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SCIENCE
May 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds and perhaps even thousands of years before Charles Goodyear discovered the vulcanization process that made commercial rubber viable, Mesoamerican peoples were carrying out a similar process to produce rubber artifacts for a broad variety of uses, two MIT researchers have found. By varying the amount of materials they added to raw rubber, Mesoamericans were able to produce bouncy rubber balls for the Mayas' ceremonial games, resilient rubber sandals and sticky material used to glue implements to handles, the research shows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2014 | By John Horn
- Maya Forbes knew the story all too well, but she waited a long time to write a script based on her childhood. It's understandable why the writer-director wasn't rushing. Her father was manic-depressive, and when her mother left their Cambridge, Mass., home to attend graduate school in New York, a 10-year-old Forbes and her sister were largely left in their father's care, which was far from normal - let alone safe - parenting. Forbes, 45, who has writing credits on "The Larry Sanders Show" and the animated movie "Monsters vs. Aliens," said as a parent she has encouraged her children not to be timid.
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NEWS
September 8, 2000 | Newsday
A royal palace and the remains of an ancient Maya city--one of the richest yet known--were recently found deep in a neglected part of a Guatemalan rain forest, scientists announced Thursday. The site, called Cancuen, has been known for a century but was generally dismissed as a place of little interest. Now Vanderbilt University archeologist Arthur Demarest says an enormous three-story palace showing signs of extraordinary riches is hidden within a tree-covered mound of rock, debris and dirt.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
NBC can't shake its Maya Rudolph infatuation. The peacock network has ordered a pilot for a new prime-time variety series that will feature the "Saturday Night Live" graduate as its topliner, the network confirmed. It's a project Rudolph had been pushing for months after the cancellation of vexed comedy "Up All Night," in which she was a key cast member. PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV The variety show pairs Rudolph with an old boss once more. She will serve as executive producer along with "SNL" mastermind and "Up All Night" producer Lorne Michaels -- as well as Erin David ("Up All Night")
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His kingdom wasn't much to behold--a declining city-state in its last gasps of power. For a king, he wasn't much to behold either. Only 5 feet 2, he had once suffered a broken neck and mysteriously lost all his teeth before he died, perhaps at the unusually young age of 35. His people apparently had neither the resources nor the desire to commemorate him with a temple or even a marker.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1985 | WILLIAM WILSON
The lost civilizations of pre-Columbian America trigger everybody's fantasy machine. People who never peeped into a museum or cracked a book have muzzy images of Indiana Jones pilfering a gold temple idol or certain beer commercials on TV showing nubile virgins about to be sacrificed to ferocious, feathered snake gods. A bit of real history soon teaches of Spanish conquistadors come to decimate Aztec and Inca, plundering gold and slaughtering thousands.
SCIENCE
May 8, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Archeologists excavating in the Guatemalan rain forest have unearthed what appear to be the 1,300-year-old remains of a Maya warrior queen, a rare find in a society that was dominated by men. The previously untouched tomb was discovered in a royal palace at the Maya city of Waka, known today as El Peru. Once a city with tens of thousands of inhabitants, Waka is about 36 miles west of the Maya city of Tikal in what today is northern Guatemala.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1987 | --Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Satellite images of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, central Guatemala and Belize have shed new light on ancient Mayan civilization, such as the Mayas' settlement patterns and their use of natural resources, NASA scientists at the Ames Research Center said last week. The researchers in Mountain View, Calif., also found evidence of an ancient river plain, sea level changes and tectonic fault lines, which may have been important geographic elements in shaping Mayan civilization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Contrary to previous beliefs, Mayan society had a large and prosperous middle class built upon the spoils of internecine warfare, two Florida archeologists reported Monday. Although scientists once believed that the Mayan civilization collapsed as a result of the stratification between the royal elite and the very poor, new tombs discovered in Belize strongly support the emerging consensus that it fell instead as the result of increasingly fierce warfare.
SCIENCE
December 14, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Inside a ruined pyramid in the Guatemalan jungle, archeologists have unearthed the oldest known Maya painting, a brightly colored 30-foot-long mural depicting the Maya creation myth and the coronation of the Maya's first earthly king. The paint-on-plaster image, 3 feet tall and nearly 2,100 years old, is several centuries older than other depictions of the creation myth.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
The National Book Foundation has announced that Maya Angelou is this year's recipient of the Literarian Award, an honorary National Book Award for contributions to the literary community. Over Angelou's 50-plus years as a writer and poet, she has won many awards -- including three Grammys, the National Medal of Arts, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and over 30 honorary degrees -- but the Literarian Award could be considered her first major literary prize. In a phone interview with the Associated Press after the announcement Thursday, Angelou said the prize made her feel like she was "picking in high cotton.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2013 | By August Brown
Here's one sure sign that contemporary electronic dance music is getting better: It's slowing down. The amped-up tempos and overeager productions of the late-EDM era were the last refuge of insecure, overcompensating producers. That's why "Comfort," the languid and melancholy full-length debut from the young London producer Maya Jane Coles, feels so assured. Its dozen tracks are a model of restraint, poise and pacing that does the real job of dance music - creating a world to get lost in. The album's standout house tracks, like "Burning Bright" and "Everything," should place her next to Disclosure and Seth Troxler as outsiders with crossover potential (she's already remixed the xx, a perfect stylistic fit)
SCIENCE
June 21, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Deep in the jungles of Mexico, scientists have discovered a Maya city, complete with signs of pyramids, remnants of palace buildings and ball courts. This hidden archeological gem, named Chactún (which means “red stone” or “great stone”) was described by the country's National Institute of Anthropology and History. “It's a total gap in the archeological map of the Maya area,” Slovenian archaeologist Ivan Sprajc, who led the team, said in a taped interview in Spanish.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
On Friday night at the Los Angeles Film Festival, the actress Maya Rudolph appeared at an event billed as "The Serious Business of Being Funny," in which she would discuss her comedic influences in an interview with Elvis Mitchell.  A one-time "Saturday Night Live" cast member and recent star of the sitcom "Up All Night," Rudolph has been a warm and welcome presence in films such as "Bridesmaids" and "Away We Go. " The actress, eight months...
WORLD
May 11, 2013 | Richard Fausset
Efrain Rios Montt, the former Guatemalan military dictator who ruled his country during one of the bloodiest phases of its civil war, was found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity Friday for the systematic massacre of more than 1,700 Maya people. He was sentenced to 80 years in prison. The landmark ruling by a panel of three Guatemalan judges came after a dramatic trial that featured testimony from dozens of ethnic Ixil Maya, who described atrocities committed by the army and security forces who sought to clean the countryside of Marxist guerrillas and their sympathizers during the 1982-83 period that Rios Montt, an army general and coup leader, served as the country's de facto leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Whatever happened to magic realism? The question arises when dipping into "Maya's Notebook," Isabel Allende's bruising, cinematically vivid new novel. It's an exercise in gritty realism rather than the fanciful folkloricism that Allende has been known for, accurately or not, since her fictional debut, "The House of the Spirits," 30 years ago. Magic realism always was more of a publishers' marketing coinage than an apt description of the works of the so-called Latin American Boom, which looms over Spanish-language literature like Easter Island monoliths: Mario Vargas Llosa, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes and Gabriel García Márquez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
The mystery of the Maya demise has haunted anthropologists for centuries, but researchers may be on the verge of solving the sudden disappearance of one of history's most advanced civilizations. The Maya were "the most sophisticated, literate, complex people in the New World," according to anthropologist Arthur Demarest of Vanderbilt University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II and JANET SCHWARTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a muggy morning in March, researchers at this archeological park in southeastern Mexico were startled when a vertical layer of dirt, freed by the slash of a knife, fell away from damp stone. As it fell, it revealed the intricate inscriptions and sculptures of a massive throne that is expected to yield a trove of information about a period of Maya history that has remained surprisingly mysterious.
SCIENCE
April 25, 2013 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The classic Maya civilization, which flourished in Central America for more than 600 years, has been celebrated for its vast city states adorned with monumental pyramids and for its technological feats such as the development of an elaborate written language and impressively accurate astronomical observations. But for decades, archaeologists have argued over the birth of the culture that spawned those splendid cities about 1000 BC. Did Maya society spring from the Olmec civilization of Mexico's Gulf Coast, known for its colossal carved stone heads?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This Coachella edition gathers new music by lesser-known artists gigging this weekend's music festival as well as one epic reissue by a recently reunited group. If you haven't the desire, money or constitution to spend three days surrounded by so many humans under the desert sun, you can find comfort in the tracks (and watch the whole event live online). Kurt Vile, "Wakin on a Pretty Daze" (Matador). The Philadelphia singer and guitarist's new record is a guitar rock gem of the classic variety.
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