Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMedical Care United States
IN THE NEWS

Medical Care United States

NEWS
September 16, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Monday announced a crackdown on Medicare fraud, targeting the burgeoning home health care market that accounts for a rapidly growing share of federal spending on the elderly. Under the president's plan, Medicare will stop signing up new home health care providers while the Health Care Financing Administration devises new regulations to better screen applicants.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest expansion of health care for children since Medicaid's creation in 1965, Uncle Sam is about to hand the states $24 billion to cover up to half of America's 10-million uninsured kids. But most states are already a step or two ahead of Washington. Using a variety of approaches, most notably broadening Medicaid eligibility, nearly every state, including California, has extended coverage to children of working but low-income families in recent years.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
Responding to growing frustration with managed care, President Clinton named a high-level commission Wednesday to protect patients from arbitrary rules and assure that quality care is not sacrificed for profits. The president charged the commission with developing a "Consumer Bill of Rights" that could serve as the basis for federal or state legislation or as a set of voluntary standards for insurance plans.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal advisory panel on Wednesday acknowledged in frustration that the medical community lacks remedies to help the nearly 4 million Americans chronically infected with Hepatitis C, a stubborn and wily virus that has eluded both an effective treatment and vaccine. Although the incidence of new Hepatitis C infections appears on the decline since its peak in 1989, there are an estimated 30,000 new cases annually in the United States and 8,000 deaths.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1997 | LINDA A. JOHNSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For the frantic parent with a child sick at 2 a.m., the weekend athlete with a painful injury and the worker just diagnosed with diabetes, medical hotlines are becoming the equivalent of "Dr. Mom."
BUSINESS
February 25, 1997 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the heels of a $325-million Medicare fraud settlement with SmithKline Beecham Clinical Laboratories, the federal government disclosed plans Monday for a major expansion of efforts to detect medical providers who bill Medicare and Medicaid for services they did not perform. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, leading a parade of officials to highlight the fraud issue, said companies dealing with the federal government's health programs should adopt voluntary internal guidelines to prevent or detect fraud.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
In an unusual move, the Justice Department is telling Congress it no longer will defend in court a federal law that allows Medicare and Medicaid payments to Christian Science care-givers. A federal judge in Minnesota ruled in August that such payments, permitted since the mid-1960s, violate the constitutional separation of church and state. In a letter to the Senate legal counsel, Atty. Gen.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About one-third of hospital patients feel poorly prepared to go home, have trouble getting questions answered or feel they don't have enough input on their treatment, a survey said. Boston-based Picker Institute, a health care consumer research firm, conducted the study. Picker surveyed 23,763 hospital patients and 13,363 patients in clinics or doctors' offices around the country in 1996. Its findings were echoed by focus groups conducted by the American Hospital Assn.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) said Monday that Medicare beneficiaries should expect to pay more to keep the huge health program on a sound financial basis. The comments were the strongest yet from a top-ranking Republican on the coming debate over Medicare, and they suggest a possible replay of two years ago, when an intense partisan battle ended with nothing being done to solve Medicare's looming financial failure.
NEWS
January 20, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three out of four insured U.S. workers received health coverage through managed care in 1995, a dramatic jump in two years fueled by both small businesses and self-insured large companies, a study said. In 1993, about half the Americans insured through employers were in managed care. That jumped to 73% by 1995, according to an article in the journal Health Affairs, published by Project Hope.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|