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NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Nevada GOP Senate candidate Sharron Angle has little love for the media these days. Now, she and her campaign are simply shutting out the Fourth Estate. In a radio interview aired this morning, the candidate made it clear that her campaign is not talking to reporters ? and her silence is journalists' fault because they're "unprofessional. " She added that others should follow her lead. "We need to bring back the professionalism into reporting, and I think that when we have an opportunity to teach a lesson, we should," Angle said in the interview with conservative talk show host Heidi Harris.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
The Republican California political guru who crafted four successful Ronald Reagan campaigns, two for governor and two for president, does not watch Fox News or its conservative bobblehead pundits. Why not? Fox News has an agenda, 82-year-old Stuart Spencer said over breakfast in Palm Desert, where he and his wife make their home. Same is true of MSNBC, he said. One goes right and the other goes left, and Spencer doesn't see why those interested in educating themselves on matters of national importance would turn to either for reliable information.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2010 | James Rainey
The Courier-Times--Telegraph arrives on driveways in Tyler, Texas, on Sundays with a pleasant thud. It can be thicker than a rib-eye steak and flecked with the sort of small-government red meat that satisfies the palates of its conservative readers. So the paper startled some readers last weekend when it ran a rare front-page editorial, one that took aim at the state's Republican governor. The piece urged Rick Perry to reverse his "unacceptable and undeserved silence" to debate his Democratic opponent and to meet with newspaper editorial boards, as he has in years past.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Oops. TV networks and other media are red-faced after a tough day in the Boston bombing investigation. Viewers unloaded on CNN after the cable network mistakenly reported Wednesday that a suspect was in custody. But the FBI and Boston police later said such reports were wrong. Online and on TV, CNN attempted to walk back its earlier reporting. "CNN has now thrown it to a panel to discuss how the President should fix CNN," Deadspin columnist Drew Magary sarcastically tweeted.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2010 | James Rainey
Everyone with a television camera or a notepad seemed to be converging on Florida this week to ask Terry Jones: Will you burn the Koran? Better questions might have been: Does God embrace bigots? Is there at least an ounce of shame in distracting the world from its real business? And when does Yosemite Sam get his mustache back? That last one because woolly-whiskered Jones' TV appearances this week unreeled like some madcap cartoon. The harrumphing, huckstering faux man of God growled threats at Islam, then purred about his hope for compromise, then growled again.
WORLD
February 26, 2014 | By Julie Makinen, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
BEIJING -- A recently dismissed Hong Kong newspaper editor was hospitalized in critical condition Wednesday after assailants wounded him in the back and leg and fled on a motorbike. The assault on Kevin Lau , whose removal as editor of the Ming Pao daily last month helped spark demonstrations over erosion of media freedoms, shocked a wide swath of the former British territory, which reverted to Chinese rule in 1997. Under an arrangement known as “one country, two systems,” Hong Kong is supposed to enjoy greater freedom of speech and the press, along with other liberties, than the mainland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1993
THE SENTINEL
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2011 | James Rainey
In the new documentary film "Page One: Inside the New York Times," we see media columnist David Carr attending lots of conferences on the future of newspapers. People talk intently about new platforms, worry about endangered advertising models, and parse the viability of "pay walls. " Something else goes on at these powwows. "It's kind of lonely and scary out there," Carr tells us. "It's a way to sort of gather around a campfire and say, 'We're all right aren't we? We're OK.' … 'Yeah, we're fine.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2009 | Associated Press
For the first time since an 18-year ban on news coverage of returning war dead was lifted, the media witnessed the arrival Sunday night of a soldier killed overseas. After receiving permission from family members, the military opened Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to the news media. An eight-member team wearing white gloves and camouflage battle fatigues carried the body of 30-year-old Air Force Staff Sgt. Phillip Myers of Hopewell, Va., off a jet in a solemn ceremony on a cool, clear night.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2009 | Matea Gold
NBC Universal's announcement Monday that Ben Silverman is leaving the network after his two-year tenure did little to reverse its prime-time fortunes was one of the least surprising stories to hit the television industry in some time. What was unexpected was who broke the news -- and how. At 5:09 a.m.
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