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Mcdonnell Douglas Corp

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997
McDonnell Douglas Corp. donated a 32-foot-long tractor-trailer to Long Beach Municipal Airport officials Monday for conversion into the airstrip's first mobile communications center. A city spokesman said the 5-year-old truck will be outfitted with radio equipment and stationed at the airport next year to be used in emergencies requiring a self-contained command center.
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NEWS
July 27, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Boeing Co. just days away from acquiring McDonnell Douglas Corp., McDonnell executives are trying to resolve an unusually large number of allegations of harassment and discrimination in the workplace. In a lengthy three-year investigation, federal labor officials found numerous incidents of bias at McDonnell's Long Beach plant and, for the last month, have been trying to negotiate a settlement. "This has become a very complex investigation," said Tino Serrano, a spokesman for the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1997 | From Associated Press
The merger of longtime rivals Boeing Co. and McDonnell Douglas Corp. on Friday won overwhelming shareholder approval, clearing the way for a combination that Boeing's chairman said "will redefine the future of flight." The $15-billion merger blends McDonnell Douglas' success in fighter aircraft, rocket boosters and other defense work with Boeing's dominance of the commercial jet market.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Euro-U.S. Trade War!" was the story the Brussels press corps was itching to write this week. But as economists and business experts predicted, it didn't happen. Europe and America, they maintained, just couldn't afford it. "We are like an old, married couple," Paul Horne, chief international economist at Smith Barney, an investment bank, said in Paris. "We may squabble, but we need each other too much." In the end, after months of white-knuckle suspense and escalating rhetoric, Boeing Co.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1997 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the good news that the European Union gave an 11th-hour approval to their $16-billion merger was sinking in Wednesday, the leaders of Boeing Co. and McDonnell Douglas Corp. offered a bullish assessment of McDonnell's aircraft operations in Long Beach. In an upbeat joint news conference, McDonnell Douglas Chairman Harry Stonecipher said the outlook for the 19,100 employees at its sprawling facility in Long Beach is "very positive."
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Averting a potentially brutal trade war, the European Union granted preliminary approval Wednesday to Boeing Co.'s landmark merger with McDonnell Douglas Corp. after Boeing made a series of modest concessions to overcome fierce European opposition. Although a European official characterized Boeing's concessions as "spectacular," the company said the agreement might not have any influence on Boeing's sales over the next decade and does nothing to financially undermine the merger.
NEWS
July 23, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an eleventh-hour bid to quell protests by the European Union against its mega-merger with McDonnell Douglas Corp., Boeing Co. offered Tuesday to back off slightly on the key sticking point in what has turned into a high-stakes diplomatic drama. The secret negotiations, which included President Clinton and several European leaders, came as the two sides hurtled toward a showdown today and raised hopes that a bruising trade conflict could be avoided.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Southern California's many aerospace subcontractors and the vast number of skilled workers in this region have cause to cheer that a compromise solution will probably be worked out with the European Union over Boeing Co.'s merger with McDonnell Douglas Corp. A decision from the EU, which has objected to the merger in order to protect the interests of Airbus Industrie, is scheduled to be announced today in Brussels.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1997 | (Washington Post)
The Clinton administration is considering how to retaliate against Europe if it carries out its threat to try to undermine the merger of U.S. aerospace giants Boeing Co. and McDonnell Douglas Corp. At a White House meeting this week, officials agreed to put the full weight of the government behind Boeing now that it has the Federal Trade Commission's approval for the $15-billion merger.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
U.S. antitrust officials said America's national interests would be at stake if the European Union imposes onerous sanctions against Boeing Co.'s $15.5-billion acquisition of McDonnell Douglas Corp. A special delegation of U.S. officials, led by Justice Department antitrust chief Joel Klein, met in Brussels on Sunday with European antitrust regulators who are still considering whether to reject the acquisition. The EU cannot halt the merger.
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