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March 28, 1992 | ROSE APODACA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Working as a part of Southern California's surf culture means doing business unconventionally. The pin-striped suit is eschewed, and you don't often "do lunch" to cut a deal. And when Thom McElroy schedules a board meeting, he looks to the ocean for a sign. The Costa Mesa graphic artist certainly does not look for some New Age-inspired omen from nature to conduct business. But if the waves are good, McElroy and his clients bring along a primary tool of their trade: surfboards.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 1992 | ROSE APODACA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Working as a part of Southern California's surf culture means doing business unconventionally. The pin-striped suit is eschewed, and you don't often "do lunch" to cut a deal. And when Thom McElroy schedules a board meeting, he looks to the ocean for a sign. The Costa Mesa graphic artist certainly does not look for some New Age-inspired omen from nature to conduct business. But if the waves are good, McElroy and his clients bring along a primary tool of their trade: surfboards.
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June 8, 1995 | ROSE APODACA JONES
No one ever regarded the surf industry as a source of glamour, but that notion may be reconsidered because of the attire strutted at the sixth annual Waterman's Ball at Pelican Hill Golf Club in Newport Beach on Saturday. More than 1,000 of the industry's designers, artists and leaders piled in under the white big top for the gala, which raised $175,000 for the American Oceans Campaign, the Orange County Marine Institute and the Surfrider Foundation.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | BRAD BONHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't look for this magazine in a pediatrician's waiting room. True, the cover does picture a little girl on a tricycle. But she is out of focus and seems pensive as she peers out of a hazy, black-brown gloom that suggests apocalypse--or at least anarchy. Above her is perched the magazine's title . . . or maybe it's a warning: Cringe. Inside is a print version of shock radio, a graphic mimicry of the quick-cutting, party-down-dude delirium of MTV.
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