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BUSINESS
July 6, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASA's top administrator visited McDonnell Douglas Aerospace here Tuesday for a progress report on the space station and other projects. Daniel S. Goldin, who said he was pleased by last week's resounding vote of confidence by the U.S. House of Representatives for the space station, gave a qualified thumbs up to McDonnell Douglas' efforts as a primary contractor on the project. "Douglas is coming along," he said.
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BUSINESS
August 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Boeing Co. on Monday announced management changes designed to integrate McDonnell Douglas Corp. into the aerospace company, giving one of its own executives oversight of all of McDonnell Douglas' vast military operations. Boeing Chairman Phil Condit and President Harry Stonecipher announced the post-merger reorganization at a Washington news conference beamed by satellite to rallies attended by most of the manufacturer's 220,000 employees.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 1994 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
McDonnell Contract: McDonnell Douglas Aerospace in Huntington Beach said it has won a $6.6-million contract to improve its weapons sighting system known as the Mast Mounted Sight System Processor. The company will develop the sensor technology, which is based on computer chips made from gallium arsenide material, so it can be mass produced. An older version of the technology is used in the U.S. Army's OH-58D observation helicopter.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonnell Douglas Executive Fired: Herbert Lanese, director of St. Louis-based McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s military business, was fired after eight months on the job in a clash with Chief Executive Harry Stonecipher, who said he could not reconcile his differences with Lanese. "Although Herb and I were in total agreement regarding business objectives and strategy, we had sharp differences involving management and leadership styles," Stonecipher said.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonnell Wins Major Rocket Contract: The Air Force has awarded McDonnell Douglas a rocket-production contract that could be worth as much as $1 billion, the company said. The deal calls for the construction of as many as 36 Delta II rockets and amounts to a major victory for the firm, which has been beset by layoffs and contract problems.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonnell Douglas Executive Fired: Herbert Lanese, director of St. Louis-based McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s military business, was fired after eight months on the job in a clash with Chief Executive Harry Stonecipher, who said he could not reconcile his differences with Lanese. "Although Herb and I were in total agreement regarding business objectives and strategy, we had sharp differences involving management and leadership styles," Stonecipher said.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force has awarded McDonnell Douglas Aerospace a rocket production contract that could be worth as much as $1 billion, the company said Friday. The deal for construction of as many as 36 of McDonnell Douglas' Delta II rockets is a major victory for the company, which has been beset in the past year by cost-cutting layoffs and the cancellation of a $500-million test program for the "Star Wars" system.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has chosen three Southland aerospace companies as finalists in the development of a less-expensive replacement for the space shuttle. The X-33 program, as NASA calls the project, is potentially worth $650 million if a single space-launch vehicle is built, NASA officials said. The program is designed to turn over detailed development of future launch systems to private industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1989
A three-month undercover investigation ended with the arrests of a supervisor and four other workers at the McDonnell Douglas aerospace plant in Huntington Beach on suspicion of selling cocaine and marijuana, police said Friday. Huntington Beach narcotics officers worked with members of the McDonnell Douglas security staff on the investigation. The arrests were made July 20 but were not disclosed until Friday, police said.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
McDonnell Douglas said Friday that it is laying off another 650 workers in St. Louis and Southern California as part of its restructuring efforts. John F. McDonnell, chairman and chief executive of the nation's largest defense contractor, said 400 workers in St. Louis and 250 in California received notices Friday. Two hundred of the California jobs were cut in Huntington Beach and 50 in Santa Ana, officials said. All but 50 of the layoffs in St.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1995 | LISA RICHWINE, STATES NEWS SERVICE
McDonnell Douglas Corp., securing a contract worth up to $1.5 billion over the next 10 years, said it will develop the next generation of its Delta launch rocket that would be capable of lifting satellites twice as heavy as its current launcher can carry. McDonnell's Huntington Beach space group, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, will design and develop the Delta III rocket, stabilizing the work force at the facility.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has chosen three Southland aerospace companies as finalists in the development of a less-expensive replacement for the space shuttle. The X-33 program, as NASA calls the project, is potentially worth $650 million if a single space-launch vehicle is built, NASA officials said. The program is designed to turn over detailed development of future launch systems to private industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it "Space Shuttle: The Next Generation." The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has chosen Lockheed and two other Southland aerospace companies as finalists in the development of a less-expensive replacement for the space shuttle. The X-33 program, as NASA calls the project, is potentially worth $650 million if a single space-launch vehicle is built, NASA officials said Friday. The program is designed to turn over detailed development of future launch systems to private industry.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASA's top administrator visited McDonnell Douglas Aerospace here Tuesday for a progress report on the space station and other projects. Daniel S. Goldin, who said he was pleased by last week's resounding vote of confidence by the U.S. House of Representatives for the space station, gave a qualified thumbs up to McDonnell Douglas' efforts as a primary contractor on the project. "Douglas is coming along," he said.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1994 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
McDonnell Contract: McDonnell Douglas Aerospace in Huntington Beach said it has won a $6.6-million contract to improve its weapons sighting system known as the Mast Mounted Sight System Processor. The company will develop the sensor technology, which is based on computer chips made from gallium arsenide material, so it can be mass produced. An older version of the technology is used in the U.S. Army's OH-58D observation helicopter.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charlotte, a spider-like robot named after the clever arachnid in the book "Charlotte's Web," will soon be scurrying about in the heavens helping space shuttle astronauts do their chores. The robot, about the size of a microwave oven, will do work that is better fitted for an eight-limbed mechanical spider than two-armed astronauts--things like carrying heavy payloads in shuttle experiments and shooting pictures in space.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charlotte, a spider-like robot named after the clever arachnid in the book "Charlotte's Web," will soon be scurrying about in the heavens helping space shuttle astronauts do their chores. The robot, about the size of a microwave oven, will do work that is better fitted for an eight-limbed mechanical spider than two-armed astronauts--things like carrying heavy payloads in shuttle experiments and shooting pictures in space.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1995 | LISA RICHWINE, STATES NEWS SERVICE
McDonnell Douglas Corp., securing a contract worth up to $1.5 billion over the next 10 years, said it will develop the next generation of its Delta launch rocket that would be capable of lifting satellites twice as heavy as its current launcher can carry. McDonnell's Huntington Beach space group, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, will design and develop the Delta III rocket, stabilizing the work force at the facility.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas Corp. must correct the problems in its troubled C-17 cargo plane within two years, the Pentagon said Wednesday, or the government will seek another contractor for the project--a step that could cost Southern California up to 20,000 defense-related jobs. McDonnell Douglas, which has until the end of the week to agree to the new terms, was unusually noncommittal about whether it has the ability to continue the multibillion-dollar C-17 program.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonnell Wins Major Rocket Contract: The Air Force has awarded McDonnell Douglas a rocket-production contract that could be worth as much as $1 billion, the company said. The deal calls for the construction of as many as 36 Delta II rockets and amounts to a major victory for the firm, which has been beset by layoffs and contract problems.
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