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Medical Care Industry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2005 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
The financial condition of UCLA Healthcare, the largest medical complex in the University of California system, is deteriorating rapidly, and it will soon eliminate about 400 full-time positions to improve its bottom line, according to university officials. In addition to the immediate financial difficulties, construction on new UCLA hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica is running behind schedule and over budget.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1994
The Medical Board of California licenses physicians and other medical professionals. It also investigates medical complaints and issues disciplinary actions. The most serious penalties include license revocation, suspension and probation. These are the Los Angeles County medical professionals subject to serious disciplinary actions between Feb. 1 and April 30, 1994, according to medical board documents. Final actions are published only after all appeals are exhausted. DOCTORS Joseph T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2003 | William Overend, Times Staff Writer
For almost a century, Santa Barbara has been a city with two hospitals. On Friday, one of them cleared a key hurdle to a major expansion. The other moved closer to at least partial demolition. The California attorney general's office, which regulates the sale and closure of nonprofit hospitals, gave formal consent Friday to the purchase of 95-year-old St. Francis Medical Center by Santa Barbara's Cottage Hospital, an even more venerable institution established in 1888.
HEALTH
November 1, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Many emergency room doctors and safety experts say they are all too familiar with the type of compressed-air gun injury that apparently killed a 21-year-old college student who was struck by a shot fired from a pepper-pellet gun by Boston police trying to control an unruly crowd after a Red Sox game on Oct. 21.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2005 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Tamika Henry carries a stethoscope in her bag. But that's about all she has in common with doctors who visited patients in the heyday of the house call. Her woven tote from El Salvador is a virtual office, carrying diagnostic tools and a pocket computer that gives her instant access to patient charts. "Dr. Tamika" -- as doting patients call her -- is a thoroughly modern physician helping to revive a bygone style of medicine.
HEALTH
July 5, 2004 | Jenny Hontz, Special to The Times
Brentwood real estate broker Joan Gardner was suffering such excruciating pain with a swollen knee, months after a fall, that she was homebound, depressed and unable to work. Her doctor and orthopedic physical therapist encouraged her to have surgery, but Gardner declined because, "I'm stubborn and vain." Instead, she decided to try something different.
HEALTH
June 13, 2005 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
The idea of giving doctors a "report card" to judge how well they are doing their jobs is gaining popularity in California and around the country. But could the practice also be leading some doctors to shy away from the sickest patients? Although many doctors loathe the idea, several states require physicians to report medical outcomes for many procedures. Health insurers are increasingly rating doctors' performance and tying doctors' pay to their scores.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tenet Healthcare Corp., the nation's second-largest hospital operator, said Monday that it was strengthening its compliance team. The Santa Barbara-based company, which has 40 hospitals and 35,000 employees in California, has been the subject of several regulatory investigations into its billing and recruiting practices Tenet named Cheryl Wagonhurst, 43, its chief compliance officer. She will oversee a 40-person team that will include clinicians, accountants and legal experts.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California regulators cannot force the state's biggest HMO to pay for anti-impotence drug Viagra, a judge has ruled in a decision that might affect prescription coverage by other health plans. The state Department of Managed Health Care had required Kaiser Permanente to provide coverage of Viagra and other sexual-dysfunction drugs.
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