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BUSINESS
July 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonnell Douglas Gets Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Nod: The company has been selected by the Department of Defense to demonstrate technology for a small, unmanned aerial vehicle. McDonnell Douglas Missile Systems Co. of St. Louis, working with Sky Technology Inc. of Hurst, Tex., will construct a small propeller-driven unmanned aerial vehicle that can take off vertically, transition to conventional wing-borne flight and transition back to hover for landing.
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BUSINESS
November 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
McDonnell Douglas Corp. has decided to revamp its finance subsidiary rather than sell it, company officials said. McDonnell spokesman Andrew B. Wilson said the Long Beach-based subsidiary, which drew no buyers after being on the block for several months, will be refocused to concentrate on aircraft financing and commercial-equipment leasing. "We are still thinking of downsizing and selling off other assets," Wilson said.
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BUSINESS
November 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
McDonnell Douglas Corp. has decided to revamp its finance subsidiary rather than sell it, company officials said. McDonnell spokesman Andrew B. Wilson said the Long Beach-based subsidiary, which drew no buyers after being on the block for several months, will be refocused to concentrate on aircraft financing and commercial-equipment leasing. "We are still thinking of downsizing and selling off other assets," Wilson said.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonnell Douglas Gets Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Nod: The company has been selected by the Department of Defense to demonstrate technology for a small, unmanned aerial vehicle. McDonnell Douglas Missile Systems Co. of St. Louis, working with Sky Technology Inc. of Hurst, Tex., will construct a small propeller-driven unmanned aerial vehicle that can take off vertically, transition to conventional wing-borne flight and transition back to hover for landing.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
McDonnell Douglas said Monday that it will split up its astronautics company, which includes its 8,200-employee facility in Huntington Beach, into three separate units effective Dec. 1. Company officials said the move is intended to streamline the operations of the St. Louis-based astronautics division and better focus activities of its three primary businesses--space systems, missile systems and defense electronics.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonnell Douglas Corp. named John P. Capellupo--a veteran executive who created a stir last year with his get-tough policies at Douglas Aircraft in Long Beach--as president of its McDonnell Aircraft unit in St. Louis. The embattled aerospace firm said "a decision" about Capellupo's current position--deputy president of the Long Beach unit--will be announced by May 1. Capellupo, 56, was responsible for the troubled Air Force C-17 cargo jet program during his tenure in Long Beach.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Douglas Aircraft President James E. Worsham, the hard-driving airplane salesman who is widely credited with the historic turnaround of McDonnell Douglas' commercial aircraft business in the 1980s, will step down May 1. McDonnell Douglas named Robert H. Hood Jr. to succeed Worsham, who will turn 65 in April and leave under the company's mandatory retirement policy.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1991 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's proposal to yank nuclear-tipped Tomahawk cruise missiles off U.S. surface ships and submarines met with fear and apprehension Monday at General Dynamics' Convair division here, where about 2,000 workers are directly involved in building Tomahawks. "We don't know how far this (arms reduction proposal) is going to go," said Ed Maudlin, an official with the International Assn. of Machinists, which represents about 5,900 General Dynamics employees in San Diego.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
Not long ago, Ann Piening McMahon had a career analyzing laser communications satellites and making computer models for McDonnell Douglas Corp. Now, she's showing rocks to preschoolers for a living. "As far as I know, I'm the only scientist who does birthday parties," she said. McMahon is one of the success stories among 11,000 workers laid off since September, 1990, by the nation's largest defense contractor.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
McDonnell Douglas said Monday that it will split up its astronautics company, which includes its 8,200-employee facility in Huntington Beach, into three separate units effective Dec. 1. Company officials said the move is intended to streamline the operations of the St. Louis-based astronautics division and better focus activities of its three primary businesses--space systems, missile systems and defense electronics.
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