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Matt Mullican

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May 26, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Matt Mullican has lodged his multifaceted art somewhere between the decidedly common stuff of the everyday and the grand theoretical systems regularly concocted by modern culture in ambitious attempts to extract meaning from it. He tries to crack open the calcified familiarity of those systems in order to banish the rote thinking that inevitably comes to dominate them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2003 | Allan M. Jalon, Special to The Times
Two men are locked in a face-off. One, shouting in the high voice of a hysterical child, refuses to leave a hypnotic trance. The other, a hypnotist, is trying to take him out. "No, no, no, no, no, no, no!" cries the first, clamping a pillow over his head, "I don't want to hear you." The hypnotist tensely stands his ground: "Listen to my voice. Come here."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2003 | Allan M. Jalon, Special to The Times
Two men are locked in a face-off. One, shouting in the high voice of a hysterical child, refuses to leave a hypnotic trance. The other, a hypnotist, is trying to take him out. "No, no, no, no, no, no, no!" cries the first, clamping a pillow over his head, "I don't want to hear you." The hypnotist tensely stands his ground: "Listen to my voice. Come here."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Matt Mullican has lodged his multifaceted art somewhere between the decidedly common stuff of the everyday and the grand theoretical systems regularly concocted by modern culture in ambitious attempts to extract meaning from it. He tries to crack open the calcified familiarity of those systems in order to banish the rote thinking that inevitably comes to dominate them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1991
One doesn't know whether to be more astonished than indignant, more baffled than surprised, by Susan Kandel's Dec. 13 review of Matt Mullican's recent show at Richard Kuhlenschmidt Gallery in Santa Monica ("Matt Mullican's Clever but Static Project"). Her evaluation is nasty, brutish, and short, though scarcely short enough for her not to have uttered a farrago of illogical nonsense. When Kandel characterizes the career of this rising and quite young artist as immanent with "fascism," it is necessary to protest.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
On a bad day one is tempted to suspect the more esoteric sorts of art of being little more than a species of aesthetic drill sergeant, barking incoherent orders to get the naive recruits to do mental calisthenics that they essentially make up themselves. One knows from experience this is not true, but a theme show like "Topology" reawakens the sleeping philistine. "Topology" is a nice vague topic made foggier by seven artists doing widely disparate work and some quite awkwardly at that.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1991 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I've always been uncomfortable with Matt Mullican's project--with its authoritarianism, its solipsism, the surety underlying its cleverly designed but utterly static cosmology.
MAGAZINE
May 1, 1994 | Larry Gordon
L.A. has a bad rep for not preserving its own history; its art and culture dwell in the forever-changing present. But two new works attempt to change that by evoking the city's past. On the floors and walls of an L.A. Convention Center concourse are two enormous granite triptychs. One pays tribute to such Southern California landmarks as the original Brown Derby, the Central Library, Hollywood Bowl, Watts Towers, Chinese Theater and the freeway system.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
Matt Mullican's "Untitled (Bath Stone)" is a vast, low-lying swath of limestone slabs carved with the plan of a model city, a metaphysical construct that has preoccupied the artist throughout this decade. (The title refers to the English city in which the piece was carved.) Two oval areas on this plan contain incised clusters of images.
REAL ESTATE
December 18, 1988 | EVELYN De WOLFE, Times Staff Writer
A strong visual identity will be created for the Los Angeles Convention Center with its anticipated expansion, targeted for completion in early 1992. The $390-million project, expected to generate $504 million annually in economic benefits for the local economy by 1994, will add 2.5 million square feet of total space to the center's existing 1.5 million square feet, including parking.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1991
One doesn't know whether to be more astonished than indignant, more baffled than surprised, by Susan Kandel's Dec. 13 review of Matt Mullican's recent show at Richard Kuhlenschmidt Gallery in Santa Monica ("Matt Mullican's Clever but Static Project"). Her evaluation is nasty, brutish, and short, though scarcely short enough for her not to have uttered a farrago of illogical nonsense. When Kandel characterizes the career of this rising and quite young artist as immanent with "fascism," it is necessary to protest.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1991 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I've always been uncomfortable with Matt Mullican's project--with its authoritarianism, its solipsism, the surety underlying its cleverly designed but utterly static cosmology.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
On a bad day one is tempted to suspect the more esoteric sorts of art of being little more than a species of aesthetic drill sergeant, barking incoherent orders to get the naive recruits to do mental calisthenics that they essentially make up themselves. One knows from experience this is not true, but a theme show like "Topology" reawakens the sleeping philistine. "Topology" is a nice vague topic made foggier by seven artists doing widely disparate work and some quite awkwardly at that.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
With a double dose of adventurous contemporary art and a heavyweight historical show, Newport Harbor Art Museum seems likely to offer the serious art viewer the year's major supply of must-see Orange County exhibitions: "Cal Arts: Skeptical Beliefs" (Jan. 24-March 20) showcases the paintings, sculpture, video and film work of the maverick alumni of California Academy of the Arts in Valencia, a group that includes Eric Fischl, Jill Giegerich, Matt Mullican and David Salle.
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