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Meal Programs

NATIONAL
December 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of hungry and homeless people came in from the chilly weather to celebrate Christmas Day at Atlanta's Turner Field, home of the Braves baseball team and the venue for one of the largest public holiday meals in the nation. About 18,000 people had a meal at the annual event, which was put on by Hosea Feed the Hungry and Homeless, a humanitarian group named after the late civil rights leader Hosea Williams. Donations and corporate sponsors covered the $60,000 cost.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2002 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Has Santa Monica, which has long embraced liberal policies to help the homeless, come down with a case of compassion fatigue? Complaints from residents, merchants and tourists have mounted in recent months about homeless people sleeping in the doorways of downtown businesses, panhandling aggressively and setting up camp in prime parkland near the Santa Monica Pier.
HEALTH
August 19, 2002 | TRUDY LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Irene Christie is 93. She can no longer drive, stand for long, or cook, not even to bake the pies that were once her specialty. But when the San Dimas woman signed up for home-delivered meals, she had to wait nearly six months for the first one. Like thousands of seniors in Southern California who would benefit from meals delivered to their homes, she struggled to get by. A friend and her children sometimes brought her food, but she didn't like to ask for it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2001 | RACHEL D'ORO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The moose calf loitered near its dead mother when Billy Dickerson Jr. and his nephew arrived to collect the carcass. Dickerson and Cody Dyer parked their pickup truck near the sports center of Alaska Pacific University, in midtown Anchorage. Then they trudged through deep snow and dense woods behind the complex, heading uphill toward the dark form of the fallen cow. Startled, the calf bolted. "I think it's big enough to survive winter," Dickerson said of the calf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Lutheran Social Services has received a $15,000 grant from the Ventura County Community Foundation to provide aid to the homeless and working poor of the Conejo Valley. The money will be used for Conejo Valley meal sites and Shelter Rotation programs, said J.R. Jones, Lutheran Social Services' area director. The programs provide hot meals and counseling year-round and shelter from Dec. 1 to March 31 at seven sites.
NEWS
November 26, 2001 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's daybreak, and the Catholic nun, with her white habit tucked beneath her and bike helmet snapped in place atop her veil, is riding along Santa Monica beach while amused beachgoers yell, "The nun is back!" That's her again, sun barely risen, bicycling in Hancock Park and wishing a "good morning" to joggers and dog owners who smile and shake their heads in disbelief. On the Lord's day, it gets even better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2001 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denise Jones and C.L. don't know each other and will probably never meet. But the two women share an intimate relationship. They sustain each other through food. Jones and her colleagues cook it, and C.L. and her family enjoy the results. They are part of a new collaboration between the Salvation Army and Project Angel Food in training welfare recipients such as Jones for jobs in the food industry, while providing hot meals to people like C.L. with HIV or AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2001 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a slice of hot cheese pizza in one hand and a slushy, iced cappuccino in the other, Intan Sebastian, a junior at Reseda High, had a suggestion for adults who want to restrict what she eats at school. "They should worry about other things," Intan said during a recent lunch break in the campus courtyard. "For instance, we need more books." Long the target of kids grossed out by watery sloppy joes and tasteless meatloaf, school food is under fire from a different source: politicians.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | AARON ZITNER and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration on Thursday backed away from a plan to end mandatory testing for illness-causing salmonella in hamburger served in school lunches, only hours after the proposed change became widely known. Industry groups had lobbied to ease the zero-tolerance policy for salmonella, saying it was costly and unnecessary. A U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home-delivered meals are what keep people like 84-year-old Evelyn Osborne living in her Anaheim home and out of nursing facilities--saving taxpayers big money, social service experts say. But the three nonprofit organizations that bring her and 4,000 other Orange County seniors their meals say they are running out of money to keep the food coming. They say they will have to cut the number of people they serve if the county does not step in to help.
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