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Max Factor Museum Of Beauty

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV
Sally Rand liked Max Factor. She even took her clothes off for him. But it was all very innocent. There's a picture of the disrobing at Hollywood's Max Factor Museum of Beauty, which had been on the brink of closing but won a three-year reprieve Wednesday. In the 1931 photo, the stripper took off her ostrich feathers so one of Factor's white-coated technicians could paint her famous body with zig-zag stripes. Those were the days . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996
Outraged that Procter & Gamble Co. plans to sell the landmark Max Factor building and its museum collection, some Hollywood locals staged a demonstration Thursday outside the building. Procter & Gamble has agreed to sell the building to developer Donelle Dadigan for $1.15 million, said Ed Rider, chief archivist for Procter & Gamble. Dadigan said she intends to lease most of the building to the Museum of Hollywood History, an archive that is to open when the sale is completed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Frankenstein's monster visited the Max Factor Beauty Museum on Saturday, carrying a "wild child" in a cage. They did not come in for a make-over. Like the bogus Charlie Chaplin, the ersatz "mayor of Hollywood," and the "world's only live cigar store Indian," they had come to protest the imminent demise of a genuine relic of movie capital history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV
Sally Rand liked Max Factor. She even took her clothes off for him. But it was all very innocent. There's a picture of the disrobing at Hollywood's Max Factor Museum of Beauty, which had been on the brink of closing but won a three-year reprieve Wednesday. In the 1931 photo, the stripper took off her ostrich feathers so one of Factor's white-coated technicians could paint her famous body with zig-zag stripes. Those were the days . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996
Outraged that Procter & Gamble Co. plans to sell the landmark Max Factor building and its museum collection, some Hollywood locals staged a demonstration Thursday outside the building. Procter & Gamble has agreed to sell the building to developer Donelle Dadigan for $1.15 million, said Ed Rider, chief archivist for Procter & Gamble. Dadigan said she intends to lease most of the building to the Museum of Hollywood History, an archive that is to open when the sale is completed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Max Factor Beauty Museum in Hollywood, faced with imminent closure, was granted a 60-day reprieve Friday as Procter & Gamble Co. officials agreed to requests from Los Angeles political leaders and community activists to consider proposals to keep the popular attraction open.
MAGAZINE
September 22, 1991 | KAREN GRIGSBY BATES
When you step into the Max Factor Museum of Beauty, you're transported to a Hollywood where drop-dead elegance was the norm, not the exception: The Art Deco building is a paean to the pursuit of cosmetic perfection and a memorial to the man who made that pursuit his life's work. Originally a wig maker to Nicholas II, Max Factor came to Los Angeles in 1909 and was soon formulating makeup for the fledgling film industry.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a deal combining the smell of greasepaint and the color of money, consumer products giant Procter & Gamble agreed to spend $1.14 billion on Revlon's historic Max Factor & Co. as well as Revlon's German cosmetics subsidiary, the two companies announced Wednesday.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | GAILE ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are tours of dead stars' homes, semi-stars' condos, underwater coral reefs and graveyards. There is even a tour for insomniacs. But where is the fashion tour of Los Angeles? The local landmarks of style don't show up on any maps we've seen. So come on along--watch your step at the fold--to the places where the stars shop, to the home of the topless bathing suit, to the garages that served as launch pads for great labels, to the shops that have known a dozen incarnations.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Nudelman is a gadfly. Not the kind that bites livestock but a person who annoys others or rouses them from complacency, all in the interest of preserving gritty old Hollywood. When not on the phone at his tiny but historico-politically correct apartment ($600 a month, built in 1927), he is buzzing around city offices or casting a quizzical eye on Hollywood Boulevard's bums, punks and tourists from the ticket booth at the Guinness World of Records Museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Max Factor Beauty Museum in Hollywood, faced with imminent closure, was granted a 60-day reprieve Friday as Procter & Gamble Co. officials agreed to requests from Los Angeles political leaders and community activists to consider proposals to keep the popular attraction open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Frankenstein's monster visited the Max Factor Beauty Museum on Saturday, carrying a "wild child" in a cage. They did not come in for a make-over. Like the bogus Charlie Chaplin, the ersatz "mayor of Hollywood," and the "world's only live cigar store Indian," they had come to protest the imminent demise of a genuine relic of movie capital history.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dave Barry would like to take this opportunity to introduce himself. You know, Dave Barry--the most famous Pulitzer Prize-winning humor columnist and best-selling author a whole heck of a lot of people have never heard of. "Dave Barry? I've heard of J. J. Barry." That's David Campagna, a beefy sort whose mission it is to distribute free tickets to, well, something else a lot of people have never heard of, a new late-night show called "Studio 59."
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | KATHRYN BOLD, Kathryn Bold is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
During a 1920s press conference with Max Factor, a reporter approached the legendary Hollywood makeup man and remarked, "How wonderful for you to be involved in makeup--it's an art." "It isn't art," replied the man who had no such illusions about cosmetics. "It's a business." Time proved Max Factor right. Worldwide cosmetics sales are expected to top $18 billion in 1990. "He knew back then," says Robert Salvatore, beauty director and curator of the Max Factor Museum of Beauty in Hollywood.
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