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Maurice Greene

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June 26, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
EUGENE, Ore. — Maurice Greene , a four-time Olympic sprint medalist and five-time world champion, never lacked titles or ego. But he said a race to break the deadlock between Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh for the final U.S. women's 100-meter berth at the London Games would eclipse any of his grudge matches, including his 200-meter showdown against Michael Johnson at the 2000 U.S. Olympic trials. "This will supersede every other race," Greene said Tuesday, a day off in this year's trials.
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SPORTS
June 26, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
EUGENE, Ore. — Maurice Greene , a four-time Olympic sprint medalist and five-time world champion, never lacked titles or ego. But he said a race to break the deadlock between Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh for the final U.S. women's 100-meter berth at the London Games would eclipse any of his grudge matches, including his 200-meter showdown against Michael Johnson at the 2000 U.S. Olympic trials. "This will supersede every other race," Greene said Tuesday, a day off in this year's trials.
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SPORTS
May 8, 2005 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
If only Maurice Greene hadn't let up. If only he had run through his Olympic 100-meter semifinal heat, instead of easing up and placing third. If he'd won the heat, he would have had a middle lane in the final and wouldn't have been, as he said, "running blind" in Lane 7.
SPORTS
February 11, 2008 | Helene Elliott
He never ran a race he didn't think he could win, and Maurice Greene competed against time and age as valiantly as he could. His spirit was willing. But his muscles and tendons, taxed by years of propelling him out of the starting blocks and driving him faster than almost any human has run, would carry him no more.
SPORTS
June 14, 1995 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As usual at the U.S. outdoor track and field championships, several of the world's fastest men will compete this week, 100-meter runners such as two-time Olympic champion Carl Lewis, world-record holder Leroy Burrell, top-ranked Dennis Mitchell . . . and Maurice Greene. If you're asking, "Who is Maurice Greene?" you're not alone.
SPORTS
August 21, 2004
This is perhaps the Olympics' most glamorous track and field event, with the fastest performer often referred to as the world's fastest human. Maurice Greene, former world record holder and 2000 Olympic champion is among the favorites in this year's event, which starts today.
SPORTS
August 2, 2002 | From staff reports
Maurice Greene, the reigning Olympic and world champion in the 100 meters, will join the Woodland Hills Taft High track program as an assistant coach. Taft earlier hired 1992 Olympic gold medalist Quincy Watts, an alumnus, as head coach. Greene, who lives in Granada Hills and set the world record at 9.79 seconds in 1999, approached Watts about helping coach the sprinters. "When you have the fastest man in the world who wants to help coach, what can you say?" Watts said.
SPORTS
August 6, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First, Maurice Greene felt a pinch in his left quadriceps. A stride later, with about 15 meters left in his quest for his third consecutive 100 meters world championship, Greene felt his hamstring twang. But worst of all, he felt the hot breath of U.S. teammate Tim Montgomery, who had brashly predicted he would bring about Greene's downfall. "When I'm in a race like that," Greene said, "I'm going to have to kill myself before I'd stop. When you want something so bad, you have to fight to get it."
SPORTS
September 2, 2000 | Associated Press
Maurice Greene ran the fastest 100 meters of the year, winning in 9.86 seconds Friday at the ISTAF meet, the last major track and field competition before the Sydney Olympics. Marion Jones won the women's 100, finishing in 10.78 to match her world-leading season-best that she ran in London on Aug. 5. Both marks broke meet records. Greene, who had the previous meet record at 9.94, got a fast start out of the blocks and won by a large margin over fellow American Jon Drummond, who finished in 9.96.
SPORTS
July 1, 2002 | From Associated Press
Dwain Chambers beat world record-holder Maurice Greene for the second time in 48 hours, winning the 100 meters Sunday at the IAAF Norwich Union Grand Prix Classic. Chambers followed his victory over Greene at the Bislett Games in Oslo on Friday by leading a British sweep of the top three spots. Chambers stormed out of the blocks to lead the Olympic and world champion at 50 meters and finished with a winning time of 9.95 seconds.
SPORTS
June 26, 2005 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
The public drama at the U.S. track and field championships was exhilarating. Three U.S. women broke 50 seconds in the same 400-meter race for the first time Saturday, Jeremy Wariner recovered from an early stumble to run a world-leading 44.20 seconds and add the 400 title to his Olympic gold medal, and Me'Lisa Barber continued her surprising progress by winning the women's 100, an event she skipped the last three years. The private drama was poignant, born of misfortune.
SPORTS
June 15, 2005 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Merely five years after he took up running, Jamaica's Asafa Powell has earned the title of world's fastest man. The soft-spoken 22-year-old on Tuesday set a world record of 9.77 seconds for the 100 meters, trimming one-hundredth of a second off the time Tim Montgomery ran in Paris in September 2002. Powell's performance on the Athens Olympic track, where last year he finished fifth at the Summer Games in 9.
SPORTS
May 8, 2005 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
If only Maurice Greene hadn't let up. If only he had run through his Olympic 100-meter semifinal heat, instead of easing up and placing third. If he'd won the heat, he would have had a middle lane in the final and wouldn't have been, as he said, "running blind" in Lane 7.
SPORTS
August 22, 2004 | Helene Elliott; Diane Pucin; Steve Springer
Here, in capsule form, are the events that will be highlighted today in Athens: Track and Field The world's fastest man and best female distance runner will be crowned. In the men's 100-meter dash, defending gold medalist Maurice Greene has a season-best mark of 9.91, second only to Shawn Crawford's 9.88. In the women's marathon, Britain's Paula Radcliffe, the world-record holder, is the favorite, but Margaret Okayo, Catherine Ndereba and Alice Chelangat of Kenya should also contend.
SPORTS
August 21, 2004
This is perhaps the Olympics' most glamorous track and field event, with the fastest performer often referred to as the world's fastest human. Maurice Greene, former world record holder and 2000 Olympic champion is among the favorites in this year's event, which starts today.
SPORTS
August 11, 2004 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
American athletes have been cautioned against extravagant flag-waving at these Olympics, and it has been suggested that they nix any ideas of using the flag as a headband, or as a cape, or as any other kind of celebration prop. Maurice Greene apparently wasn't listening.
SPORTS
August 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
For more than two years, sprinter Maurice Greene has been the advertising face of the Goodwill Games in Australia, shown on billboards and in television commercials ready to burst from the starting blocks. As it turns out, that's about as close as he'll get to running the 100-meter race. The marquee attraction and world record-holder pulled out of the event today and canceled all on-track engagements for the rest of the season because of a leg injury.
SPORTS
May 31, 2002 | Helene Elliott
The world's fastest man took it slow for five months. But Maurice Greene, refreshed and no longer plagued by tendinitis or leg injuries, said Thursday he's ready to renew his assault on track's record books. Greene, the Sydney Olympic gold medalist and three-time world champion in the 100 meters, said he will compete in a Grand Prix meet at Athens on June 10, in seven Golden League meets in Europe and in the U.S. outdoor championships next month in Palo Alto.
SPORTS
July 12, 2004 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Maurice Greene released a shriek of joy and pointed to the tattoo on his right biceps, a stylized lion whose mane shelters the letters GOAT, for Greatest of All Time. It was his only redundant move of the day. His 9.91-second victory Sunday in the 100-meter dash at the Olympic trials had certified his place among the most resilient and intriguing champions this troubled sport has seen, no matter the illustration on his body.
SPORTS
June 20, 2004 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Shawn Crawford was still catching his breath, still savoring his 100-meter dash victory at the Prefontaine Classic in a scorching 9.88 seconds, when Maurice Greene extended a hand in congratulations. "Nice run," Greene said. He then paused for dramatic effect, looked over his shoulder and added, "Three weeks." Message sent. Challenge accepted. Three weeks' time is when they'll meet again, at the U.S. Olympic trials in Sacramento.
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