Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMaya Angelou
IN THE NEWS

Maya Angelou

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
The National Book Foundation has announced that Maya Angelou is this year's recipient of the Literarian Award, an honorary National Book Award for contributions to the literary community. Over Angelou's 50-plus years as a writer and poet, she has won many awards -- including three Grammys, the National Medal of Arts, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and over 30 honorary degrees -- but the Literarian Award could be considered her first major literary prize. In a phone interview with the Associated Press after the announcement Thursday, Angelou said the prize made her feel like she was "picking in high cotton.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Dec. 8 - 14, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies       SERIES The Blacklist Tom (Ryan Eggold) insists he's innocent and tells Liz (Megan Boone) he wants the box turned in to the FBI so his name can be cleared while Red (James Spader) tells Liz that a deadly - and beautiful - corporate terrorist (Margarita Levieva)
Advertisement
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
Renowned poet, activist and teacher Maya Angelou explores the importance and the impact of faith in people's lives in the new PBS special "Maya Angelou: Rainbow in the Clouds," airing Friday. The one-hour documentary follows Angelou's visit inside San Francisco's rough Tenderloin district, where she goes inside Glide Memorial Church, which has an ethnically and economically diverse Methodist congregation. She also briefly attends Mount Zion Baptist Church in Winston-Salem, N.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On Wednesday night, the National Book Awards were presented at a black-tie dinner at Cipriani Wall Street in Manhattan. “The Oscars of the Book World,” host Mika Brzezinski called it, although, as Fran Lebowitz once sniffed, “It's the Oscars without money.” Brzezinski and Lebowitz represent what we might call the two opposing poles of the National Book Awards: celebrity and literature. Over the last decade or so - since a celebrated dust-up over the 2004 fiction finalists, only one of which had sold more than 2,000 copies - the National Book Foundation, which administers the prizes, has made a concerted effort to make them more high profile, more accessible, more fun. Don't get me wrong: I'm not suggesting that this has dumbed down the National Book Awards; just the contrary, in fact.
OPINION
January 17, 1993 | Gayle Pollard Terry, Gayle Pollard Terry is an editorial writer for The Times. She interviewed Maya Angelou in the poet's home
On Inauguration Day to herald his presidency, Bill Clinton has chosen a fellow Arkansan to recite a dedicatory poem created for this august occasion. The poet shares Clinton's humble beginnings, his small-town roots and his enduring passion for the written word. Maya Angelou personifies the phoenix-like rise that this young, President is promising a divided nation. She retreated into silence after being raped as a child.
BOOKS
April 13, 1986 | Wanda Coleman, Coleman is a free-lance writer and performance artist. and
Celebrity autobiographies? Ugh! Too many are self-aggrandizements and/or flushed-out elaborations of scanty press packets. Titillation and allusion shape the redundant seduction of the reader already seduced by fame. Confessions and pseudo-confessions are often embarrassingly hollow and juiceless. Rare are the weighty sojourns into soul/self or the rich evocations of an era. Too often sanitizing the past for public consumption is meticulously done to the point of tedium.
OPINION
December 6, 1992
Tremors of your network cause kings to disappear. Your open mouth in anger makes nations bow in fear. Your bombs can change the seasons, obliterate the spring. What more do you long for? Why are you suffering? You control the human lives in Rome and Timbuktu. Lonely nomads wandering owe Telstar to you. Seas shift at your bidding, Your mushrooms fill the sky. Why are you unhappy? Why do your children cry? They kneel alone in terror with dread in every glance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1997 | PAUL LOEB, Paul Loeb is a Seattle writer and the author of "Generation at the Crossroads" (Rutgers University Press, 1996)
Maybe inaugurations get the poets they deserve. Four years ago, Maya Angelou stirred people's hearts with "On the Pulse of Morning." The rock of the past, she said, gives us neither haven nor hiding place in its shadow, but we can gain strength from its weight to face our destiny. We need, she said, to live beyond the "bloody sear" of cynicism. She urged us to face our history with courage. Angelou's message of hope seemed to fit.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1996 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world knows Maya Angelou as President Clinton's favorite poet and the award-winning author of the autobiographical novel "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings." But Scamp Records wants us to know her as the calypso singer whose 1957 album, "Miss Calypso," was reissued this week by the tiny, New York-based label. It's tempting, after seeing the album cover, to dismiss the collection as a spoof--maybe something from Spy magazine.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Showing talents in comedy as well as verse, Maya Angelou celebrated African-American poetry before an audience of about 2,000 at Pepperdine University Wednesday night. During her 90-minute performance, attended by a multiethnic assembly of students, alumni and fans from all over Southern California, Angelou recited her work and that of others. She encouraged the audience "to make this country more than it is today." She urged students to ask librarians for the poetry of African-Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
The National Book Foundation has announced that Maya Angelou is this year's recipient of the Literarian Award, an honorary National Book Award for contributions to the literary community. Over Angelou's 50-plus years as a writer and poet, she has won many awards -- including three Grammys, the National Medal of Arts, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and over 30 honorary degrees -- but the Literarian Award could be considered her first major literary prize. In a phone interview with the Associated Press after the announcement Thursday, Angelou said the prize made her feel like she was "picking in high cotton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
City Councilwoman Jan Perry endorsed Eric Garcetti to be Los Angeles' next mayor on Thursday, saying her support was prompted by two factors - Garcetti's track record in his city council district and sending a message to the special interests that poured millions of dollars into supporting City Controller Wendy Greuel in the mayoral primary. “It would have been easy for me to sit on the sidelines and let the chips fall where they may,” after coming in fourth in the primary, Perry said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Highlighting the importance of the African American vote in the May 21 mayoral runoff, Wendy Greuel and Eric Garcetti held dueling news conferences in South Los Angeles on Thursday to tout new endorsements from highly sought black leaders. At various points, some of the participants even got a little testy. Basketball legend Magic Johnson backed Greuel, saying that he selected the city controller because of her broad range of experience in the public and private sectors, her longtime ties to the African American community and the historic nature of her candidacy to be the city's first female mayor.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2011 | By Julie Mianecki, Los Angeles Times
President Obama awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Tuesday to former President George H.W. Bush and 14 others, including poet Maya Angelou, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, investor Warren Buffett and basketball legend Bill Russell. The medal is the nation's highest civilian honor and is awarded to individuals who have made significant contributions "to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama will honor a baseball hall of famer, the German head of state, a billionaire philanthropist and one of his predecessors with the nation's highest civilian honor, the White House announced Wednesday. In total, 15 individuals have been chosen to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, awarded to those who "have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2008 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
Henry Louis "Skip" Gates Jr., director of Harvard's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research (among much else), has made a sequel to his 2006 PBS series "African American Lives" -- "African American Lives 2," this one is called -- in which he traces the ancestry of famous black people as far back as the written record allows, and then a little farther, thanks to the scientific magic of DNA analysis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2007 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
A night with Maya Angelou includes a little singing, a little poetry, a little storytelling. And why shouldn't it? She is an actor, a poet, an author and, despite protestations to the contrary Friday night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, a mesmerizing singer.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
Sometimes we think we have found the place, the niche, and my insight is that we should keep on our traveling shoes, that we are in process, every one of us, and we should keep on the traveling shoes and be ready. . . . --Maya Angelou Maya Angelou had completed another incredible journey, and now she was prepared to talk about it--her four-year happy-ending search for her only grandchild, who had been kidnaped by his mother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2007 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
A night with Maya Angelou includes a little singing, a little poetry, a little storytelling. And why shouldn't it? She is an actor, a poet, an author and, despite protestations to the contrary Friday night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, a mesmerizing singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2005 | From Associated Press
"Amazing Peace," a poem Maya Angelou wrote and read for last week's Christmas tree lighting at the White House, was published Tuesday in a stand-alone edition by Random House. The publisher said that the 32-page book has a suggested retail price of $9.95 and a first printing of 230,000. Angelou is the author of the classic memoir "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" and a poet whose "On the Pulse of the Morning," written for President Clinton's first inauguration, was a million-seller.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|