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Matt Groening

ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"The Simpsons," Fox TV's runaway hit, moves to its new Thursday time slot tonight, challenging NBC's top-rated "The Cosby Show." Both programs are repeats, and "The Simpsons" will remain in reruns until late October--a month after new episodes of "Cosby" start airing. Not an auspicious beginning for what many observers see as a David vs. Goliath confrontation. Fox Entertainment President Peter Chernin insists that he is not out to topple "Cosby," but to gain a toehold in weeknight prime time.
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NEWS
June 24, 1990 | VICTOR F. ZONANA and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bart Simpson was drafted into the war against AIDS here at the Sixth International Conference on AIDS Saturday. At a conference devoid of major breakthroughs promising immediate relief from the ever-rising death toll, one of the biggest sensations was a new and apparently unauthorized T-shirt featuring an image of the cartoon brat. "AIDS is a global crisis, dude," reads the caption coming out of Bart's mouth.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | JOE RHODES
Until he created "The Simpsons," Matt Groening used to pretend that he never watched much television, that he despised the tube and everything it stood for. But now that he's an executive producer of one of the year's most-talked-about television shows, Groening, 36, is free to admit that he was indeed a product of a cathode ray environment, just like the rest of America born since the baby boom. "My biography could be written by consulting any TV Guide from the 1960s," Groening said.
MAGAZINE
April 29, 1990 | Joe Morgenstern, Joe Morgenstern is a journalist and screenwriter who lives in Los Angeles.
UPSTAIRS, in the toy-filled nursery of a house perched on bluff's edge in Pacific Palisades, a chubby toddler named Homer started howling a few Sundays ago as his mother hoisted him into his crib for a midday nap. Downstairs, in the kitchen, Homer's chubby, bearded father listened calmly to the din. "I can relate to that," he said with feeling. " 'I'm not tired, I don't want to take a nap, you can't do this to me!' " Little Homer surely was not alone in his outrage and grief.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
A daringly off-center little comedy titled "The Simpsons" has bolted out of the box to grab a deservedly huge national following and become the most successful series on Fox. "There's room on TV for a dysfunctional family you can laugh at," noted brilliant cartoonist-writer Matt Groening (pronounced Graining) about the soulfully geeky animated characters he designed in about 15 minutes. Airing at 8:30 p.m.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
His syndicated comic strip called "Life in Hell" stars three pathological rabbits and two fez-wearing gay businessmen. His three lines of greeting cards include a collection of covers for fake magazines, such as Today's Misery (with an articles on "What to Do With All That Extra Room in Bed") and a group of phony movie posters, including "Young Republicans Go Shopping."
BOOKS
June 29, 1986 | A former newspaper and magazine cartoonist, Solomon is at work on a history of American animation to be published next year by Knopf
Matt Groening, the creator of the "Life In Hell" strip in the Los Angeles Weekly, is one of the funniest and most original cartoonists working in the comics today. Romance in the contemporary world provides the principle target for his mordant humor in this first anthology of his work. These telling examinations of modern relationships are far more accurate--and entertaining--than the old husband-and-wife-at-the-table cartoons.
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