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Matthew Shepard

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1998
When I heard Monday morning that Matthew Shepard had died, a piece of me died with him. All I could think on the way to work was that this kid was someone's son, someone's brother, someone's best friend . . . and he was left on a fence in Wyoming to die, unrecognizable and uncared for, because the state of Wyoming didn't recognize him as a human being with rights. Forget for a moment that Matthew was gay. Matthew was a human being. In this great country, the leader of the free world, we are still lynching and beating people for their differences.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
October 10, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LARAMIE, Wyo. - Every year, the day sneaks on up Judy Shepard to deliver its sucker punch from the past: The 12th of October. The day Matthew died. "It hits you and you say to yourself: Oh, this is the day," she says. "This is why I feel so terrible. " Fifteen years ago this week, gay college student Matthew Shepard was pistol-whipped and left for dead: unconscious, barely alive, lashed to a jagged wooden fence outside this small prairie city by two men disgusted by his homosexuality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1998
The Laugh Factory in West Hollywood will host a candlelight vigil and comedy fund-raiser to remember gay murder victim Matthew Shepard tonight, with proceeds from the event going to a Matthew Shepard Scholarship Fund at the University of Wyoming, where he was a student. The event will begin with a 7:30 p.m. candlelight vigil outside of the Laugh Factory, followed by a show inside the club. Tickets are $10. Information and reservations: (310) 659-2227.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | Matt Cooper
I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change Love and relationships are explored in a series of vignettes in this musical comedy. Crown City Theatre, 11031 Camarillo St., St. Matthew's LGBT Church, North Hollywood.  9/12. 8 p.m. 9/12; 8 p.m. 9/13; 8 p.m. 9/14; 3 p.m. 9/15. Through 10/20. $30. 818-605-5685 Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? West Coast premiere of this adaptation of the Philip K. Dick novel that was also the basis for the noir-ish 1982 sci-fi film "Blade Runner.
OPINION
December 2, 2004
Re "Justice Shouldn't Be Tilted by 'Hate Crimes,' " Commentary, Nov. 26: The opinion JoAnn Wypijewski holds is not quite the one she seems to be arguing for. If she wants to show people what effect hate crime laws have on criminal prosecutions, she should probably find a case from a state that has one. What her article reveals is that it's not hate crime laws she opposes, it's sympathy for victims and their families. That may be a defensible opinion, but she shouldn't use hate crime laws as a cover for it. Wyoming does not have such a law, and what this case reveals is that neither Matthew Shepard's family nor the citizens of Wyoming really needed one. The family's grief and the community's compassion arose on their own. Wypijewski may think that's a shame.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
ABC's newsmagazine "20/20" pitches its hour on Matthew Shepard, airing tonight at 10, as an unflinching, demystifying look at the grisly killing of the gay University of Wyoming student whose death became a symbol of hate and homophobia in contemporary America. The details are stark enough: On Oct. 6, 1998, the 21-year-old Shepard was beaten and left tied to a split-rail fence for 18 hours in the frigid plains outside Laramie. He died five days later.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2003 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Fred Phelps plans to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Matthew Shepard's murder in his own unique style. The 73-year-old Topeka, Kan., pastor has designed a granite monument engraved with Shepard's face followed by these word chiseled in the stone: "Matthew Shepard Entered Hell October 12, 1998, at Age 21 In Defiance of God's Warning: 'Thou shalt not lie with mankind as with womankind; it is abomination.' Leviticus 18:22."
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson plotted to pose as gays and rob Matthew Shepard, and McKinney later acknowledged they had killed him, McKinney's then-girlfriend testified Thursday. McKinney claimed "a gay guy had been hitting on him" in the bar, Kristen Price, 19, told jurors. "They decided in the bathroom to pretend they were gay, get him in the truck and rob him." Later that night, McKinney, covered in blood, returned to their home and told her "he had killed someone," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2002 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After taking aim at "The Sopranos" last year, NBC has again irked Home Box Office officials--this time by scheduling a fact-based movie about the 1998 slaying of gay youth Matthew Shepard to run the same night HBO was going to run its own movie related to that topic. HBO announced a few weeks ago that "The Laramie Project," adapted from Moises Kaufman's stage play based on interviews with townspeople about the much-publicized murder, would premiere March 16.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2001 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg, author of "State of the Arts: California Artists Talk About Their Work," is a regular contributor to Calendar
Moises Kaufman could not turn off the television. He could not put down the newspaper. Like much of America, he was mesmerized by the news of the horrific beating, robbery and eventual death in 1998 of Matthew Shepard, a gay university student attacked and left for dead by two young men near Laramie, Wyo. "For the five days until he died, you couldn't turn on a television or a radio and not hear about it," says the 37-year-old playwright and director. "Matthew Shepard put a face on hate crimes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By David Ng
"The Laramie Project: Ten Years Later" -- the stage sequel to the "The Laramie Project" -- will have its Los Angeles debut run in September at the L.A. Gay and Lesbian Center in Hollywood. The play revisits the citizens of Laramie, Wyo., where Matthew Shepard, a gay college student, was beaten to death in 1998. The "Laramie" sequel debuted in 2009 and has since been performed throughout the country. (The play had its Orange County premiere run in April at the Chance Theatre in Anaheim Hills.)
NATIONAL
May 10, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
Mitt Romney apologized Thursday after a newspaper story described bullying behavior on his part when he was an 18-year-old senior at an elite, all-boys prep school in Michigan. The Washington Post detailed a 1965 incident at Cranbrook School in which a buttoned-down Romney apparently was incensed by the dyed blond locks of a junior known for his "nonconformity and presumed homosexuality. " He led a "posse" of students in a charge against the boy, the Post reported. "He can't look like that," Romney reportedly told a close friend at the time.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
A brutal killing last year brought back ugly memories for the people of Jackson, Miss. Hundreds of people marched in August -- an event reminiscent of the civil rights movement -- after a security camera recording showed that James C. Anderson was beaten and run over by white young adults in June. "There is a lot of general appall over what took place here," Ronnie C. Crudup Sr. told The Times during the march. "We wanted to get well-minded people, both black and white, together to do something to support this family and this country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2011 | Sandy Banks
Neither family was satisfied when the jury deadlocked last week in the trial of an Oxnard teenager charged with murdering a gay middle-school classmate before stunned students in an English class. The parents of the dead boy, Larry King, stormed out of court when the mistrial was announced. The mother of defendant Brandon McInerney buried her face in her hands, slumped and sobbed. The jury was stuck between murder and manslaughter; torn, like much of a troubled public, between competing scenarios: Was Brandon an angry white supremacist who plotted the killing because he despised Larry for being gay?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
The soft whistle of a passing breeze echoed through the performance space. On stage, a group of men swayed against a backdrop of Wyoming's hills, as though they were at the mercy of the wind. They moved faintly side to side, side to side. The image resonated throughout the Monday night performance of "The Laramie Project, Ten Years Later . . . an Epilogue" at the Eli and Edythe Broad Stage. The Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles, which presented the production with Speak Theater Arts and the Broad Stage, opened the show with this rhythmic motion, symbolic of a deeper struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Barbara Isenberg
Last fall, as every fall for 10 years, playwright and director Moisés Kaufman was thinking about the 1998 killing of gay college student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo. Kaufman's Tectonic Theater Project had gone to Laramie just weeks after Shepard's horrific murder, interviewed townspeople and transformed their interview tapes into the well-received "The Laramie Project," produced first as a play and later an HBO film. But fall 2008 had special meaning. "The 10-year anniversary was coming up, and I started thinking about the long-term impact of Matthew's murder," says Kaufman.
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The parents of slain college student Matthew Shepard interceded to save the life of his killer, brokering an eleventh-hour deal that will send Aaron McKinney to prison for life while sparing him the death penalty. As the sentencing phase of the murder trial in Laramie, Wyo., was about to begin Thursday morning, Judge Barton Voigt announced the deal: McKinney, 22, is to serve two consecutive life sentences, has no chance for parole and no opportunity to appeal. Dennis Shepard read a lengthy, emotional statement in court Thursday, calling his 21-year-old gay son his hero and citing his special gift for helping people.
OPINION
August 7, 2009
The Senate has joined the House in expanding the definition of "hate crimes" to include attacks on gays and lesbians. In doing so, however, it attached an amendment that would make some hate crimes punishable by death. Democratic congressional leaders should insist that the provision be removed.
OPINION
December 2, 2004
Re "Justice Shouldn't Be Tilted by 'Hate Crimes,' " Commentary, Nov. 26: The opinion JoAnn Wypijewski holds is not quite the one she seems to be arguing for. If she wants to show people what effect hate crime laws have on criminal prosecutions, she should probably find a case from a state that has one. What her article reveals is that it's not hate crime laws she opposes, it's sympathy for victims and their families. That may be a defensible opinion, but she shouldn't use hate crime laws as a cover for it. Wyoming does not have such a law, and what this case reveals is that neither Matthew Shepard's family nor the citizens of Wyoming really needed one. The family's grief and the community's compassion arose on their own. Wypijewski may think that's a shame.
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