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FOOD
April 8, 2009 | Mary MacVean
The children settle down on the floor of the palace, or what passes for a palace in the Chabad center in Westwood in the frenzied weeks leading up to the Jewish holiday of Passover. Rabbinical student Zalmy Folgerman, playing Pharaoh, dismisses Moses with a borscht belt flourish. "Noses?" he asked. "I don't know a Noses. Bring him a tissue and let him go." Funny guy, this Pharaoh. From the palace, the kindergartners move to a "farm," where they separate kernels from wheat stalks.
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NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Passover begins at sundown Monday (today) and the Transportation Security Administration is assuring fliers that its officers will be sensitive to carry-on items associated with the Jewish holiday. "Some travelers will be carrying boxes of matzo, which are consumed as part of the Passover ritual," the agency said in an April 2 statement . "Matzo can be machine or handmade and are typically very thin and fragile, and break easily. Passengers traveling with religious items, including handmade matzo, may request a hand inspection by the TSO [transportation security officer]
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FOOD
April 14, 2011 | By Phyllis Glazer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I've always loved Passover, ever since I was a little girl. Long before I understood it as the Festival of Freedom that celebrates the ancient Israelites' exodus from slavery in Egypt, to me it was the holiday of difference. Indeed, it was — and still is — a time to join together for a ritual meal called a Seder, at which we ask ourselves: "Why is this night different from all other nights?" One answer could be: because everything tastes like matzo. But that doesn't have to be true.
FOOD
March 23, 2013
  Total time: 1 hour, 10 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Silan, which is sometimes labeled date syrup or date molasses, can be purchased at kosher or Middle Eastern markets. 3 matzos 1 cup water 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons (3 ounces) butter or margarine, divided 2 sweet apples, such as Fuji (about 12 ounces) 4 eggs 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 to 3 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons sugar, divided 3/4 cup (packed) haroset with Bible land fruits (about 6 ounces)
FOOD
March 23, 2013
  Total time: 1 hour, 10 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Silan, which is sometimes labeled date syrup or date molasses, can be purchased at kosher or Middle Eastern markets. 3 matzos 1 cup water 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons (3 ounces) butter or margarine, divided 2 sweet apples, such as Fuji (about 12 ounces) 4 eggs 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 to 3 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons sugar, divided 3/4 cup (packed) haroset with Bible land fruits (about 6 ounces)
FOOD
March 31, 1996 | PHIL ANDRES
In its plainness and simplicity, matzo reminds Jews of harsher times. But it is also a symbol of joy: It represents the Jews' ancient flight to freedom. Their flight from slavery in Egypt was so sudden that there wasn't time to let the bread rise, so they packed unleavened bread. The urgency of the Exodus and the people's suffering in the desert are evoked in each bite of matzo, partly because eating it tends to make one thirsty. But more than that, matzo brings the past alive.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Passover begins at sundown Monday (today) and the Transportation Security Administration is assuring fliers that its officers will be sensitive to carry-on items associated with the Jewish holiday. "Some travelers will be carrying boxes of matzo, which are consumed as part of the Passover ritual," the agency said in an April 2 statement . "Matzo can be machine or handmade and are typically very thin and fragile, and break easily. Passengers traveling with religious items, including handmade matzo, may request a hand inspection by the TSO [transportation security officer]
BUSINESS
April 15, 1990
Maria L. La Ganga made an error in her explanation of why the Passover matzo is different than matzo used on all other nights of the year ("Price of Matzo Fixed, N.J. Indictment Claims," March 21). The removal of a small piece of dough is not unique to Passover or to matzo, as a matter of fact. Rather, it is symbolic of the portion that was removed from all dough, whether bread or matzo, and given to the priests that served in the Holy Temple as one of the forms of community support.
FOOD
March 23, 2013 | By Faye Levy
Haroset , a blend of fruit, nuts and wine, is probably the most popular food of the eight-day holiday of Passover, which begins on Monday night. For the Seder, the feast commemorating the exodus of the Hebrews from Egypt, haroset is spooned onto the Seder plate alongside other symbolic Passover preparations and is served as part of the ritual. Although haroset's brown color is meant to be a sad reminder of the mortar made by the Hebrew slaves, people's faces light up when it's time to sample it. Some Jews prepare extra haroset to use as a spread throughout Passover.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1997 | JASON TERADA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rabbi Yisroel Levine didn't look much like a holy man when he appeared before the room full of kindergarten and preschool students at the Chabad of the Conejo's Westlake center. He was wearing a paper baker's hat and a white apron. And he was ready to make matzo. The group of more than 40 children and parents from Agoura Hills' Temple Beth Haverim came to the Chabad's new Conejo Valley bakery Thursday to help him and to learn more about their Jewish heritage as Passover approaches.
FOOD
March 23, 2013 | By Faye Levy
Haroset , a blend of fruit, nuts and wine, is probably the most popular food of the eight-day holiday of Passover, which begins on Monday night. For the Seder, the feast commemorating the exodus of the Hebrews from Egypt, haroset is spooned onto the Seder plate alongside other symbolic Passover preparations and is served as part of the ritual. Although haroset's brown color is meant to be a sad reminder of the mortar made by the Hebrew slaves, people's faces light up when it's time to sample it. Some Jews prepare extra haroset to use as a spread throughout Passover.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Latkes have soul, particularly this classic version from cookbook author Phyllis Glazer, made from grated potatoes, eggs and matzo meal and not much else. It's adapted from "The Essential Book of Jewish Festival Cooking. " Classic potato latkes is one of the favorite recipes we've collected in our "Los Angeles Times Holiday Handbook. " The book shares more than 110 seasonal recipes to help you celebrate Thanksgiving, Hanukkah , Christmas and New Year's. We've also updated last year's "Los Angeles Times Holiday Cookies," so it now includes 65 recipes from a wide range of sources, including world-famous pastry chefs and home cooks.
FOOD
March 31, 2012 | By Faye Levy, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When I married into a Yemenite family in Israel more than 40 years ago, it raised some eyebrows. Since my family was of Polish and Russian origin, I was embracing a different culture, including foods that were unlike the Ashkenazi ones I had grown up with. When the Jews are classified into two broad groups, my in-laws count as Sephardim - Jews from Mediterranean and Middle Eastern lands. In Israel, such "mixed marriages" of Ashkenazim and Sephardim have become much more common, and this is naturally reflected in today's Passover menus.
FOOD
March 31, 2012
Herb-flecked kneidelach (matzo balls) Total time: 1 hour, 15 minutes, plus chilling time Servings: This makes about 24 matzo balls. 3 eggs 1 tablespoon vegetable oil such as grapeseed or safflower oil 2/3 cup matzo meal (sometimes labeled matsah meal) (about 2½ ounces) 1/2 teaspoon salt, more as needed 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper 3 cups plus 5 tablespoons strained chicken soup (or prepared chicken or vegetable broth or water)
BUSINESS
March 29, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Is this a buy sign for bread crumbs? Billionaire Warren Buffett purchased bread crumbs -- and just about anything else that has wheat and the other grains forbidden to Jews during the observance of Passover -- from a local rabbi, Jonathan Gross of Beth Israel Synagogue in Omaha, Neb. It is ritual that goes on worldwide in Jewish communities. Families designate rabbis to find a non-Jew such as Buffett to purchase their chametz, or food made with leavening, before the holiday.
FOOD
April 14, 2011 | By Phyllis Glazer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I've always loved Passover, ever since I was a little girl. Long before I understood it as the Festival of Freedom that celebrates the ancient Israelites' exodus from slavery in Egypt, to me it was the holiday of difference. Indeed, it was — and still is — a time to join together for a ritual meal called a Seder, at which we ask ourselves: "Why is this night different from all other nights?" One answer could be: because everything tastes like matzo. But that doesn't have to be true.
FOOD
April 4, 1993 | Barbara Hansen
During Passover, Jews eat only unleavened bread and avoid anything that contains flour. Of course, matzo is made from flour, but matzo, matzo farfel (broken bits), matzo meal and cake meal for Passover are made from flour that is supervised from the field to the factory to ensure against accidental fermentation. Manufacturers like Manischevitz clearly state on packages that the product is either suitable for Passover or "not for Passover use."
FOOD
May 4, 1995
What a lovely holiday (Easter/Passover/Spring) edition (April 9). In the interest of unity and symbols, it would have been interesting to add to Lorna Sass' history of the Easter egg that Christ's Last Supper was the Passover meal. Since the egg is used as an important rebirth symbol, as noted in other articles--same edition--isn't it possible that the custom to commemorate the events came from Christ's last meal--egg and all? --B. KAYE, Los Angeles I read with interest Greta Beigel's article on matzo balls (April 13)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2009 | Jessica Gelt
Quick, when you see the word "Gorbals," what comes to mind? A deadly disease from the Middle Ages (as in: Egad, he's got the gorbals!)? A cuddly but vicious gorilla-gerbil hybrid? Or a new restaurant in downtown L.A. named after a neighborhood in Glasgow, Scotland, that was once home to much of the city's Jewish population? As much as you might be inclined to think the former two, the answer is actually the latter. The restaurant, which opened Friday, is the oddball creation of Ilan Hall, Season 2's winner of "Top Chef."
FOOD
April 8, 2009 | Mary MacVean
The children settle down on the floor of the palace, or what passes for a palace in the Chabad center in Westwood in the frenzied weeks leading up to the Jewish holiday of Passover. Rabbinical student Zalmy Folgerman, playing Pharaoh, dismisses Moses with a borscht belt flourish. "Noses?" he asked. "I don't know a Noses. Bring him a tissue and let him go." Funny guy, this Pharaoh. From the palace, the kindergartners move to a "farm," where they separate kernels from wheat stalks.
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