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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991
Any changes being contemplated for John Wayne Airport's noise policy should include provisions to remove the MD-80 airplane from the airport. The MD-80 once was the bellwether of quiet jets at John Wayne Airport, but has since become an albatross. Technology has caught up with the MD-80, and there are now several alternative airplanes which are much quieter. If power cutbacks are a problem for safety, then quieter airplanes than the MD-80 should be required at John Wayne as a trade-off.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By John Horn
People who obsess about airline safety will doubtlessly be drawn to “Flight,” Nov. 2's drama about the culpability of alcoholic pilot Whip Whitaker (Denzel Washington) in an aviation disaster.  But there's one place you likely will never be able to see the movie: on an airplane. The fees that airlines pay for movies are but a small slice of a film's overall income, but in some cases can add up to several million dollars, which can benefit a risky drama like “Flight.” But Paramount Pictures, the film's financier and distributor, concedes “Flight” will be a tough sell to any airline, even though the carrier and the plane in the film are  fictional creations, and Whitaker's heroic flying may have saved countless lives.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1985
You recently published a letter from Nancy Willcox (Aug. 25) regarding John Wayne Airport and our MD-80. McDonnell Douglas has been, and continues to be, a leader in producing quiet, neighbor-friendly aircraft. The MD-80 was the first commercial transport certified under the Federal Aviation Administration's stringent Stage III Aircraft Noise Regulations, and brought a new level of quiet to airline operations at John Wayne and hundreds of other airports throughout the country. The basis of our objection to the proposed settlement is the establishment of sub-classes of noise regulation that disregard the community noise standards established by the FAA. We believe that creation of the Class AA category for John Wayne Airport promotes inefficient service and puts a premium on the use of smaller, lightly loaded aircraft in order to qualify for extra flights.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2010 | By Eric Torbenson
It's a two-Hershey-bar trip for Kristen Heller. Nine flights hopscotching six cities over 48 hours; for fliers, it's an itinerary that reads like a dare. For Heller, it's long enough to earn her two of her guilty-pleasure treats. But the 6,450 air miles aren't an unusual "sequence" for the American Airlines flight attendant to fly. As the breadwinner in her family at the moment, Heller flies as many hours as she can each month because flight attendants, like pilots, get paid only for the time the planes are moving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1985
Re Nancy Wilcox's letter complaining about MD-80 jet noise (Aug. 25): If she is a consultant, she should have enough "smarts" not to buy near an airport. Why pick on the McDonnell Douglas employees? They just build the MD-80. Blame the real estate developers. The airport was there first. DWIGHT H. CURTIS Anaheim
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1985
I refer to the McDonnell Douglas advertisement pushing expanded use of its MD-80 jet at John Wayne Airport (Aug. 18). The ignorance shown by McDonnell Douglas and its utter contempt for the about 60,000 residents impacted by the noise from the airport makes my blood boil. We are being driven crazy by the noise, mainly from the MD-80 jet, and are seeing our property values go down the drain. McDonnell Douglas has worldwide sales in the multibillion-dollar range. What makes its stated position particularly reprehensible is the fact that airline activity at John Wayne Airport is only a tiny factor in the financial success of McDonnell Douglas and in the continued employment of its workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2000
As an Alaska Airlines MD-80 captain, I take strong exception to your Feb. 11 editorial pertaining to the crash of Flight 261. I knew Capt. Ted Thompson and First Officer Bill Tansky very well. No one could have been more "freely focused on safety" than they; and any assertion to the contrary is a baseless lie. Your characterization that they "struggled" with the problem for two hours seems a highly charged choice of words. You weren't there. Flying the airplane without the autopilot has never been considered a reason for an emergency diversion, absent other extraordinary factors.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An American Airlines plane preparing for takeoff went off the runway and became stuck in mud at Richmond International Airport, shutting the two main runways and delaying nearly all incoming flights, an airport spokesman said. American Airlines flight 1239, bound for Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, was mired at the juncture of the two main runways about 8:20 a.m., airport spokesman Troy Bell said.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1997 | Associated Press
Great American Airways denied allegations that prompted the Federal Aviation Administration to ground the Reno-based charter carrier. "We are very disappointed that the FAA would take such action against one of the safest airlines in the world," said Vice President and General Manager Ken Damask.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writers
Delta Airlines placed a $2-billion order with McDonnell Douglas on Thursday for 80 commercial jetliners to be built at the firm's Long Beach plant, a sale ranking among the largest in the industry's history. The deal represents another in a long series of critical commercial sales and military contracts that the Douglas Aircraft unit in Long Beach has received in recent years, fueling rapid growth that is expected to double the firm's size by 1990.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2008 | Rick Popely, Chicago Tribune
American Airlines flew two MD-80 airplanes 58 times in December after pilots reported problems with the autopilot systems, a violation of safety regulations that potentially endangered passengers and crews, the government alleged Thursday. The Federal Aviation Administration slapped American Airlines with a heavy $7.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2008 | Harry R. Weber, The Associated Press
The Federal Aviation Administration is ordering U.S. airlines to conduct safety inspections to look for cracking on overwing frames on certain MD-80 series aircraft, a directive that could be a headache for an industry reeling from soaring fuel prices. The airworthiness directive, listed in the Federal Register on Tuesday, affects 670 MD-81, MD-82, MD-83, MD-87 and MD-88 aircraft registered in the United States. American Airlines, a unit of AMR Corp.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2008 | Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writer
American Airlines said it expected to resume a normal schedule today, ending a series of flight cancellations the airline was forced to make to inspect its MD-80 jetliners for compliance with federal safety rules. The airline said it canceled 200 flights Saturday as it completed the inspection of wires in the wheel wells of its aircraft.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2008 | Peter Pae and Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writers
American Airlines renewed its apologies Thursday to more than 200,000 passengers whose travel plans were disrupted this week. Almost 600 more flights were expected to be canceled today, and the airline said it would be at least Sunday before things were back to normal.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An American Airlines plane preparing for takeoff went off the runway and became stuck in mud at Richmond International Airport, shutting the two main runways and delaying nearly all incoming flights, an airport spokesman said. American Airlines flight 1239, bound for Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, was mired at the juncture of the two main runways about 8:20 a.m., airport spokesman Troy Bell said.
NEWS
August 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Alaska Airlines completed all 17 inspections of MD-80 aircraft midday Friday, the day after announcing that a tool used to measure stresses on the jets' tail sections may have given the wrong readings. Alaska spokesman Jack Evans said measurements did not show any additional wear and tear and the planes were back in service. Alaska said the tool, which the airline makes, could measure stresses on jackscrews in the MD-80s' horizontal stabilizers incorrectly.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By John Horn
People who obsess about airline safety will doubtlessly be drawn to “Flight,” Nov. 2's drama about the culpability of alcoholic pilot Whip Whitaker (Denzel Washington) in an aviation disaster.  But there's one place you likely will never be able to see the movie: on an airplane. The fees that airlines pay for movies are but a small slice of a film's overall income, but in some cases can add up to several million dollars, which can benefit a risky drama like “Flight.” But Paramount Pictures, the film's financier and distributor, concedes “Flight” will be a tough sell to any airline, even though the carrier and the plane in the film are  fictional creations, and Whitaker's heroic flying may have saved countless lives.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2010 | By Eric Torbenson
It's a two-Hershey-bar trip for Kristen Heller. Nine flights hopscotching six cities over 48 hours; for fliers, it's an itinerary that reads like a dare. For Heller, it's long enough to earn her two of her guilty-pleasure treats. But the 6,450 air miles aren't an unusual "sequence" for the American Airlines flight attendant to fly. As the breadwinner in her family at the moment, Heller flies as many hours as she can each month because flight attendants, like pilots, get paid only for the time the planes are moving.
NEWS
August 4, 2000 | From Reuters
Seven months after one of its MD-80s crashed off the coast of California, killing 88 people, Alaska Airlines is grounding up to 18 MD-80s in its fleet, the Federal Aviation Administration said Thursday. The FAA said Alaska Airlines had decided to stop flying the planes until it could further check the jackscrew controlling the MD-80's tail-mounted horizontal stabilizer after learning that some of the tools it used in previous tests may not have met the manufacturer's design specifications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2000
As an Alaska Airlines MD-80 captain, I take strong exception to your Feb. 11 editorial pertaining to the crash of Flight 261. I knew Capt. Ted Thompson and First Officer Bill Tansky very well. No one could have been more "freely focused on safety" than they; and any assertion to the contrary is a baseless lie. Your characterization that they "struggled" with the problem for two hours seems a highly charged choice of words. You weren't there. Flying the airplane without the autopilot has never been considered a reason for an emergency diversion, absent other extraordinary factors.
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