies, sucks on a baby's pacifier and even slips on his own banana peels. He's a mixture of Lucy, Maxwell Smart, Uncle Fester, Mork from Ork, Max Headroom and Hawkeye Pierce. Told that a colleague's son can't go with him to the park to play basketball because there are too many weirdos there, he responds assuringly, "That's OK--I'm fluent in weirdo." Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN
At first, the creators of Headroom--star of a cable-TV talk show, Coca-Cola commercials and later ABC's short-lived, critically acclaimed "Max Headroom" series--wanted the public to believe that Max, an irreverent, staccato-voiced spokesman for the video generation, was actually a computer-generated image. It didn't take long, however, for the public to discover that M-m-max was actually M-m-matt--Matt Frewer, 31, who portrayed both Max and Max's alter-ego, TV reporter Edison Carter, on the "Max Headroom" series, which satirized network TV. "There was this ruse perpetuated that Max was a computer-generated person, not a guy in make-up," Frewer says.
MAGAZINE
November 8, 1987 | DIANE REISCHEL
Matt Frewer squirms, then delivers a fluttery, Max Headroom laugh. It's not nerves, but rather an acknowledgment of the manic character who made him famous. Frewer, 29, who starred in the recently canceled ABC series, "Max Headroom," is probably best known for playing the rubber-haired icon in Coca-Cola commercials. And the Headroom cult continues: Last month Frewer signed a multimillion-dollar deal for a new spate of ads as Coke's video pitchman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1990
I've found "Doctor, Doctor" to be just plain queer, with vague writing that mostly misses its mark. It seems to struggle to be funny--merely a pretender to much better, truly loony efforts such as "Police Squad," "Get Smart" and even "Mork and Mindy." Like Robin Williams, "Doctor, Doctor" star Matt Frewer is free to "improvise new jokes or blurt out puns," but unfortunately, unlike the splendid Williams, he doesn't score points doing it.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1986 | TERRY ATKINSON
"Max Headroom." Karl-Lorimar. $39.95. Though he acts like it, Max isn't the biggest star of the '80s--but he (it?) may be the strangest . An English-eye summary of all that's smarmy about American show-biz types, Max is a hilariously self-adoring TV image. Portrayed by Matt Frewer with makeup and trickery, he's supposedly computer-generated--a conceit born in this British TV/Cinemax production.
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