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January 6, 2008
Ron Drake of Santa Barbara and several family members were gifted with clear weather on their last day of an otherwise rainy Alaska trip. As they enjoyed a plane trip to a glacier near Mt. McKinley, Drake zoomed in and snapped a photo of the burst of clouds coming off McKinley caused by high winds. He used a Nikon Coolpix S10.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Lornet Turnbull
Chad Kellogg, an elite alpinist who climbed some of the world's highest and most challenging peaks - charging up mountains and breaking records for the fastest ascents - was killed Feb. 14 while descending Mt. Fitz Roy, a prominent peak in the Patagonia region of Argentina. He was 42. Kellogg, a Seattle resident, and his climbing partner Jens Holsten, of Leavenworth, Wash., had successfully summited the 11,000-foot mountain and were hanging together from a preestablished anchor when a rock fell, striking Kellogg and killing him instantly.
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NEWS
April 27, 1986 | PAUL JENKINS, Associated Press
The world goes white as the rotors of the Army helicopter grab for air. Somewhere below, uncomfortably close, looms a huge mountain, the largest in North America. "Fifty, 40, 30, 20, 10, 5," an airman counts on the intercom as the twin-engine CH-47C settles toward Mt. McKinley. Squinting out the open rear door of the Chinook, he is the only man aboard who can see the ground. "Contact!"
NATIONAL
July 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Tom Choate does not see what the fuss is about. The 78-year-old Anchorage resident - with an artificial hip he got last year - became the oldest person to summit Mt. McKinley in Alaska's Denali National Park. And all he did was take the climb a little bit slower than everybody else. “I didn't think it was anything but an old goat climbing up a mountain," Choate told the Los Angeles Times in a phone interview Thursday. North America's tallest mountain at 20,320 feet, McKinley has gone from a wildland summit to a tourist destination in Choate's lifetime.
NEWS
May 3, 1993 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The helicopter intercom pops with nervous voices: "93% . . . 96% . . . 103% . . . I can't see a thing. . . . Me either. . . . Don't like this one bit! . . . Nope! . . . Kerthunk. Kerthunk." Translation: The twin-rotor Army Chinook CH-47, flying over the Kahiltna Glacier on North America's mightiest mountain, is attempting to land search-and-rescue supplies. But as it makes its approach, its twin turbine engines are torqued beyond their safe capacity at this high altitude.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Lornet Turnbull
Chad Kellogg, an elite alpinist who climbed some of the world's highest and most challenging peaks - charging up mountains and breaking records for the fastest ascents - was killed Feb. 14 while descending Mt. Fitz Roy, a prominent peak in the Patagonia region of Argentina. He was 42. Kellogg, a Seattle resident, and his climbing partner Jens Holsten, of Leavenworth, Wash., had successfully summited the 11,000-foot mountain and were hanging together from a preestablished anchor when a rock fell, striking Kellogg and killing him instantly.
NEWS
March 28, 1985
The Santa Monica-Malibu Board of Education has changed school boundaries to absorb students who will be affected by the closure of Madison Elementary School in September. Under the changes approved by the board Monday night, students living west of 12th Street and north of Colorado Avenue will go to Roosevelt Elementary. Students living east of 12th Street will attend McKinley and those living west of 12th and south of Colorado will attend John Muir.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1987 | RAY MEANS, United Press International
Mountain climber Arlene Blum, conqueror of mighty Mt. McKinley and Annapurna I, is taking her 4-month-old daughter on her next great adventure--a 900-mile trek across Europe's snow-capped Alps. Lead the life you want and don't forget to include your children, she insists to parents. "I believe that parents continuing to pursue the activities they love is of benefit to their children. I can continue having adventures and incorporate her into my activities," Blum, 42, said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2007 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
Rapper-actor Snoop Dogg will avoid jail time after pleading no contest Wednesday to two felony charges -- but he might be legally allowed to continue smoking marijuana. The entertainer, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, entered the plea to a charge of gun possession by a convicted felon and a marijuana-related drug charge, prosecutors said. Dogg, 35, appeared before Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Terry Smerling in Pasadena clad in a leather jacket, black jeans and a T-shirt.
NEWS
May 14, 1990 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Truckers rolling through on Interstate 40 refer to this city of 20,000 on their CBs as "Drunk City, U.S.A." The label reflects Gallup's long-established reputation as a place where people--most of them from the nearby Navajo reservation--come to get drunk. Along Route 66 and its assortment of bars and package outlets, drunks slump against buildings a block from the Santa Fe train yard, where passenger trains bound for Los Angeles and Chicago stop each day.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2012 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
A broken rope is the only clue to the location of four Japanese climbers who vanished in an avalanche on Alaska's Mt. McKinley last week. And that rope - discovered in a pile of compacted ice and snow by a National Park Service mountaineer, almost 100 feet below the surface of a glacial crevasse on America's tallest mountain - may be all that remains of the climbers for a while. After the rope's discovery, it became too dangerous to keep digging, so the search for the lost climbers - Yoshiaki Kato, 64, Masako Suda, 50, Michiko Suzuki, 56, and Tamao Suzuki, 63, of the Miyagi Workers Alpine Federation - has been called off "permanently," officials said Sunday afternoon.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
Four Japanese climbers are believed to be dead days after an avalanche roared down Alaska's Mt. McKinley and swept the group off a steep slope, the U.S. National Park Service said Saturday. As the crew of five inched down the tallest peak in North America early Thursday morning, a wave of snow 80 stories tall crashed over them, snapping the rope that kept the group connected and burying four of the climbers, said John Leonard, Denali National Park's chief mountaineering ranger.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The President and the Assassin: McKinley, Terror, and Empire at the Dawn of the American Century Scott Miller Random House: 432 pp., $28 Veteran journalist Scott Miller has done something very interesting in his first book: He has conjoined two kinds of histories to create a portrait of the United States at the turn of the 20th century as a country divided between worldviews so radically dissimilar that they hardly seemed to be describing...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2011 | By Swati Pandey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Indigo is something of a mystery. It sits between the more familiar purple and blue of rainbows. And it's the elusive center of Catherine E. McKinley's "Indigo: In Search of the Color That Seduced the World" which like its eponymous shade, falls somewhere between more familiar poles. As history, it wanders, sometimes too hastily, through millenniums and contents to trace the reach and power of indigo dye and fabric. As memoir, it gorgeously recounts McKinley's journey to West Africa's teeming markets and churning factories, through funerals and uprisings, to find "the bluest of blues.
OPINION
April 18, 2011 | Jim Newton
The struggle for equal educational opportunity is the great civil rights imperative of our time. It pits those who demand a decent education against an educational establishment that often blithely ignores them. The victims are overwhelmingly poor minorities, and the clash is nowhere more important than here in Los Angeles. Next week, I look forward to profiling some of the heroes of this struggle, the inspiring young women and men brought together by Teach for America; first, however, a look at the defenders of a corrupt status quo and the lengths to which they will resort to defend their position at the expense of poor children, most of them black or Latino.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2011 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
In the biggest changes yet to the troubled Broadway musical "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," its producers announced Wednesday that director Julie Taymor will be stepping down from her daily responsibilities with the production. They also postponed its official opening for the sixth time, to an unspecified day "in early summer. " Taking Taymor's place is Philip William McKinley, whose only Broadway credit is the 2003 musical "The Boy From Oz," which starred Hugh Jackman. "Spider-Man," which began preview performances Nov. 28 at the Foxwoods Theatre in New York, has been plagued by production delays, cast injuries and a spiraling budget that, at $65 million, makes it the most expensive show in Broadway history.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | Associated Press
A 12-year-old boy whose father died climbing Mt. Everest has become the youngest person to conquer Mt. McKinley, North America's tallest peak. Taras Genet of Talkeetna, Alaska, reached the 20,320-foot summit on Friday with six members of his expedition, the National Park Service said Monday. Genet is a son of Ray Genet, a mountain-climbing guide who died in October, 1979, trying to climb the world's tallest peak.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kelly Jackson decided to keep it a secret. Rather than spoil the surprise, he would let his mother, who lives in Kansas City, see the Coke commercial herself. "So she called," Jackson said, "and she asked me, 'Were you on television?' and I was like, 'Well, yeah, I was.' And she said, 'Were you drinking a Coke?' And I said, 'Yeah, I was.' And she was just so happy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
After two months of controversy, the Compton school board Tuesday rejected a petition by parents aiming to use a groundbreaking state law to turn over their struggling elementary school to a charter operator. Board members with the Compton Unified School District voted unanimously, 7-0, to return the petition to parents at McKinley Elementary , saying it failed to include information required by state regulations. District officials also found that parents cited the wrong education code section and failed to provide evidence that they had selected their desired charter operator, Celerity Educational Group, after a "rigorous review process" as required by state emergency regulations.
OPINION
February 15, 2011 | Jim Newton
Marlene Romero watched with growing anxiety as her 8-year-old son suffered through third grade at McKinley Elementary School in Compton. She was unhappy with his progress and felt trapped at a failing school. Then, taking advantage of a state law that allows parents to band together and demand change, she signed a petition: "I did it for a better education for my son. " Theresa Theus' daughter had liked preschool, but soon after enrolling at McKinley, she began saying she was bored.
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