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Mccoy Family

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NEWS
June 11, 2000 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just like their infamous ancestors, the Hatfields gathered on the West Virginia side of the Tug Fork Valley, the McCoys across the state line in Kentucky. As they always have, the families talked about coal, about mountain songs, about the dead. Then, unlike their forebears--who for a dozen years in the late 1800s crept through the poison ivy and pawpaw trees to kill each other--the families worked their way peacefully, tentatively at first, to the other side to say hello.
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NEWS
June 11, 2000 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just like their infamous ancestors, the Hatfields gathered on the West Virginia side of the Tug Fork Valley, the McCoys across the state line in Kentucky. As they always have, the families talked about coal, about mountain songs, about the dead. Then, unlike their forebears--who for a dozen years in the late 1800s crept through the poison ivy and pawpaw trees to kill each other--the families worked their way peacefully, tentatively at first, to the other side to say hello.
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NEWS
December 3, 1989 | From United Press International
Two former law enforcement officers believe that the mysterious airplane hijacker D. B. Cooper may have been a Utah man who staged a similar crime five months later. Former FBI agent Russell Calame and Bernie Rhodes, a former federal probation officer, have written a book making a case that Cooper was really Richard Floyd McCoy Jr., a Mormon Sunday School teacher and law enforcement student from Provo, Utah, who was caught after hijacking a plane in April, 1972.
OPINION
November 15, 1998
Just after World War II, there was one man, one mountain and one rudimentary ski lift. Over the years, Dave McCoy built Mammoth Mountain into possibly the nation's best skiing mountain. The adjacent town of Mammoth Lakes remained a somewhat rustic, quiet village with no major resort hotels or focused town center. Most of Mammoth's visitors drove up from Southern California for weekends of skiing, fishing, camping or backpacking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1997 | JEFF KASS
Try one of these on for size: A silk taffeta Griswold family wedding dress from 1830, or a wedding dress linked to the feuding Hatfields and McCoys--black because of the many deaths in the family. Those and two dozen other vintage wedding dresses will be on display at the historic Howe-Waffle House beginning Saturday as part of the sixth annual Santa Ana Historical Preservation Society Home and Garden Tour.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2004 | From Associated Press
The capture of a suspect in the deadly highway shooting spree that terrorized motorists here has prompted questions about who should get the $60,000 reward -- the man who recognized him at a Las Vegas casino or family members who reportedly turned him in. "It makes it very difficult because there's so many pieces of the puzzle," Central Ohio Crime Stoppers director Kevin Miles said Thursday. The questions about the reward money came a day after Charles A. McCoy Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1997
Each winter, tens of thousands of Southern Californians drive more than 300 miles north to ski at Mammoth Mountain, which experts rank as one of the best skiing mountains in North America. At the same time, the area's host town, Mammoth Lakes, gets mediocre ratings as a resort--hard to get to, no major hotel and convention complex, limited night life and little upscale shopping.
SPORTS
October 31, 2003 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
Matt Kegel's season was going along so well, he probably figured it couldn't last. It didn't. After throwing only four interceptions in his first seven games, the Washington State senior quarterback tossed five interceptions and fumbled twice in last week's 36-30 comeback victory over Oregon State in Pullman. It got so bad, the home crowd started cheering any play that involved a handoff. Momma told him there'd be days like these. Well, if not momma, his position coach certainly did.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Jon Caramanica
For a complex show, "Friday Night Lights" has always been unambiguous. It takes place in a city, Dillon, Texas, that has its own rules and hierarchies, and the show makes as much sense as a naturalistic look at rural life as a functioning moral universe. Over its three seasons, efforts have been made to unseat football coach Eric Taylor (Kyle Chandler) and his wife, school Principal Tami Taylor (Connie Britton), from their perches, but they've always been unsuccessful: Other shows might sympathize with the bad guy, but "Friday Night Lights" has no room for that.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2005 | Louis Sahagun and Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writers
The storied Mammoth Mountain Ski Area on Tuesday announced plans to sell a controlling interest in its sprawling holdings in the eastern Sierra to a private investment firm led by luxury hotel mogul Barry S. Sternlicht. The $365-million acquisition by Starwood Capital Group promises to bring a more upscale character to the resort, in contrast to the unpolished and independent style of the resort's pioneering founder and co-owner, Dave McCoy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her Hollywood career was brief--it began when she was 3 and ended before she was 5--but Jacquelyn Woll worked with screen greats Laurel and Hardy, Marie Dressler and Little Rascal Spanky MacFarland. Billed as Jacquie Lynn, she made her film debut in the Laurel and Hardy feature "Pack Up Your Troubles," appearing in a memorable scene in which she reads "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" to a sleepy Laurel.
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