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NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Names have always been the subject of magical thinking -- the ancient Romans buried lead tablets invoking the names of spirits, gods or the dead in order to curse their enemies, just as one example -- so maybe it shouldn't be too surprising that many people think uttering the name "James Holmes," like an unguarded mention of the name "Voldemort" in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series, will cause bad things to happen. Holmes, the suspected killer of 12 in an Aurora, Colo., movie theater last week, is the subject of a name-censoring campaign started by the family of one of his victims.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010 | James Rainey
Few newspapers or magazines escaped 2009 without losses and the Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles suffered like many others. Operators of the weekly news outlet trimmed staff. They cut salaries 20%. Still, they worried whether the Journal — chronicler of a variety of topics including Torah portions, sexual mores, Mideast politics and entertainment industry chatter — would make it to its 25th anniversary next year. But by banking hard on two of the most robust growth trends in 21st century media — niche journalism and philanthropy — the Jewish Journal appears to have extended its life expectancy and expanded its coverage of Jewish life in Southern California.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Nevada GOP Senate candidate Sharron Angle has little love for the media these days. Now, she and her campaign are simply shutting out the Fourth Estate. In a radio interview aired this morning, the candidate made it clear that her campaign is not talking to reporters ? and her silence is journalists' fault because they're "unprofessional. " She added that others should follow her lead. "We need to bring back the professionalism into reporting, and I think that when we have an opportunity to teach a lesson, we should," Angle said in the interview with conservative talk show host Heidi Harris.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2010 | James Rainey
The Courier-Times--Telegraph arrives on driveways in Tyler, Texas, on Sundays with a pleasant thud. It can be thicker than a rib-eye steak and flecked with the sort of small-government red meat that satisfies the palates of its conservative readers. So the paper startled some readers last weekend when it ran a rare front-page editorial, one that took aim at the state's Republican governor. The piece urged Rick Perry to reverse his "unacceptable and undeserved silence" to debate his Democratic opponent and to meet with newspaper editorial boards, as he has in years past.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Oops. TV networks and other media are red-faced after a tough day in the Boston bombing investigation. Viewers unloaded on CNN after the cable network mistakenly reported Wednesday that a suspect was in custody. But the FBI and Boston police later said such reports were wrong. Online and on TV, CNN attempted to walk back its earlier reporting. "CNN has now thrown it to a panel to discuss how the President should fix CNN," Deadspin columnist Drew Magary sarcastically tweeted.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Let's start by looking at the picture of Ashley Judd, above, and note that many in the media (and the public) have been speculating of late about how she's losing her looks as she ages. As if. The media (and the public) went into overdrive recently, speculating over one of Judd's recent appearances in which she appeared "puffy faced. " She ruined her face with plastic surgery, or Botox, or something similar, the online world crowed. Now normally, Judd would have ignored all of this.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2010 | James Rainey
Everyone with a television camera or a notepad seemed to be converging on Florida this week to ask Terry Jones: Will you burn the Koran? Better questions might have been: Does God embrace bigots? Is there at least an ounce of shame in distracting the world from its real business? And when does Yosemite Sam get his mustache back? That last one because woolly-whiskered Jones' TV appearances this week unreeled like some madcap cartoon. The harrumphing, huckstering faux man of God growled threats at Islam, then purred about his hope for compromise, then growled again.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Writer-director Michael Singh's documentary "Valentino's Ghost" connects the United States' Middle East foreign policy agenda to the American media's often negative portrayals of Arabs and Muslims. It's a provocative, absorbing - and at times dicey - study. Using film and TV clips plus archival news footage, the India-born Singh ambitiously tracks the on-screen depiction of Arabs starting in the 1920s when Rudolph Valentino melted hearts as "The Sheik" and Douglas Fairbanks swashbuckled his way through "The Thief of Bagdad.
OPINION
January 14, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
What a bizarre spectacle. Assuming he did not lie during his marathon news conference last week, the feeding frenzy surrounding New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will be remembered as one of those incredibly odd moments of elite journalistic hysteria that are difficult to explain to people who weren't there or didn't get it. I'm not referring to the scandal itself; that's easy enough to understand. What Christie's team did was outrageous and deserves as much foofaraw and brouhaha as the New Jersey media can muster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1993
THE SENTINEL
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