Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMaurice Allais
IN THE NEWS

Maurice Allais

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 26, 1989 | Dan Fisher and Rone Tempest, The questions in the following interview were posed by Los Angeles Times London bureau chief Dan Fisher. Allais' responses were translated from the French by Times Paris bureau chief Rone Tempest in consultation with the economist.
L oose credit practices, insufficient margin requirements and computerized trading on a nonstop world market have produced the volatile climate that now characterizes Wall Street, French economist Maurice Allais said in an interview with The Times. "Wall Street has become a veritable casino," said Allais, 78, a market theorist who won the 1988 Nobel Prize for economics. "In fact, the weaknesses of Wall Street today are the same as those that led to the crash of 1929.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 26, 1989 | Dan Fisher and Rone Tempest, The questions in the following interview were posed by Los Angeles Times London bureau chief Dan Fisher. Allais' responses were translated from the French by Times Paris bureau chief Rone Tempest in consultation with the economist.
L oose credit practices, insufficient margin requirements and computerized trading on a nonstop world market have produced the volatile climate that now characterizes Wall Street, French economist Maurice Allais said in an interview with The Times. "Wall Street has become a veritable casino," said Allais, 78, a market theorist who won the 1988 Nobel Prize for economics. "In fact, the weaknesses of Wall Street today are the same as those that led to the crash of 1929.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | Associated Press
Maurice Allais, a Paris shopkeeper's son who became a giant of economic theory, won the Nobel Prize for economics today for theories on markets and prices that helped rebuild France's economy after World War II. Allais, 77, developed formulas to make it possible for large enterprises, particularly public ones, to keep an economy in balance by regulating prices and allocating their resources.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1988 | Associated Press
Maurice Allais, a Paris shopkeeper's son who became a "giant" of economic theory, won the Nobel Prize for economics Tuesday. Allais, 77, developed formulas to make it possible for large enterprises, particularly public ones, to keep a nation's economy in balance by regulating prices and allocating resources. His theories on markets and prices helped rebuild France's economy after World War II.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 81-year-old economist from the University of Chicago, whose Depression-era tour of American factories led him to discover that it costs money to bargain over any transaction, was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics on Tuesday. The theories developed by British-born Ronald Coase, a professor emeritus at the university's law school, were described by the Nobel committee as the economic equivalent of discovering new particles of matter.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of U.N. peacekeeping troops Saturday and said their success illustrates a new mood of understanding and common sense in the world. But Perez de Cuellar also said the peacekeepers' crucial mission is threatened because the United States and other nations don't pay their dues to the world body.
NEWS
October 10, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While Elliott Wave theorists track human events through the ages to make their economic forecasts, one Orange County group takes an even less conventional approach: It bases its predictions on such indicators as weather patterns and the animal population. The Foundation for the Study of Cycles is an Irvine group whose following includes investors, stock analysts, even a Nobel prize-winning economist, Maurice Allais.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three American economists, including a Stanford University professor whose work helped lay the foundation for creation of mutual funds and advanced the understanding of financial markets, were jointly awarded the Nobel memorial prize in economics Tuesday. Professors William F. Sharpe of Stanford, Harry F. Markowitz of City University of New York and Merton H. Miller of the University of Chicago, will share in the $700,000 prize from the Swedish Academy of Sciences.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1992 Nobel Prize for economics has been awarded to Gary S. Becker, a University of Chicago professor who has used economic theory as a key to explore riddles about families, the work force, crime, discrimination and other social issues, the Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Tuesday. Becker, a professor of economics and sociology whose work was once shunned by the academic Establishment, was awarded the $1.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|