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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1990
An article by Mr. Anthony Perry on Feb. 16 ("San Diego at Large") asserts that the Salk Institute does not encourage "media attention." Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, the same issue of The Times included an article on a new discovery made at the institute. Your reporter prepared it with the fullest cooperation of our scientists. At issue is the distinction between information and entertainment, a distinction that is in great danger of being blurred. The report on our recent discovery is information.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010 | James Rainey
Few newspapers or magazines escaped 2009 without losses and the Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles suffered like many others. Operators of the weekly news outlet trimmed staff. They cut salaries 20%. Still, they worried whether the Journal — chronicler of a variety of topics including Torah portions, sexual mores, Mideast politics and entertainment industry chatter — would make it to its 25th anniversary next year. But by banking hard on two of the most robust growth trends in 21st century media — niche journalism and philanthropy — the Jewish Journal appears to have extended its life expectancy and expanded its coverage of Jewish life in Southern California.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Nevada GOP Senate candidate Sharron Angle has little love for the media these days. Now, she and her campaign are simply shutting out the Fourth Estate. In a radio interview aired this morning, the candidate made it clear that her campaign is not talking to reporters ? and her silence is journalists' fault because they're "unprofessional. " She added that others should follow her lead. "We need to bring back the professionalism into reporting, and I think that when we have an opportunity to teach a lesson, we should," Angle said in the interview with conservative talk show host Heidi Harris.
WORLD
February 26, 2014 | By Julie Makinen, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
BEIJING -- A recently dismissed Hong Kong newspaper editor was hospitalized in critical condition Wednesday after assailants wounded him in the back and leg and fled on a motorbike. The assault on Kevin Lau , whose removal as editor of the Ming Pao daily last month helped spark demonstrations over erosion of media freedoms, shocked a wide swath of the former British territory, which reverted to Chinese rule in 1997. Under an arrangement known as “one country, two systems,” Hong Kong is supposed to enjoy greater freedom of speech and the press, along with other liberties, than the mainland.
OPINION
January 14, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
What a bizarre spectacle. Assuming he did not lie during his marathon news conference last week, the feeding frenzy surrounding New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will be remembered as one of those incredibly odd moments of elite journalistic hysteria that are difficult to explain to people who weren't there or didn't get it. I'm not referring to the scandal itself; that's easy enough to understand. What Christie's team did was outrageous and deserves as much foofaraw and brouhaha as the New Jersey media can muster.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2010 | James Rainey
The Courier-Times--Telegraph arrives on driveways in Tyler, Texas, on Sundays with a pleasant thud. It can be thicker than a rib-eye steak and flecked with the sort of small-government red meat that satisfies the palates of its conservative readers. So the paper startled some readers last weekend when it ran a rare front-page editorial, one that took aim at the state's Republican governor. The piece urged Rick Perry to reverse his "unacceptable and undeserved silence" to debate his Democratic opponent and to meet with newspaper editorial boards, as he has in years past.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2010 | James Rainey
Everyone with a television camera or a notepad seemed to be converging on Florida this week to ask Terry Jones: Will you burn the Koran? Better questions might have been: Does God embrace bigots? Is there at least an ounce of shame in distracting the world from its real business? And when does Yosemite Sam get his mustache back? That last one because woolly-whiskered Jones' TV appearances this week unreeled like some madcap cartoon. The harrumphing, huckstering faux man of God growled threats at Islam, then purred about his hope for compromise, then growled again.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2011 | James Rainey
In the new documentary film "Page One: Inside the New York Times," we see media columnist David Carr attending lots of conferences on the future of newspapers. People talk intently about new platforms, worry about endangered advertising models, and parse the viability of "pay walls. " Something else goes on at these powwows. "It's kind of lonely and scary out there," Carr tells us. "It's a way to sort of gather around a campfire and say, 'We're all right aren't we? We're OK.' … 'Yeah, we're fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
Keith Olbermann's back and he knows you missed him during all those long months since he quit his Current TV gig (or years since he left MSNBC), even if you didn't know it yourself. And so on Monday night he returned to to ESPN where, he will be happy to remind you every eight minutes or so, he helped found ESPN2 and perfect "SportsCenter. " He named this ESPN2 show "Olbermann," as if he were an iconic motor company or a beer, and opened it in classic Olbermann-ic style. "As I was saying," he greeted the camera, that careful quirk of a smile punctuating a pickup line so smugly flirtatious that it could have been lifted from Season 1 of "The Newsroom," which Olbermann claims to have inspired (though not Season 2, which is slightly less smug, certainly less flirtatious and better.)
NATIONAL
April 6, 2009 | Associated Press
For the first time since an 18-year ban on news coverage of returning war dead was lifted, the media witnessed the arrival Sunday night of a soldier killed overseas. After receiving permission from family members, the military opened Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to the news media. An eight-member team wearing white gloves and camouflage battle fatigues carried the body of 30-year-old Air Force Staff Sgt. Phillip Myers of Hopewell, Va., off a jet in a solemn ceremony on a cool, clear night.
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