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June 15, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Timothy Jorden was well-known in the Buffalo, N.Y., area. His career began with a position as a weapons expert in the Army's Special Forces, included a stint as medic and eventually settled into  civilian life as a respected physician and surgeon. But the former military man also had his demons, ones that chased him through a series of incidents -- including cases of domestic violence, police said. On Friday, Jorden's body was found in a heavily wooded area in Lake View, N.Y., part of the town of Hamburg outside of Buffalo.
November 1, 2012 | By Jim Peltz
No timetable is set to replace Randy Bernard, whose departure as chief executive of the Izod IndyCar Series sparked a storm of protest from some media outlets and fans this week, interim IndyCar Chief Executive Jeff Belskus said Thursday. Making his first public comments since Sunday, when IndyCar announced that Bernard had stepped down, Belskus acknowledged in an interview that "Randy was very popular" and that IndyCar "has a lot of passionate fans. " "We do plan to conduct a thorough search for a permanent replacement," said Belskus, who is also CEO of IndyCar's parent, Indianapolis Motor Speedway Corp.
August 9, 2012 | By Jenny Deam, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
DENVER -- James Egan Holmes, the man accused of killing 12 people and injuring 58 others at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater on July 20, is expected to be in court Thursday in a hearing to unseal more details about the case. Twenty news media outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, have joined in a motion to ease a strict gag order imposed on the case by District Court Judge William Sylvester. That order bans anyone connected with the case from discussing it, including those at the University of Colorado.
Television networks, newspaper headlines and Web sites declared George W. Bush the 43rd president of the United States on Tuesday. Then they took it back early today. The tight race in Florida wreaked havoc with presidential projections Tuesday, prompting one of the national media's most embarrassing moments in history. "If you're disgusted with us, frankly, I don't blame you," Dan Rather told CBS viewers at one point in the evening.
March 21, 2014 | From a Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors announced Friday that there was not enough evidence to charge a suspect in the fatal stabbing of a Dodgers fan last September in San Francisco, according to a report from the San Jose Mercury News . Michael Montgomery, 21, was arrested last September but then released, with officials saying they lacked the evidence to charge him. Montgomery was one of two men held for questioning after the stabbing death of Jonathan Denver,...
January 16, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Huntington Beach police on Thursday were looking for additional possible victims of a man charged with using social media to gather lewd photos of underage victims. The 10 victims included at least one boy and ranged in age from 11 to 15 years old, according to the Huntington Beach Police Department. Police said Jackson Roland Westermeyer used a Kik Messenger app to solicit photos from some of the victims. He allegedly identified himself as a woman and used the name "KatKat777" when messaging victims, according to police.
September 26, 2012 | By Dan Turner
This is a corrected version of the original post; see the note below. It's a drag to be a cultural villain. Lawyers, politicians, unionized teachers -- all have felt the sting of public disdain for their careers, their ethics, themselves. And then there's the lowest of the low: journalists. Being one of that species, I know there's no way to defend the profession without appearing self-serving. But as I hear the unending criticisms of the media -- much of it coming from people who are media figures themselves, and part of it stemming from an intensive and purposeful campaign to discredit media outlets that don't slant the news toward a conservative viewpoint -- I can't help feeling that an awful lot of it reflects confusion and ignorance on the part of the critics.
January 23, 2012
Since taking office in 2007, Ecuador's President Rafael Correa has been in a war of words with the media in his country. He's used archaic libel laws to pursue criminal charges against the owners of El Universo and a columnist at the newspaper. His government has pushed through a law that severely restricts the media's ability to cover political campaigns and elections; indeed, it goes so far as to ban any media reports that can benefit or hurt a candidate. And now he's set his sights on international media observers.
April 11, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The Russian government has cut off broadcasts of Voice of America after a leading state media figure denounced the U.S. government-funded radio as "spam on our frequencies. " VOA's contract with the Russian media oversight agency wasn't renewed after it expired at the end of March because the Kremlin could no longer tolerate "its subversive, sanctimonious, self-serving propaganda," the Voice of Russia said in its account of the cutoff. The internal silencing of the broadcasts that beamed news and cultural programs into the Soviet Union during the Cold War represented the latest attempt by the Kremlin to eliminate media providing an alternative to those whose content and editors are controlled by the Russian government.
July 24, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman
In the day since Emily Maynard and Jef Holm revealed their engagement to the world, the happy couple have been busy doing the media rounds to spread the news of their romantic bliss. On Tuesday morning, the pair jumped on a conference call with a handful of media outlets to talk about wedding plans and how in love they were. But I would not be part of this lobbing of softballs. When it came time for me to ask my first question, I asked about something that has been perplexing a number of us in "Bachelorette" Nation for months: Why wasn't the show forthright about Jef's Mormon background?
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