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Measles

NEWS
January 13, 1989 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control on Thursday recommended two significant changes in the routine for measles vaccinations: an extra shot for many infants and re-vaccinations for older children if an outbreak hits their schools. The CDC's measles specialists, who once expected to eradicate measles in the United States by 1982, now say the new measures are necessary to prevent continuing outbreaks of the disease. "We view these recommendations positively.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1991
Los Angeles County reported 4,030 confirmed cases of measles in 1990, including 27 deaths, but the epidemic appears to be coming under control, according to health officials. Dr. Shirley L. Fannin of the county Department of Health Services said that fewer than 100 measles cases were reported from October to December. About 160 measles cases are expected this month, compared to 268 confirmed cases in January, 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990 | LANIE JONES
An Orange County baby has died from complications of measles, the second such death this year, a Health Care Agency official reported Thursday. That news along with about 70 reported measles cases since the first of the year means that an epidemic of the childhood disease is continuing unchecked, county epidemiologist Thomas F. Prendergast said. "We had hoped that it might go away" when the numbers appeared to drop last December, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1987
An outbreak of measles has been reported in Los Angeles County high schools, with the most cases at one South Bay school, county Department of Health Services officials said Tuesday. Since late November, there have been more than 35 cases of clinically diagnosed measles among students attending South High School in Torrance. And sporadic cases and small clusters of cases have also been reported in high schools in other areas, health officials said.
NEWS
June 27, 1989
Responding to a nationwide measles outbreak, the American Academy of Pediatrics has decided that all middle-school-age children should receive a second measles shot. The decision was a change in position for the prestigious medical group, said Dr. Milton Schwarz, president of the Orange County chapter. Twenty-four states, including California, have reported 5,569 cases this year, a 300% increase over the same period last year, the National Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. health officials were nearly ready to pronounce measles eradicated in the United States eight years ago. But cases of the disease have since soared, and doctors say it is because children are not being vaccinated. More than 26,000 cases of measles were reported in 1990, the federal Centers for Disease Control said last week. That is up from a low of 1,497 in 1983, when health officials considered declaring the disease eradicated in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1989 | LANIE JONES
Though experts say that a second measles shot could halt a national epidemic, public health officials in Orange County and around the state say they can afford to give only one to children of low-income families. California needed $14.5 million for measles and other childhood vaccines but received state and federal appropriations this fiscal year of only $10.7 million, said Dr. Loring Dales, chief of the immunization unit for the state Department of Health Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1988 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN, Times Staff Writer
More than 600 South Bay students were sent home this week because they could not prove they had been immunized against measles. Paul Mackey, administrator of special services for the Torrance Unified School District, said an audit by the county Department of Health Services found that 270 district students lacked proof of immunizations and they were sent home Monday and Tuesday from South High School and 11 other district schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1987
Thirty-three of the 43 students and teachers at a Torrance high school who have been stricken with measles caught the disease despite being immunized against it, county Department of Health Services officials said Tuesday. Some of those who developed measles despite immunization may have received shots while they were between the ages of 12 and 15 months, officials said. Medical experts have concluded that the immunization is more effective after the age of 15 months.
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