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Meal Programs

NATIONAL
June 1, 2003 | From Associated Press
An experimental program giving away fresh fruits and vegetables to students in select schools has been so successful that some lawmakers want to expand it nationwide. "I'd like to see this in every school in America," said Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, the senior Democrat on the Senate Agriculture Committee and its former chairman. "It would be one of the best health-care things we could do in this country," he added.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A resolution encouraging schools to offer a vegetarian option on lunch menus was approved by the state Assembly on Monday. The resolution, by Assemblyman Joe Nation (D-San Rafael), was approved 65-11. It calls on state education and health officials to develop a school lunch menu plan that includes vegetarian meals prepared without meat products, and vegan options that exclude meat, eggs and dairy. The menu plans would be voluntarily phased in over four years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2003 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
The bounty is impressive: 1.8 million servings of lettuce, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, bell peppers, chile peppers, carrots, onions, beets and strawberries per year. Incredible Edible Park in Irvine produces 600,000 pounds of food for those who can't afford to put food on their table. The farm's five acres are among the estimated 1,800 acres used partly or wholly for the same purpose throughout Orange County, once the fruit and vegetable basket of Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2003 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Every city is home to two countries: In one, people live well, hold lavish parties, dine on exquisite food. In the other, people know hunger, homelessness and poverty. For the last seven years Angel Harvest has sent its trucks to bridge the gap between the two, picking up excess food from the city's award shows, corporate parties and political bashes and delivering it to shelters and soup kitchens. "What we are is essentially the middleman," said Helen Palit. "We're a trucking company."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2003 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Opponents in this political debate look at a plate of food and see two very different things. City officials view free food as part of the problem. They blame outdoor meals offered by charitable groups for attracting homeless people and a slew of problems to their cities. Advocates for the poor see the food handouts as humanitarianism at its best, an effort by charitable groups to fulfill a responsibility to the poor that governments have failed to meet.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of hungry and homeless people came in from the chilly weather to celebrate Christmas Day at Atlanta's Turner Field, home of the Braves baseball team and the venue for one of the largest public holiday meals in the nation. About 18,000 people had a meal at the annual event, which was put on by Hosea Feed the Hungry and Homeless, a humanitarian group named after the late civil rights leader Hosea Williams. Donations and corporate sponsors covered the $60,000 cost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2002 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Has Santa Monica, which has long embraced liberal policies to help the homeless, come down with a case of compassion fatigue? Complaints from residents, merchants and tourists have mounted in recent months about homeless people sleeping in the doorways of downtown businesses, panhandling aggressively and setting up camp in prime parkland near the Santa Monica Pier.
HEALTH
August 19, 2002 | TRUDY LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Irene Christie is 93. She can no longer drive, stand for long, or cook, not even to bake the pies that were once her specialty. But when the San Dimas woman signed up for home-delivered meals, she had to wait nearly six months for the first one. Like thousands of seniors in Southern California who would benefit from meals delivered to their homes, she struggled to get by. A friend and her children sometimes brought her food, but she didn't like to ask for it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2001 | RACHEL D'ORO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The moose calf loitered near its dead mother when Billy Dickerson Jr. and his nephew arrived to collect the carcass. Dickerson and Cody Dyer parked their pickup truck near the sports center of Alaska Pacific University, in midtown Anchorage. Then they trudged through deep snow and dense woods behind the complex, heading uphill toward the dark form of the fallen cow. Startled, the calf bolted. "I think it's big enough to survive winter," Dickerson said of the calf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Lutheran Social Services has received a $15,000 grant from the Ventura County Community Foundation to provide aid to the homeless and working poor of the Conejo Valley. The money will be used for Conejo Valley meal sites and Shelter Rotation programs, said J.R. Jones, Lutheran Social Services' area director. The programs provide hot meals and counseling year-round and shelter from Dec. 1 to March 31 at seven sites.
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