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Medal Of Honor

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NEWS
January 21, 1998 | Reuters
A retired Marine who fought off scores of Japanese soldiers for three days and helped secure U.S. victory in the bloody World War II battle for Okinawa received the nation's highest military medal Tuesday. President Clinton awarded retired Marine Gen. James Day, a Cathedral City resident, the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony nearly 53 years after the May 1945 battle for Sugar Loaf Hill on Okinawa.
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NATIONAL
March 18, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - It took decades, congressional legislation and a review of thousands of war records, but two dozen veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam received the Medal of Honor on Tuesday from President Obama at an emotional White House ceremony. "As one family member has said, this is long overdue," Obama told the single largest group of Medal of Honor recipients since 1945. The presentation came after Congress in a 2002 defense bill ordered a review of thousands of war records to determine whether Latino and Jewish veterans were denied the nation's highest military decoration because of discrimination.
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NEWS
February 26, 1994
Richard O'Kane, 83, retired rear admiral who won the Medal of Honor for commanding the storied Tang submarine in World War II. Under O'Kane, the Tang sank a Japanese ship every 11 days on five patrols and rescued scores of American fliers off the Japanese base at Truk. On Oct. 25, 1944, the Tang was destroyed when one of its torpedoes malfunctioned, circling back to hit the sub.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014
Ola Lee Mize Medal of Honor recipient dies at 82 Ola Lee Mize, 82, a Medal of Honor recipient who fended off enemy assaults and rescued wounded soldiers during the Korean War, died Wednesday in Gadsden, Ala., after a long illness. His death was confirmed by the Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Mize was an Army master sergeant in June 1953 when his company was caught in a heavy attack near Surang-ni, South Korea. He endured an intense barrage to rescue a wounded soldier, then routed enemy soldiers who had penetrated the Americans' trenches, inflicting heavy casualties.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | Associated Press
Federal authorities are cracking down on trafficking in unauthorized Medals of Honor, arresting a man for allegedly selling two replicas of the nation's highest military decorations at a collectables show. Robert S. Nemser, 57, is charged with selling the medals to an undercover agent, charging $510 for the Army version and $485 for the Air Force version and its service ribbon bar, the FBI said. The Navy also has a version of the medal.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | United Press International
The Army announced Friday it would not recommend awarding the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military award for valor, to a World World II veteran who charged he was earlier denied the award because of anti-Semitism. David Rubitsky, 72, of Milton, Wis., a Jew, said that as an Army sergeant on the South Pacific island of New Guinea, he single-handedly killed 500 to 600 Japanese soldiers from "a machine gun nest" on Dec. 1, 1942.
NEWS
March 25, 1995
Retired Brig. Gen. James H. Howard, 81, the only fighter pilot in the European theater of World War II to receive the Medal of Honor. In 1944, as Allied bombers flew over Germany, Howard single-handedly took on 30 Nazi aircraft that hampered the bombing mission. He destroyed at least four enemy airplanes and damaged others before he was forced to return to England. The Medal of Honor is the nation's highest military award.
NEWS
July 30, 1986 | Associated Press
A former Roman Catholic chaplain Tuesday renounced the Medal of Honor he won for heroism under fire in Vietnam, returning the nation's highest military honor to protest U.S. support of Nicaraguan rebels. His action, which supporters called unprecedented, was part of a new campaign by religious leaders and members of Congress who oppose the Reagan Administration on aid to the guerrillas, known as contras.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | Associated Press
President Clinton on Monday presented the Medal of Honor--the nation's highest military decoration--to the widows of two U.S. soldiers killed in Somalia, calling Master Sgt. Gary I. Gordon and Sgt. 1st Class Randall D. Shughart "real American heroes." At a solemn White House ceremony, Clinton presented the medals, the first such honors bestowed since the Vietnam War, to Carmen R. Gordon and Stephanie A. Shughart.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-one Asian Americans who fought in World War II for a country that doubted their loyalty will be awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest award for valor, by President Clinton next month. The veterans, each of whom previously received the second-highest citation, the Distinguished Service Cross, were chosen for the higher award after a special four-year review of their combat service by an Army panel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | David Colker
For extraordinary acts of courage during the D-day invasion of World War II, Walter Ehlers received the nation's highest military award - the Medal of Honor. And it changed his life. "I didn't have a life before the medal," Ehlers said in a 2004 Washington Post interview. A self-described "farmer boy" who not only took out enemy gun nests single handedly during the D-day operation, but also drew fire to himself so other soldiers could withdraw, Ehlers was invited to every presidential inauguration from Eisenhower on. He spoke all over the world to student, military and other groups.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - President Obama will seek to right a historical wrong next month when he awards two dozen veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam - including 17 Latinos - the Medal of Honor after a lengthy Pentagon review into racial and ethnic discrimination in the awarding of the nation's commendation for combat valor. Obama will present the medals to three Vietnam War veterans, and to family members of the 21 veterans who are receiving it posthumously, the White House said late Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- The secretary of defense announced Friday that he would not reconsider the Medal of Honor nomination of a Marine from San Diego who was killed in Iraq. Secretary Chuck Hagel agreed with his two predecessors that the nomination of Sgt. Rafael Peralta does not meet the "proof beyond a reasonable doubt" standard required for the nation's highest award for combat bravery. Peralta, an immigrant from Mexico who enlisted the day he received his green card, was killed in November 2004 while Marines were clearing houses in Fallouja of barricaded insurgents.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to correct a historic injustice, President Obama will award the nation's highest combat honor to two dozen veterans -- mostly Latino and Jewish -- who fought as far back as World War II but were denied the coveted Medal of Honor because of discrimination. Only three of the recipients are still alive. The campaign to issue the awards began in 2002 when Congress passed the Defense Authorization Act, which prompted a review of Latino and Jewish service members who had been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the nation's second-highest honor, but not the Medal of Honor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The U.S. Secretary of Defense is "familiarizing himself" with the history of one of the most controversial actions from the war in Iraq: the decision not to award the Medal of Honor to a Marine from San Diego killed in Fallouja in 2004. While not a full review of the case of Sgt. Rafael Peralta, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is looking at information given to him recently by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Alpine), a Defense official said Tuesday. Hunter, who served in Iraq as a Marine officer, has long campaigned to have Peralta awarded the Medal of Honor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2013 | Times wire services
Cpl. Rudy Hernandez, a son of California migrant workers who fought in the Korean War and was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1952, died Saturday at Womack Army Medical Center in Fayetteville, N.C.. He was 82 and had been diagnosed recently with cancer and other ailments. Hernandez, a fixture at Fayetteville veterans events, was grand marshal of the city's Veterans Day Parade last month. In August, Fort Bragg's Warrior Transition Battalion Complex was rededicated in his name. It was just after 2 a.m. on May 31, 1951, when Cpl. Hernandez felt the warm trickle of blood from a shrapnel wound on his head.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | From Associated Press
President Bush on Wednesday awarded the first Medal of Honor to a black soldier from World War I or World War II. The honor was presented posthumously to the sisters of Army Cpl. Freddie Stowers, who was mortally wounded in France 73 years ago while leading his company against a German-held hill. Georgiana Palmer, 88, of Richmond, Calif., and Mary Bowens, 77, of Greenville, S.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2007 | Bruce Smith, Associated Press
Amid the sound of battle cries and machine-gun fire, the stories of the nation's war heroes are now being told in a renovated museum aboard a moored aircraft carrier. The refurbished $1.5-million Medal of Honor Museum is set to open this weekend aboard the aircraft carrier Yorktown in Charleston Harbor as a tribute to the 3,444 recipients of the nation's highest military honor.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing is poised to receive the Medal of Honor a bit late: 150 years after his heroics at Gettysburg. Buried deep in a thick defense bill to fund modern-day weapons systems and military operations in Afghanistan is a measure to waive the time limit for posthumously awarding the nation's highest military honor to Cushing. The 22-year-old Union artillery officer refused to leave the battlefield even after being severely wounded during Pickett's charge July 3, 1863.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
At 19, John "Bud" Hawk had been in the Army a little more than a year when German tanks started blasting away at his machine-gun unit in a Normandy apple orchard. The Germans, hemmed in by Allied forces to the north and the south, were desperate to fight their way east, out of what was called the Falaise Pocket. Hawk's unit, while dramatically outnumbered, was an obstacle. Taking cover behind a tree, Hawk felt a burning pain in his right thigh when a German shell penetrated the trunk.
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