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BUSINESS
April 19, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
A group that includes former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Roderick M. Hills, former U.S. Attorney General Elliot L. Richardson and San Diego Economic Development Corp. Chairman George W. Leiszhas begun a proxy fight aimed at unseating five of San Diego-based Oak Industries' eight board members. The dissident group will sponsor a board majority that would be "independent" of current Oak Chairman E. L. McNeely, according to a prepared release issued Tuesday by Hills.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
A group that includes former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Roderick M. Hills, former U. S. Atty. General Elliot L. Richardson and San Diego Economic Development Corp. Chairman George W. Leisz has begun a proxy fight aimed at unseating five of San Diego-based Oak Industries' eight board members. The dissident group, which calls itself the Committee to Improve Shareholder Value of Oak Industries Inc., will sponsor a board slate that would be "independent" of current Oak Chairman E. L. McNeely, according to a prepared release issued Tuesday by Hills.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1987 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Oak Industries Chairman E.L. McNeely has spent the past three years exorcising the ghost of Everitt A. Carter, his free-spending predecessor, from the Rancho Bernardo-based electronics company. Oak's anticipated return to profitability later this year would help McNeely bury that ghost and what the 68-year-old chairman has described as the "most distressing" period in Oak's 55-year history.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1985 | Bill Ritter
Now that E.L. McNeely has negotiated a cash infusion and restructured the back-wrenching debt of troubled Oak Industries, he may be able to fulfill a goal that has eluded him since he became Oak's chairman and chief executive a year ago: He may replace himself with a permanent executive.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1985 | BILL RITTER, San Diego County Business Editor
E. L. McNeely was under some peer pressure when he became acting chairman and chief executive of financially troubled Oak Industries last November: His fellow directors had threatened to resign if he didn't accept the jobs. "I insisted that the posts be temporary and part time," said McNeely, who until then kept busy playing golf and serving as a director of five other corporations, including Transamerica and Pacific Telesis.
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