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NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Names have always been the subject of magical thinking -- the ancient Romans buried lead tablets invoking the names of spirits, gods or the dead in order to curse their enemies, just as one example -- so maybe it shouldn't be too surprising that many people think uttering the name "James Holmes," like an unguarded mention of the name "Voldemort" in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series, will cause bad things to happen. Holmes, the suspected killer of 12 in an Aurora, Colo., movie theater last week, is the subject of a name-censoring campaign started by the family of one of his victims.
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NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Nevada GOP Senate candidate Sharron Angle has little love for the media these days. Now, she and her campaign are simply shutting out the Fourth Estate. In a radio interview aired this morning, the candidate made it clear that her campaign is not talking to reporters ? and her silence is journalists' fault because they're "unprofessional. " She added that others should follow her lead. "We need to bring back the professionalism into reporting, and I think that when we have an opportunity to teach a lesson, we should," Angle said in the interview with conservative talk show host Heidi Harris.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2010 | James Rainey
The Courier-Times--Telegraph arrives on driveways in Tyler, Texas, on Sundays with a pleasant thud. It can be thicker than a rib-eye steak and flecked with the sort of small-government red meat that satisfies the palates of its conservative readers. So the paper startled some readers last weekend when it ran a rare front-page editorial, one that took aim at the state's Republican governor. The piece urged Rick Perry to reverse his "unacceptable and undeserved silence" to debate his Democratic opponent and to meet with newspaper editorial boards, as he has in years past.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2010 | James Rainey
Everyone with a television camera or a notepad seemed to be converging on Florida this week to ask Terry Jones: Will you burn the Koran? Better questions might have been: Does God embrace bigots? Is there at least an ounce of shame in distracting the world from its real business? And when does Yosemite Sam get his mustache back? That last one because woolly-whiskered Jones' TV appearances this week unreeled like some madcap cartoon. The harrumphing, huckstering faux man of God growled threats at Islam, then purred about his hope for compromise, then growled again.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Let's start by looking at the picture of Ashley Judd, above, and note that many in the media (and the public) have been speculating of late about how she's losing her looks as she ages. As if. The media (and the public) went into overdrive recently, speculating over one of Judd's recent appearances in which she appeared "puffy faced. " She ruined her face with plastic surgery, or Botox, or something similar, the online world crowed. Now normally, Judd would have ignored all of this.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Oops. TV networks and other media are red-faced after a tough day in the Boston bombing investigation. Viewers unloaded on CNN after the cable network mistakenly reported Wednesday that a suspect was in custody. But the FBI and Boston police later said such reports were wrong. Online and on TV, CNN attempted to walk back its earlier reporting. "CNN has now thrown it to a panel to discuss how the President should fix CNN," Deadspin columnist Drew Magary sarcastically tweeted.
WORLD
February 26, 2014 | By Julie Makinen, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
BEIJING -- A recently dismissed Hong Kong newspaper editor was hospitalized in critical condition Wednesday after assailants wounded him in the back and leg and fled on a motorbike. The assault on Kevin Lau , whose removal as editor of the Ming Pao daily last month helped spark demonstrations over erosion of media freedoms, shocked a wide swath of the former British territory, which reverted to Chinese rule in 1997. Under an arrangement known as “one country, two systems,” Hong Kong is supposed to enjoy greater freedom of speech and the press, along with other liberties, than the mainland.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2009 | Associated Press
For the first time since an 18-year ban on news coverage of returning war dead was lifted, the media witnessed the arrival Sunday night of a soldier killed overseas. After receiving permission from family members, the military opened Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to the news media. An eight-member team wearing white gloves and camouflage battle fatigues carried the body of 30-year-old Air Force Staff Sgt. Phillip Myers of Hopewell, Va., off a jet in a solemn ceremony on a cool, clear night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1993
THE SENTINEL
WORLD
June 14, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - He'd already admitted that relations were too tight between politicians and Rupert Murdoch's media empire. But on Thursday, British Prime Minister David Cameron sat under oath, on the witness stand, answering questions and listening poker-faced as embarrassing evidence of his own coziness was read out loud in court. The grilling, in which a judge and the investigating lawyer often addressed him as "Mr. Cameron" and not "Prime Minister," was the latest chapter in a judicial inquiry on media ethics that he himself had initiated in light ofBritain'sshocking phone-hacking scandal.
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