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Medical Care Orange County

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1997 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plan to boost the number of patients at UCI Medical Center--and derail the teaching hospital's controversial proposal to merge with a private health care chain--has been quietly added to the proposed state budget in Sacramento. Not only would the budget proposal stall the university's negotiations with the nation's two largest hospital chains, it also would require changes in how Orange County's Medi-Cal HMO program operates and would mean that other local hospitals would lose patients to UCI.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD
The Board of Supervisors this week directed county officials to identify preventive health-care and social-services programs that might receive more money in next fiscal year's budget. Board Chairman William G. Steiner proposed the action, saying the county needs to refocus priorities on programs that prevent larger social ills and "get the greatest return on our expenditures."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD
The Board of Supervisors today will consider a proposal by Chairman William G. Steiner tobolster preventive health care, social services and other community activities. Steiner is asking that the board direct county officials to consider funding increases in fiscal 1997-98 for programs that have been proven to prevent more serious--and costly--health and social problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1997 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Years of toil have broken many a farm worker like Genaro Saucedo, whose body looks older than its 78 years. A field hand since 1954, Saucedo walks in a crouch. His eyes sag. Too weary to work the fields, he now earns his keep by cleaning bathrooms in the labor camp where he lives. "I am dying," he sighs. Under an ambitious program unfolding along Orange County's rural edges, the sick and the weary among the farm workers, people like Genaro Saucedo, are receiving some sorely needed care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Thousands of schoolchildren in Orange County have eye exams each year, and those who need glasses but cannot afford them get spectacles through a number of school programs. Getting the kids to wear them, however, is another story. To help remedy that, a volunteer organization is taking free vision-screening a step further.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Years of toil have broken many a farm worker like Genaro Saucedo, whose body looks older than its 78 years. A field hand since 1954, Saucedo walks in a crouch. His eyes barely flicker. And still he tries to work. "I am dying," he sighs. Under an ambitious program unfolding along Orange County's rural edges, the sick and the weary among the farm workers, people like Genaro Saucedo, are receiving some sorely needed care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to help "the most vulnerable of our citizens," the chairman of the Board of Supervisors urged county leaders Tuesday to increase funding for preventive health-care programs, social services and other community activities. William G. Steiner's proposal, made during his State of the County Address, does not rely on new taxes or fees but rather asks county departments to look inside their budgets and allocate more money to programs proven to prevent greater social ills.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1997 | Barbara Marsh
Managed care has its limits, though. CalOPTIMA, initiated in the fall of 1995, is Orange County's ambitious experiment with managed care for hundreds of thousands of poor, elderly and disabled residents. Still, CalOPTIMA will stick with traditional fee-for-service medicine for one group that it's planning to add--the area's uninsured. The uninsured--a population estimated to be as high as 300,000 residents--have enormous, unpredictable needs for health care, say CalOPTIMA officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's Medi-Cal agency took the first step Tuesday toward revamping the county's troubled health-care program for medically uninsured people by approving a plan of action unlike any other in California. The board of directors of Cal-OPTIMA, which has brought 240,000 Medi-Cal recipients into managed care networks over the last 14 months, agreed to try bringing 30,000 indigent people--many of them seriously or chronically ill--under its enormous umbrella.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1996 | LISA RICHARDSON and JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Davida Gregory doesn't wonder if her kids are going to get sick, or whether they will need a doctor. With eight developmentally disabled children and young adults in her state-licensed group home, she knows one or the other will need medical attention at any given moment. Sometimes, it's an emergency, but more often it's routine: A 24-year-old with cerebral palsy needs physical therapy to help her walk and retain what remains of her independence.
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