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October 23, 2006 | William Lobdell and Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writers
At the recent premiere of "One Night With the King" in Westwood, movie producer Matthew Crouch took a few moments to offer thanks. "You know what I feel like would be an awesome thing to do right now?" Crouch said during a live broadcast of the opening festivities on "Praise the Lord" on the Trinity Broadcasting Network. "To thank my sweet little mom and dad, Paul and Jan Crouch." There's a lot to be thankful for.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2012 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
The Trinity Broadcasting Network, which bills itself as the world's largest Christian network, is embroiled in a legal battle involving allegations of massive financial fraud and lavish spending, including the purchase of a $100,000 motor home for family dogs. Brittany Koper, a former high-ranking TBN official and the granddaughter of its co-founder, Paul Crouch Sr., was fired by the network in September after discovering "illegal financial schemes" amounting to tens of millions of dollars, according to a lawsuit filed in Orange County Superior Court.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2012 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
The Trinity Broadcasting Network, which bills itself as the world's largest Christian network, is embroiled in a legal battle involving allegations of massive financial fraud and lavish spending, including the purchase of a $100,000 motor home for family dogs. Brittany Koper, a former high-ranking TBN official and the granddaughter of its co-founder, Paul Crouch Sr., was fired by the network in September after discovering "illegal financial schemes" amounting to tens of millions of dollars, according to a lawsuit filed in Orange County Superior Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2006 | William Lobdell and Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writers
At the recent premiere of "One Night With the King" in Westwood, movie producer Matthew Crouch took a few moments to offer thanks. "You know what I feel like would be an awesome thing to do right now?" Crouch said during a live broadcast of the opening festivities on "Praise the Lord" on the Trinity Broadcasting Network. "To thank my sweet little mom and dad, Paul and Jan Crouch." There's a lot to be thankful for.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2001
The ability of a television evangelist, Paul Crouch, to bankroll a feature film with a $22-million production budget is obscene ("Following the Book to Success," by Robert W. Welkos, Sept. 18). Whose money is he gambling with? In the acrid wake of terrorist attacks last week, Crouch's son, Matthew, has the audacity to imply that God had a hand in timing the release date of "Megiddo," the semi-biblical film he produced. Matthew Crouch is quoted as saying that "[God] positioned this film to be the answer for a question we didn't even know would be asked."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2006
I was encouraged to read that Matthew Crouch is producing movies that promote good Christian values in America ["Missionary in Hollywood," by William Lobdell and Stuart Pfeifer, Oct. 23]. I am sure the donors to his parents' ministry are happy to be sponsoring these films, as well as his mansions, luxury cars and hunting trips. I can think of no more Christian use for the money. MICHELE BEDJAI Los Angeles I wonder where God-endorsed movie producer Matthew Crouch's $240,000 Bentley Arnage, his seven other cars, the stuffed animal heads bought from some private "reserve" (a la Dick Cheney)
BUSINESS
September 16, 1999 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few weeks ago, producer Matthew Crouch rang up his financial angel, the man who helped him raise money to make his first film. Crouch had gotten comments from viewers at a preview screening and wanted to go over some changes. It was a short call. "Listen, bud, I'm dealing with some other stuff here," the benefactor said. "You just deal with it. I've got to go." Click. Another young producer might have been discouraged by such a brushoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Megiddo: The Omega Code 2" finds Michael York reprising his role of Satan in this unconvincing sequel to the 1999 surprise hit co-produced by Matthew Crouch, son of Trinity Broadcasting Network operator and televangelist Paul Crouch, executive producer of both films. Its title refers the plains of Megiddo, near present-day Jerusalem and the place fundamentalist Christians believe will be the site of Armageddon, the final battle between good and evil.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1999 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few weeks ago, producer Matthew Crouch rang up his financial angel, the man who helped him raise money to make his first film. Crouch had gotten comments from viewers at a preview screening and wanted to go over some changes. It was a short call. "Listen, bud, I'm dealing with some other stuff here," the benefactor said. "You just deal with it. I've got to go." Click. Another young producer might have been discouraged by such a brushoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2001 | STEVE LOPEZ
When last we visited the Costa Mesa-based televangelists Jan and Paul Crouch, they were purchasing a $5-million Newport Beach estate in the name of Jesus, who lived like a pauper. Now there's news on another front. The colorful Crouches, who preside over those hair circus praise-a-thons on the Trinity Broadcasting Network, have been sued for $40 million in a battle over artistic interpretation of the end of time. They are indeed a gift from God, these people.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2001
The ability of a television evangelist, Paul Crouch, to bankroll a feature film with a $22-million production budget is obscene ("Following the Book to Success," by Robert W. Welkos, Sept. 18). Whose money is he gambling with? In the acrid wake of terrorist attacks last week, Crouch's son, Matthew, has the audacity to imply that God had a hand in timing the release date of "Megiddo," the semi-biblical film he produced. Matthew Crouch is quoted as saying that "[God] positioned this film to be the answer for a question we didn't even know would be asked."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1999 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Omega Code," a hokey doomsday/millennialist thriller, opens with the murder of an elderly Jewish scholar who has cracked the so-called Bible code--a series of prophecies believed to be encoded in the Torah--by translating the ancient symbols into a sophisticated computer program. The killer swiftly delivers the computer disc and the rabbi's notebook to Stone Alexander (Michael York), a megalomaniac leader based in Rome.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1999 | SCOTT MARTELLE and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A church-based marketing campaign--the kind that usually rallies protesters against the evils of Hollywood--helped make the independent Christian film "The Omega Code" one of the nation's top-grossing movies this week. The film opened in only 300 theaters last weekend but still grossed about $2.5 million, earning more money per screen than "Fight Club," the weekend's top-grossing movie that took in $11 million from nearly 2,000 theaters. "The Omega Code" cost $7.
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