Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMaxine Hong Kingston
IN THE NEWS

Maxine Hong Kingston

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On a Friday afternoon in early winter, Maxine Hong Kingston sips a cup of green tea at a table in her kitchen and ponders the fluidity of her work. Outside, the light is hazy, white-blue and diffuse. Down the hill there's a stunning bay view, the water choppy and alive. At moments such as this, sea and air, land and sky seem to blend, as if vision alone were insufficient to frame the borders of the world. Kingston's seventh book, "I Love a Broad Margin to My Life" (Alfred A. Knopf: 232 pp., $24.95)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On a Friday afternoon in early winter, Maxine Hong Kingston sips a cup of green tea at a table in her kitchen and ponders the fluidity of her work. Outside, the light is hazy, white-blue and diffuse. Down the hill there's a stunning bay view, the water choppy and alive. At moments such as this, sea and air, land and sky seem to blend, as if vision alone were insufficient to frame the borders of the world. Kingston's seventh book, "I Love a Broad Margin to My Life" (Alfred A. Knopf: 232 pp., $24.95)
Advertisement
BOOKS
July 2, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Maxine Hong Kingston blends personal memory, family history and fantasy in this impressionistic autobiography, which won a National Book Critic's Circle Award in 1976. A first-generation American, Kingston describes the conflict between her emerging Western identity and the submissive behavior her Chinese-born parents expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2011
Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. SUNDAY Maile Meloy : The author of "Both Ways Is the Only Way I Want It" will discuss and sign her recent collection of short stories as part of the Autry Book Club. Autry National Center, 4700 Western Heritage Way, L.A. 2 p.m. Free for book club members; $15 for non-members. (323) 667-2000, Ext. 391. Poetry Behind the Fence: Poets Prison Panel : Luivette Resto will host an evening of readings by Robert Juarez, Rolando Ortiz, Hugo Machuca, Melinda Palacio and Luis J. Rodriguez.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | DIANNE KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
Standing amid the messy stacks of literature at Dutton's Books, back to the cash register, author Maxine Hong Kingston was facing her readers in Brentwood. She crinkled her eyes at them, smiling as she sized them up. They were men and women, a mix of young hip and middle-aged settled, and most were clutching a newly autographed copy of "Tripmaster Monkey." Many of them, too, were toting Kingston's earlier books, "China Men" and "The Woman Warrior." Some of them sipped champagne from plastic glasses, and all of them were sizing up Kingston, the diminutive storyteller-myth maker-novelist in their midst.
BOOKS
April 23, 1989 | Gerald Vizenor, Vizenor teaches at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is the author of "Griever: An American Monkey King in China" (Fiction Collective). and
"Got no money. Got no home. Got story," says Wittman Ah Sing in this fantastic novel by Maxine Hong Kingston. Ah Sing is an unemployed writer who encounters the '60s on a cultural rebound, a Chinese American determined to complete an ancestral Gold Mountain trunk with his wild stories. "I can't die until I fill it with poems and play-acts." He lives in San Francisco as a splendid incarnation of the Monkey King from the popular 16th-Century fiction, "The Journey to the West." Kingston is the author of "The Woman Warrior," which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and "China Men," winner of the National Book Award for nonfiction.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | EDWARD IWATA, Ed Iwata is a San Francisco writer and a frequent contributor to View
Last spring, a small circle of writers and scholars eagerly pored over a new book by Maxine Hong Kingston, the best-selling author of "The Woman Warrior" and "China Men." They knew Kingston had wrestled with the manuscript for years. A few even had heard she wrote the book, in part, to defend herself against her longtime literary foe, Frank Chin, a combative writer and the first Asian-American to have his plays staged in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
This year's National Book Awards, taking place in New York on Nov. 19, will include a Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters to Maxine Hong Kingston. The Oakland-based Kingston, whose books include the memoir "The Woman Warrior," was awarded the Robert Kirsch Award for Lifetime Achievement at the Los Angeles Times Book Festival in April. The awards also will recognize Barney Rosset, former publisher of the Evergreen Review and Grove Press, with the Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community.
NEWS
July 1, 1990
I am sad to learn about the warfare between these two Asian-American literary giants. Ever since they immigrated to America, Asians have not had an equal footing with whites. This situation is even more pronounced in the literary world. Since Frank Chin and Maxine Hong Kingston have achieved success and have won acceptance (as writers), they ought to act as role models for the young Asian-Americans and encourage them to pursue a career in this less popular field among Asians. It is unhealthy for Chin and Kingston to continue bickering.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1989 | MARY HELEN BERG
Gov. George Deukmejian will recognize nine California artists, arts patrons and community leaders for significant contributions to the arts with the first Governor's Awards for the Arts, the California Arts Council announced Wednesday. The annual awards, sponsored by the council, will be presented by the governor and Mrs. Deukmejian at a black-tie fund-raiser on Nov. 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
This year's National Book Awards, taking place in New York on Nov. 19, will include a Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters to Maxine Hong Kingston. The Oakland-based Kingston, whose books include the memoir "The Woman Warrior," was awarded the Robert Kirsch Award for Lifetime Achievement at the Los Angeles Times Book Festival in April. The awards also will recognize Barney Rosset, former publisher of the Evergreen Review and Grove Press, with the Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community.
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Michael Frank, Michael Frank is a contributing writer to Book Review.
"The Fifth Book of Peace," Maxine Hong Kingston's first new book in more than a decade, is a hybrid of memoir, fiction and (the last term comes less fluidly) writing-group-verging-on-group-therapy reportage.
BOOKS
January 7, 2001 | THOMAS SANCHEZ, Thomas Sanchez is the author of "Rabbit Boss," "Zoot-Suit Murders," "Mile Zero" and, most recently, "Day of the Bees."
A journalist recently asked me in an interview, "What is your inspiration as a California writer?" Unhesitatingly I answered, "Jack's pigs." "What do you mean, Jack's pigs?" "Come with me, I'll show them to you." I drove the puzzled journalist across the Golden Gate Bridge into the deep country, where high atop a knoll studded with oak trees stands a formidable stone house, now a museum. Inside, a scratchy old home movie was playing on a video monitor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1995 | Pilar Viladas, Pilar Viladas is a San Francisco-based writer
'When I think of commitment," says writer Maxine Hong Kingston, "I think of decades." Which is a good thing, because it must have seemed as if it might take that long for "The Woman Warrior"--Deborah Rogin's adaptation of Kingston's award-winning semi-autobiographical books "The Woman Warrior" (1976) and "China Men" (1980)--to reach the stage.
NEWS
July 1, 1990
The point of Edward Iwata's article describing the feud between Asian-American writers Maxine Hong Kingston and Frank Chin ("Word Warriors," June 24) was well-taken. It struck me as a fitting parallel to the overwhelming alienation that dominates the power struggle between the sexes in our society today. As a writer, I can appreciate the courage and dedication both authors share to commit their visions to paper. Both have been willing to face and rename the ghosts and demons of their Chinese souls.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | EDWARD IWATA, Ed Iwata is a San Francisco writer and a frequent contributor to View
Last spring, a small circle of writers and scholars eagerly pored over a new book by Maxine Hong Kingston, the best-selling author of "The Woman Warrior" and "China Men." They knew Kingston had wrestled with the manuscript for years. A few even had heard she wrote the book, in part, to defend herself against her longtime literary foe, Frank Chin, a combative writer and the first Asian-American to have his plays staged in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2011
Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. SUNDAY Maile Meloy : The author of "Both Ways Is the Only Way I Want It" will discuss and sign her recent collection of short stories as part of the Autry Book Club. Autry National Center, 4700 Western Heritage Way, L.A. 2 p.m. Free for book club members; $15 for non-members. (323) 667-2000, Ext. 391. Poetry Behind the Fence: Poets Prison Panel : Luivette Resto will host an evening of readings by Robert Juarez, Rolando Ortiz, Hugo Machuca, Melinda Palacio and Luis J. Rodriguez.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|