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Mccone Commission

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
Although the first public hearing of the Christopher Commission produced little new information, the session took on an importance that went far beyond its sparse contents. That was largely because of the prestige of the chairman of the Independent Commission on the Los Angeles Police Department, Warren Christopher, a prominent attorney.
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OPINION
March 20, 2011
The leaders of modern Los Angeles tend to come in types: There are those whose influence derives from their money, others from their position or their fame. Eli Broad and David Geffen, for example, have shaped the cultural landscape through the strategic use of their philanthropy. Tom Bradley and Richard Riordan re-imagined the city's inclusiveness and safety from the mayor's office. Cardinal Roger Mahony influenced events and leaders from the pulpit. Then there was Warren M. Christopher.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-five years ago, Marlen E. Neumann set out to heal a riot-torn city. Alongside seven other members of a state commission appointed to investigate the causes of the 1965 Watts riots, Neumann spent more than three months walking the scorched earth of the district--interviewing residents, scrutinizing conditions, gauging the anger that for six days had rocked Los Angeles. "That community needed answers," said Neumann, the sole woman appointed to the riot commission.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marlen Eldredge Neumann, the only woman to serve on the eight-member McCone Commission that investigated the Watts riots of 1965, has died in Washington, D.C., at age 81. Neumann also served as president of the Los Angeles League of Women Voters and was a member of the city's Civil Service Commission. She died Tuesday of heart failure, family members said. She was married to Robert G. Neumann, a UCLA political science professor who became U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1991 | DAVID GRAY, Actor, Gray, who does commercials and voice-overs, is a Los Angeles resident who has been actively involved in local Neighborhood Watch programs.
The McCone Commission (on the Watts riots) in 1965 recommended the implementation of community-based policing and an inspector general. The fact that 26 years later the same recommendations are being made is bugging me. The president of the Police Commission in 1965 was John Ferraro (now City Council president). This means the man who was instrumental back then in seeing those recommendations implemented is 26 years later the same man advocating we should stick with the status quo. Warren Christopher also was on the McCone Commission.
OPINION
March 20, 2011
The leaders of modern Los Angeles tend to come in types: There are those whose influence derives from their money, others from their position or their fame. Eli Broad and David Geffen, for example, have shaped the cultural landscape through the strategic use of their philanthropy. Tom Bradley and Richard Riordan re-imagined the city's inclusiveness and safety from the mayor's office. Cardinal Roger Mahony influenced events and leaders from the pulpit. Then there was Warren M. Christopher.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a Commission, we are seriously concerned that the existing breach (between the general Los Angeles community and the 'disadvantaged area ') if allowed to persist could in time split our society irretrievably. So serious and so explosive is the situation that unless it is checked, the August riots may seem by comparison to be only a curtain-raiser for what could blow up one day in the future. The McCone Commission on the Watts Riot, Dec. 6, 1965 Since Watts erupted 27 years ago, the McCone Commission study of riot-torn South-Central Los Angeles has stood as the standard reference of what went wrong and how to fix the ills that beset this depressed corner of urban America.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marlen Eldredge Neumann, the only woman to serve on the eight-member McCone Commission that investigated the Watts riots of 1965, has died in Washington, D.C., at age 81. Neumann also served as president of the Los Angeles League of Women Voters and was a member of the city's Civil Service Commission. She died Tuesday of heart failure, family members said. She was married to Robert G. Neumann, a UCLA political science professor who became U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2005 | By Valerie Reitman and Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writers
The divisions are still there, 40 years later. To many, the events that began in Watts on Aug. 11, 1965, remain a riot, pure and simple - a social breakdown into mob rule and criminality. To others, they were a revolt, a rebellion, an uprising - a violent but justified leap into a future of black self-empowerment. To mark the 40th anniversary of the riots, The Times asked nine people, all of whom witnessed the events firsthand, to recount their memories of six days that changed their lives and the course of the city.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a Commission, we are seriously concerned that the existing breach (between the general Los Angeles community and the 'disadvantaged area ') if allowed to persist could in time split our society irretrievably. So serious and so explosive is the situation that unless it is checked, the August riots may seem by comparison to be only a curtain-raiser for what could blow up one day in the future. The McCone Commission on the Watts Riot, Dec. 6, 1965 Since Watts erupted 27 years ago, the McCone Commission study of riot-torn South-Central Los Angeles has stood as the standard reference of what went wrong and how to fix the ills that beset this depressed corner of urban America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1991 | DAVID GRAY, Actor, Gray, who does commercials and voice-overs, is a Los Angeles resident who has been actively involved in local Neighborhood Watch programs.
The McCone Commission (on the Watts riots) in 1965 recommended the implementation of community-based policing and an inspector general. The fact that 26 years later the same recommendations are being made is bugging me. The president of the Police Commission in 1965 was John Ferraro (now City Council president). This means the man who was instrumental back then in seeing those recommendations implemented is 26 years later the same man advocating we should stick with the status quo. Warren Christopher also was on the McCone Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
Although the first public hearing of the Christopher Commission produced little new information, the session took on an importance that went far beyond its sparse contents. That was largely because of the prestige of the chairman of the Independent Commission on the Los Angeles Police Department, Warren Christopher, a prominent attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-five years ago, Marlen E. Neumann set out to heal a riot-torn city. Alongside seven other members of a state commission appointed to investigate the causes of the 1965 Watts riots, Neumann spent more than three months walking the scorched earth of the district--interviewing residents, scrutinizing conditions, gauging the anger that for six days had rocked Los Angeles. "That community needed answers," said Neumann, the sole woman appointed to the riot commission.
OPINION
March 26, 1995
After the 1965 Watts riots, the McCone Commission recommended the creation of an office of inspector general made up of civilians and Los Angeles police officers who would operate outside the regular LAPD chain of command. It would have handled all civilian complaints against officers, bringing credibility to the process, and it would have reported directly to the police chief. It was a good idea. It was never implemented.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas R. Sheridan, a prominent Los Angeles trial lawyer who served as executive director of the McCone Commission and special assistant to the U.S. attorney general, died Thursday. He was 60. Sheridan died of cardiac arrest at St. Vincent's Medical Center where he had been hospitalized for several weeks. He had also suffered a series of strokes. U.S. Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy had appointed Sheridan his special assistant in 1962.
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