Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMeal Programs
IN THE NEWS

Meal Programs

NEWS
November 26, 2001 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's daybreak, and the Catholic nun, with her white habit tucked beneath her and bike helmet snapped in place atop her veil, is riding along Santa Monica beach while amused beachgoers yell, "The nun is back!" That's her again, sun barely risen, bicycling in Hancock Park and wishing a "good morning" to joggers and dog owners who smile and shake their heads in disbelief. On the Lord's day, it gets even better.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2001 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denise Jones and C.L. don't know each other and will probably never meet. But the two women share an intimate relationship. They sustain each other through food. Jones and her colleagues cook it, and C.L. and her family enjoy the results. They are part of a new collaboration between the Salvation Army and Project Angel Food in training welfare recipients such as Jones for jobs in the food industry, while providing hot meals to people like C.L. with HIV or AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2001 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a slice of hot cheese pizza in one hand and a slushy, iced cappuccino in the other, Intan Sebastian, a junior at Reseda High, had a suggestion for adults who want to restrict what she eats at school. "They should worry about other things," Intan said during a recent lunch break in the campus courtyard. "For instance, we need more books." Long the target of kids grossed out by watery sloppy joes and tasteless meatloaf, school food is under fire from a different source: politicians.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | AARON ZITNER and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration on Thursday backed away from a plan to end mandatory testing for illness-causing salmonella in hamburger served in school lunches, only hours after the proposed change became widely known. Industry groups had lobbied to ease the zero-tolerance policy for salmonella, saying it was costly and unnecessary. A U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home-delivered meals are what keep people like 84-year-old Evelyn Osborne living in her Anaheim home and out of nursing facilities--saving taxpayers big money, social service experts say. But the three nonprofit organizations that bring her and 4,000 other Orange County seniors their meals say they are running out of money to keep the food coming. They say they will have to cut the number of people they serve if the county does not step in to help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES and JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nonprofit organizations that provide thousands of homebound seniors with what is often their only meal of the day say they are running out of money to keep the food coming. Social service agency officials in Los Angeles and Orange counties say they may have to limit the number of elderly people they serve if federal funding fails to keep pace with the demand for home-delivered meals. Federal officials have relied on 1990 U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES and JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nonprofit organizations that provide thousands of homebound seniors with what is often their only meal of the day say they are running out of money to keep the food coming. Social service agency officials in Los Angeles and Orange counties say they may have to limit the number of elderly people they serve if federal funding fails to keep pace with the demand for home-delivered meals. Federal officials have relied on 1990 U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2001 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stormy weather doesn't make cafeteria manager Linda Dinkins worry about her students the way she once did. The children of Russell Elementary School now eat lunch inside warm bungalows on cold mornings and rainy days. Cafeteria workers prepare meals in a portable kitchen on campus instead of hauling food via golf cart from the kitchen of a nearby middle school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2000 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When classes start this week, many of the kids who play at the Garden Grove Boys & Girls Club will heartily welcome the hot lunches they get at school. They don't always taste great, the kids say, but it feels good to have a full stomach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Students in six Orange County school districts will face higher lunch prices when classes begin this month, an increase officials said is being driven by the rising cost of food and heftier pay for cafeteria workers. After 19 years of keeping prices steady, Garden Grove schools have increased the lunch charge to $1 in elementary schools and $1.25 in middle and high schools.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|