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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1994
The Medical Board of California licenses physicians and other medical professionals. It also investigates complaints about medical treatment and issues disciplinary actions. The most serious penalties include license revocation, suspension and probation. These are the Los Angeles County medical professionals subject to serious disciplinary actions between Nov. 1, 1993, and Jan. 31, 1994, according to medical board documents. Final actions are published only after all appeals are exhausted.
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NATIONAL
May 9, 2008 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Medicare proposed new rules Thursday to curb marketing abuses that have cropped up as the role of private insurance plans has grown in the giant healthcare program for the elderly and disabled. Critics called the rules an improvement, but questioned whether the federal government could adequately enforce them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2004 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
The number of storefront medical offices catering to a Latino clientele is surging throughout California as immigrants look for accessible and affordable health care -- with a flavor of home. More of these clinics -- common south of the border -- are opening as doctors and other businesspeople meet the growing demand in Latino neighborhoods.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2008 | From Reuters
Web search company Google Inc. is collaborating with Cleveland Clinic, one of the premier U.S. health institutions, to pilot an exchange of data that puts patients in charge of their own medical records. The healthcare industry has been trying to usher in a paperless era for more than a decade, holding out the promise that electronic medical records would bring significant cost savings. Currently, only a tiny minority of hospitals and primary care physicians use electronic medical records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2007 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Kaiser Permanente will be assessed a record fine today for its haphazard investigations of questionable care, physician performance and patient complaints at its California hospitals, according to state HMO regulators. The California Department of Managed Health Care said it will levy a $3-million fine against Kaiser, the largest HMO in the state, with 29 medical centers and more than 6 million members.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1992 | Michael Flagg, Times staff writer
Warning Signs: When people talk about how bad the job market is, they often point to the health-care industry as an exception: That's doing OK, at least . Now comes Elliot Gordon, a managing vice president for Korn/Ferry International, an executive recruiter in Newport Beach. Gordon says industries in decline often hire lots of top executives--hoping to reverse their fortunes--just before they go down the chute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2005 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
The financial condition of UCLA Healthcare, the largest medical complex in the University of California system, is deteriorating rapidly, and it will soon eliminate about 400 full-time positions to improve its bottom line, according to university officials. In addition to the immediate financial difficulties, construction on new UCLA hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica is running behind schedule and over budget.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California regulators cannot force the state's biggest HMO to pay for anti-impotence drug Viagra, a judge has ruled in a decision that might affect prescription coverage by other health plans. The state Department of Managed Health Care had required Kaiser Permanente to provide coverage of Viagra and other sexual-dysfunction drugs.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tenet Healthcare Corp., the Santa Barbara health-care giant, agreed to pay $850,000 to settle a federal lawsuit that accused 42 hospitals, including many in Southern California, of overbilling government health programs and private insurers.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | LINDA DARNELL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first blush, working as a file clerk in the medical records department at the now-defunct Fox Hills Hospital did not appear to be a route to a promising career for Crystal Alexander, then a 15-year-old high school student filling in part time for a worker on maternity leave. But 15 years later, Alexander is glad that the job was interesting enough that she stuck with it after high school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2007 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Kaiser Permanente will be assessed a record fine today for its haphazard investigations of questionable care, physician performance and patient complaints at its California hospitals, according to state HMO regulators. The California Department of Managed Health Care said it will levy a $3-million fine against Kaiser, the largest HMO in the state, with 29 medical centers and more than 6 million members.
HEALTH
July 16, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Electronic health records -- touted by policymakers as a way to improve the quality of health care -- failed to boost care delivered in routine doctor visits, U.S. researchers said last Monday. Of 17 measures of quality assessed, electronic health records made no difference in 14 measures, according to a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. It was based on a survey of 1.8 billion physician visits in 2003 and 2004.
HEALTH
May 14, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Researchers are developing a potential new weapon in the battle against obesity: training pediatricians and dietitians in a special interviewing technique designed to motivate parents of overweight kids to make healthy changes in their family lifestyles. The technique, motivational interviewing, involves asking open-ended questions (for example, "Could you tell me how you feel about your weight?").
NATIONAL
March 22, 2007 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that it would bar outside medical experts with a financial interest in a manufacturer from voting on advisory panels assessing whether drugs or other products made by that company are safe and effective. The proposed restrictions -- which would also apply to experts with ties to competing firms -- would significantly strengthen the FDA's conflict-of-interest policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2006 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday authorized health officials to negotiate nearly $100 million in contracts to help overhaul Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center during the hospital's downsizing, including up to $85 million to subsidize as many as 90 beds for county patients at nearby private hospitals. King/Drew, near Watts, is shifting specialty medical services and hospital management to Harbor/UCLA Medical Center near Torrance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2006 | Evelyn Larrubia, Times Staff Writer
Public hospitals and clinics across Los Angeles County could be forced to absorb hundreds of displaced doctors, nurses and other health workers as the county radically revamps Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center. Any plan for the troubled public hospital probably would require reassigning a good portion of its more than 2,200 employees so that King/Drew can get a fresh start with a new staff, three of Los Angeles County's five supervisors said last week.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1994 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine Southern California hospitals--including such high-profile institutions as Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and Pasadena's Huntington Memorial Hospital--said Monday that they have formed a new health care network they hope will give them more clout with insurers. A key function of the PrimeHealth network will be to negotiate with insurers on behalf of the not-for-profit hospitals and about 3,000 affiliated doctors as a single entity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2006 | Mai Tran, Times Staff Writer
A Huntington Beach man has been sentenced to 10 years in prison and ordered to pay more than $6 million in restitution for a Medicare billing scam in which unneeded motorized wheelchairs and other items were prescribed for patients. Prosecutors said that Phu Luong, 51, used the money he netted to buy a boat, expensive cars and a waterfront home, and pay off Las Vegas gambling debts.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2006 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush signed an executive order Tuesday that requires federally financed healthcare programs to gather information about the costs and quality of the medical care they pay for and to share it with consumers.
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