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Maurice Sendak

ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Here we go again. The wonders of a great opera are compromised by gimmickry. A meddlesome director and designer refuse to trust the composer. The procedure has become all too familiar. In some instances, re-creational modernists manage to violate the letter of the original law, yet still illuminate the spirit. That's terrific. Other second-guessers are so intent on imposing their own irrelevant vision on the piece at hand that they distort or even destroy the intended dramatic impulses.
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MAGAZINE
September 16, 1990 | PAUL CIOTTI, Paul Ciotti is a Los Angeles Times Magazine staff writer.
IT'S LATE AFTERNOON in a brightly lit dressing room in the basement of the Los Angeles Music Center, and Maurice Sendak is slumped wearily in a chair, overseeing the fittings of chorus costumes for next week's opening of "Idomeneo." Suddenly, a young man with dark hair and glasses, the last fitting of the day, announces to the half-dozen costume fitters and wardrobe attendants that the open-front sailor's jerkin they've put on him is totally unacceptable.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Ah, whimsy. Wistful whimsy. Sophisticated whimsy. Eager whimsy. Whimsy with a message. Whimsy with a dark edge. Whimsy with hustling, bustling modern music bearing occasional in-jokes and clever quotations. Ah, children's whimsy designed for grown-ups. Heavy-handed whimsy. Whimsy that loses something, perhaps, in translation from page to stage. Whimsy that tends, in any case, to get a bit ponderous in the vast open spaces of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1990 | MARK SWED
Directions to Maurice Sendak's house here are a little intimidating. Over the phone, Sendak describes at great length country dirt roads with no identification, hard-to-see turns and easy-to-miss landmarks. On a rainy, foggy May day, the 90-minute drive from Manhattan puts one in mind of those mysterious journeys to a weird land Sendak's characters regularly take, especially Max's voyage in Sendak's popular children's book, "Where the Wild Things Are." What wild thing lies at voyage's end?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The program magazine at the Civic Theatre on Saturday heralded Mozart's "Magic Flute." But the San Diego Opera presented no such thing. For better or worse--probably worse--this was "Die Zauberflote." It was performed with even more German dialogue than one normally encounters in American houses. Ironically, there wasn't a single German on the stage. There cannot have been many Germans out front.
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