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Medical Care Industry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2006 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
In the early evening of March 17, the man Erica McLean had hired to cure her husband of cancer arrived at their ranch in Sunland. David Chuah, a biochemist from Canada, carried a large brown bag brimming with pills, drops and powders, Erica recalls. Clive McLean, 60, was to take them in addition to the other therapies Chuah had prescribed during six months of treatment, she says.
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NEWS
September 21, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Beverly Hills cardiologist Debra R. Judelson owns what she describes lovingly as two "beautiful" pieces of equipment. They are cardiac echo machines--sophisticated devices that take moving, color pictures of the heart. The cost: $200,000 apiece. In two years, Judelson predicts, these machines will be rendered obsolete by technology that creates three-dimensional images. Ordinarily, she would update them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2006 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday authorized health officials to negotiate nearly $100 million in contracts to help overhaul Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center during the hospital's downsizing, including up to $85 million to subsidize as many as 90 beds for county patients at nearby private hospitals. King/Drew, near Watts, is shifting specialty medical services and hospital management to Harbor/UCLA Medical Center near Torrance.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal investigation of Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp. expanded to Las Vegas on Wednesday when state and federal agents conducted a search of Sunrise Medical Center, Nevada's biggest hospital. Agents from the state's Medicaid fraud division and the FBI conducted a search of the Columbia-owned hospital in connection with a criminal investigation of the facility, Nevada Atty. Gen. Frankie Sue Del Poppa confirmed.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the partisan acrimony and special-interest Angst over the GOP's Medicare reform plans, even the most far-reaching proposal--set for House passage today--would only postpone a financial crisis likely to make the current stakes seem like child's play.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | From Times wire services
At least 90% of large U.S. hospitals with more than 300 beds operate at or over capacity for treating patients and sometimes have to divert ambulances to other hospitals, a survey reported Monday. The finding suggests that many emergency rooms are unable to handle even the day-to-day stresses, let alone any big emergencies, experts say.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apria Healthcare Group Inc., under investigation by the U.S. attorney's office in Sacramento, said it is having trouble producing documents that justify its billing in federal health-care programs. In a report filed this week with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Costa Mesa home health-care giant said it discovered "errors" and "deficiencies" in supporting documents for billings to Medicare, Medicaid and other programs.
NEWS
June 3, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cigna Corp., one of the nation's largest health maintenance organizations, said Friday it will abandon the Medicare market, forcing more than 100,000 seniors nationwide to find new health insurance. The move, effective Jan. 1, 2001, is expected to be followed by other managed care companies, which have been scaling back their Medicare participation since the federal government three years ago began reducing the amount of money it pays to take care of seniors.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein
Headline writers understandably reached for the jumbo-sized type last week when Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft warned that Al Qaeda might be planning an attack in the U.S. this year.
HEALTH
June 26, 2006 | From Times wire reports
For-profit nursing homes and hospitals on average provide an inferior quality of care compared with their nonprofit peers, an extensive review of studies has found. Authors writing in the journal Health Affairs reported that a systematic analysis of 162 studies of nonprofit versus for-profit healthcare providers supports the concept that a facility's ownership status makes a difference in outcomes and in the cost of healthcare.
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