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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996
Jurors at the murder trial of rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg began deliberating his fate Friday after a prosecutor told the panel not to allow the defense to "demonize" the victim. Comparing victim Philip Woldemariam to the fictional character Bigger Thomas in the novel "Native Son," co-prosecutor Bobby Grace told the jury: "They are trying to portray Philip Woldemariam as an aggressive, wild person. Don't fall into that trap." The rapper, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, and former bodyguard McKinley Lee, 25, have been charged with murder in connection with the shooting death of Woldemariam at Woodbine Park on Aug. 25, 1993.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bodyguard for top-selling rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg was sentenced by a judge to 16 months in prison Wednesday after he pleaded no contest to stalking his former girlfriend. McKinley Malik Lee, 27, could have avoided prison had he abided by a plea agreement reached earlier under which he promised to stop contacting the victim, a 25-year-old San Fernando Valley woman. But Lee's defense attorney later withdrew the plea after prosecutors alleged he had again called and threatened the victim.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial Monday dropped charges against a co-defendant who was in the rear seat of the rapper's Jeep at the time of the alleged 1993 drive-by killing. Although prosecutors Ed Nison and Bobby Grace said they will consider refiling murder charges against Sean Abrams later, the decision Monday removes from the courtroom--at least temporarily--a lawyer with whom the district attorney's office had some trouble in a recent unrelated case: Johnnie L. Cochran Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1997 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge ordered a bodyguard for rap artist Snoop Doggy Dogg jailed in lieu of $150,000 bail in a stalking case Tuesday after hearing answering machine tapes of the defendant talking to a woman he had been ordered to avoid. McKinley Malik Lee, 27, pleaded no contest in January to a felony charge that he stalked the 25-year-old San Fernando Valley woman for the purpose of harassing her. He had been scheduled to receive a 16-month suspended sentence and probation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg and his bodyguard went looking for a rival gang member in a Palms park in August 1993 then gunned him down to "teach him a lesson," a prosecutor told jurors Monday. In the first day of closing arguments, prosecutor Ed Nison told the racially diverse jury that the crime was anything but self-defense, as claimed by the rapper's lawyers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996
The prosecution in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial concluded its closing arguments in Los Angeles Superior Court on Tuesday, telling jurors not to consider the rapper's star status when deciding his guilt or innocence. "He has to abide by the same rules and conduct that the rest of us do," co-prosecutor Ed Nison told the panel. The rapper, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, and his former bodyguard, McKinley Lee, have been charged with murder and conspiracy to commit assault in connection with Philip Woldemariam's shooting death on Aug. 25, 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1995
About 60 prospective panelists made it through the first phase of jury selection on Thursday in the murder trial of Snoop Doggy Dogg--one of America's best known rappers--and two co-defendants. "It is what we call a 'high-profile' case," Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Paul Flynn told nearly 100 potential panelists, some of whom groaned, as the morning began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996
The Los Angeles Superior Court jury in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial, apparently struggling with a manslaughter charge, sent a note to the judge seeking guidance on their deliberations, it was learned Friday. It was unclear whether the jury had discarded the more serious charges of first- and second-degree murder against the rapper and his bodyguard, McKinley Lee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defense in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial completed its opening statements Tuesday, portraying the rapper's bodyguard as a family man who was merely doing his job when he shot and killed a hotheaded gang member who was looking for a fight after seeing Snoop on his Westside turf. "That shooting is completely consistent with self-defense," defense lawyer Donald Re told the jury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial Tuesday filed an appeal of a Superior Court judge's decision to edit taped statements made to police by two defendants, contending that the action weakens their case by forcing them to rely on testimony from officers of the embattled Los Angeles Police Department. Deputy Dist. Atty. Ed Nison said prosecutors are asking the California Court of Appeal to halt jury selection in the case until the dispute over the statements can be resolved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rap star Snoop Doggy Dogg and his former bodyguard, who were acquitted of murder charges last month, will not be retried on lesser charges of voluntary manslaughter, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996
The Los Angeles Superior Court jury in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial, apparently struggling with a manslaughter charge, sent a note to the judge seeking guidance on their deliberations, it was learned Friday. It was unclear whether the jury had discarded the more serious charges of first- and second-degree murder against the rapper and his bodyguard, McKinley Lee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996
Jurors at the murder trial of rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg began deliberating his fate Friday after a prosecutor told the panel not to allow the defense to "demonize" the victim. Comparing victim Philip Woldemariam to the fictional character Bigger Thomas in the novel "Native Son," co-prosecutor Bobby Grace told the jury: "They are trying to portray Philip Woldemariam as an aggressive, wild person. Don't fall into that trap." The rapper, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, and former bodyguard McKinley Lee, 25, have been charged with murder in connection with the shooting death of Woldemariam at Woodbine Park on Aug. 25, 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996
The prosecution in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial concluded its closing arguments in Los Angeles Superior Court on Tuesday, telling jurors not to consider the rapper's star status when deciding his guilt or innocence. "He has to abide by the same rules and conduct that the rest of us do," co-prosecutor Ed Nison told the panel. The rapper, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, and his former bodyguard, McKinley Lee, have been charged with murder and conspiracy to commit assault in connection with Philip Woldemariam's shooting death on Aug. 25, 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg and his bodyguard went looking for a rival gang member in a Palms park in August 1993 then gunned him down to "teach him a lesson," a prosecutor told jurors Monday. In the first day of closing arguments, prosecutor Ed Nison told the racially diverse jury that the crime was anything but self-defense, as claimed by the rapper's lawyers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A verbal confrontation over gang loyalties outside Snoop Doggy Dogg's apartment triggered a fatal shooting by the rapper's bodyguard, a friend of the victim testified Thursday. In the most detailed description yet of the killing, Jason London described how a common street dispute suddenly turned into gunfire, much the way it does in the violent lyrics of some of the famed rapper's songs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A verbal confrontation over gang loyalties outside Snoop Doggy Dogg's apartment triggered a fatal shooting by the rapper's bodyguard, a friend of the victim testified Thursday. In the most detailed description yet of the killing, Jason London described how a common street dispute suddenly turned into gunfire, much the way it does in the violent lyrics of some of the famed rapper's songs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defense in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial completed its opening statements Tuesday, portraying the rapper's bodyguard as a family man who was merely doing his job when he shot and killed a hotheaded gang member who was looking for a fight after seeing Snoop on his Westside turf. "That shooting is completely consistent with self-defense," defense lawyer Donald Re told the jury.
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