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OPINION
October 15, 2003
The U.S. Supreme Court pulled a shocker Tuesday when it let stand a controversial appeals court ruling that effectively lifts the federal threat against doctors who recommend marijuana in states where the practice is legal. The high court's decision not to accept an appeal of the U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2012 | Sandy Banks
It's a ritual that's beginning to make me feel less responsibly health conscious and more reliably heading toward old age. Every Sunday, I count out seven days' worth of a dozen different pills and load them into the daily compartments in my plastic medication bin. That's "geezer status," my daughter jokes, as I slip an extra set inside my purse, in case my memory-enhancing gingko biloba fails and I forget to swallow them before I leave home....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Local agencies, hospitals and businesses will provide free medical screenings and advice on healthy living at a Community Health Fair Saturday at Gelson's Village. Health care practitioners will be available to the community from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 22277 Mulholland Highway. Officials said the health fair is designed to detect illness and health problems in participants and even to help people keep their New Year's resolutions.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Word is that New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez flew to Germany earlier this month for a special treatment on his right knee and left shoulder -- on a recommendation from the Lakers' very own Kobe Bryant. Rodriguez received what's called platelet-rich plasma injections, or PRPs. Doctors will take a small amount of a patient's blood, centrifuge it to yield a concentration of platelets and inject it back into injured tissue. The idea is to supplement the growth factors and plasma cells in a person's blood with a concentrated dose in order to speed up healing of, say, a sore knee or a scarred Achilles' tendon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2012 | Sandy Banks
It's a ritual that's beginning to make me feel less responsibly health conscious and more reliably heading toward old age. Every Sunday, I count out seven days' worth of a dozen different pills and load them into the daily compartments in my plastic medication bin. That's "geezer status," my daughter jokes, as I slip an extra set inside my purse, in case my memory-enhancing gingko biloba fails and I forget to swallow them before I leave home....
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | STEPHEN FUZESI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Americans increasingly turning to the Internet for medical information, federal officials announced stepped-up efforts Thursday to counter fraudulent online claims that promise to cure ailments from arthritis to AIDS. More than 20 million Americans look to the Internet for health information--70% of them before visiting a doctor's office, according to the Federal Trade Commission.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Men interested in a permanent form of birth control are turning to an unlikely source for medical advice - "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" correspondent Jason Jones, who televised his vasectomy on Thursday night's program. As Jones describes it, he went to the doctor after suffering for five years from a mysterious malady that caused him to feel lethargic, gain weight and hear voices at night. The stunning diagnosis: "You have children. " And the condition was contagious, Jones explained: "Tragically, through unprotected intercourse, I had spread children to my wife," fellow "Daily Show" correspondent Samantha Bee . “Similar to herpes, you are stuck with children for the rest of you life.” The children the couple already had could not be “cured,” Jones said, but the simple procedure could prevent future “outbreaks.” So he went to Dr. David M. Weiner (yes, that's his real name)
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
We're so down for watching reality TV medical shows. Give us a half-ton man or some guy whose hands resemble trees and we're a happy clam. So we were thrilled when our editor passed along a link to a series of British shows called "Embarrassing Bodies. " With a title like that, you can only imagine. Before you click the link and watch the video clips, be forewarned: There are graphic images -- albeit in a medical context -- some of which are much more explicit than what we're used to seeing in the U.S. The show is pretty much what you'd imagine: People with embarrassing health issues seek treatment.
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | GORDON MONSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This, it seems, is the Phone Age. If you want to hear from Hulk Hogan and take the Hulkster's wrestling challenge, dial up 1-900-454-HULK. Lonely and want to listen to a throaty woman named Bev? Call 1-900-BEV-XXXX. But if you have a bellyache or a bad rash at 2:30 in the morning, would you call a Dial-a-Doc? Plenty have; they've reached out and touched real-life, licensed practicing physicians on call 24 hours a day. The first such service, Doctors By Phone, has been on line for nearly a year.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
We're so down for watching reality TV medical shows. Give us a half-ton man or some guy whose hands resemble trees and we're a happy clam. So we were thrilled when our editor passed along a link to a series of British shows called "Embarrassing Bodies. " With a title like that, you can only imagine. Before you click the link and watch the video clips, be forewarned: There are graphic images -- albeit in a medical context -- some of which are much more explicit than what we're used to seeing in the U.S. The show is pretty much what you'd imagine: People with embarrassing health issues seek treatment.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Men interested in a permanent form of birth control are turning to an unlikely source for medical advice - "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" correspondent Jason Jones, who televised his vasectomy on Thursday night's program. As Jones describes it, he went to the doctor after suffering for five years from a mysterious malady that caused him to feel lethargic, gain weight and hear voices at night. The stunning diagnosis: "You have children. " And the condition was contagious, Jones explained: "Tragically, through unprotected intercourse, I had spread children to my wife," fellow "Daily Show" correspondent Samantha Bee . “Similar to herpes, you are stuck with children for the rest of you life.” The children the couple already had could not be “cured,” Jones said, but the simple procedure could prevent future “outbreaks.” So he went to Dr. David M. Weiner (yes, that's his real name)
HEALTH
June 22, 2009 | Steve Dudley
Ten minutes into one of my favorite parts of church -- coffee hour -- I was sipping from my Styrofoam cup and enjoying the sugar buzz of a day-old doughnut when Paul snapped me out of my reverie. (Names have been changed.) "Hey, Steve, I've got this lump on my leg. Do you think it's serious?" Yep, I was being hit up for free medical advice again. "Gee, I don't know, Paul. Why don't you tell me about it?" "Well, it just showed up on my thigh. Do you think you could have a look at it?"
OPINION
October 15, 2003
The U.S. Supreme Court pulled a shocker Tuesday when it let stand a controversial appeals court ruling that effectively lifts the federal threat against doctors who recommend marijuana in states where the practice is legal. The high court's decision not to accept an appeal of the U.S.
NEWS
August 25, 2002
Gurmukh Kaur Khalsa is an expert on yoga ("Earth Mother, Yoga Star," Aug. 16). She obviously knows what she is doing to give mothers relaxation and serenity, and this doubtless has a positive effect on the unborn child. But she demonstrates the fatal flaw of many "gurus." Charles Lindbergh was an expert on aeronautics, but he expounded on (and was listened to about) politics when he had no more expertise than the person in the street. Gurus have an obligation to be careful about the spillover halo effect.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | FAYE FIORE and MARISA SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After 22 days of Cipro, an editorial assistant at American Media Inc. couldn't stomach it anymore. The nausea and cramps had her eating little more than rice cakes. Her personal physician was perplexed--he had never seen a case of anthrax in his career, so how could he advise her? He sent her to the local health department, which gave her an alternative antibiotic. "What do the doctors know?" the 44-year-old woman said with resignation, insisting on anonymity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1997 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. E-mail: rscheer@aol.com
Now that the McCaughey septuplets are out of imminent danger, it's possible to raise some impolite questions. First off, what's God got to do with it? Everyone from the parents to the doctors keeps talking about this being God's will, as if the Almighty compelled Bobbi McCaughey to become a guinea pig for modern science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1986 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
In a case that is attracting widespread attention, an El Cajon woman has been charged with contributing to her infant son's death by ignoring her doctor's advice and taking illegal drugs during pregnancy.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | STEPHEN FUZESI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Americans increasingly turning to the Internet for medical information, federal officials announced stepped-up efforts Thursday to counter fraudulent online claims that promise to cure ailments from arthritis to AIDS. More than 20 million Americans look to the Internet for health information--70% of them before visiting a doctor's office, according to the Federal Trade Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Local agencies, hospitals and businesses will provide free medical screenings and advice on healthy living at a Community Health Fair Saturday at Gelson's Village. Health care practitioners will be available to the community from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 22277 Mulholland Highway. Officials said the health fair is designed to detect illness and health problems in participants and even to help people keep their New Year's resolutions.
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