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Medical Care United States

NEWS
November 19, 1997 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A presidential commission today will propose a far-reaching health care "bill of rights" that could begin to swing the balance of power away from managed care companies and back toward patients. President Clinton is expected to embrace the recommendations and announce on Thursday how he proposes to make the rights a reality. "The public is . . .
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NEWS
November 18, 1997 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Congress voted last year to overhaul the nation's much-maligned welfare system, it explicitly sought to prevent poor children from losing their government-paid medical care. A year later, however, thousands of poor children have fallen out of the Medicaid program, even though they are still eligible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a study certain to throw fuel on the national debate over mental health coverage, researchers from Rand Corp. and UCLA found that offering broad mental health benefits would not add significantly to insurers' costs if a managed care approach is used. "You can provide unlimited benefits without breaking the bank," said economist Roland Sturm of Rand, who led the study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | From The Washington Post
The amount of medical care Americans receive in their final months of life varies enormously in different parts of the country, a new study says, suggesting that treatment depends on how much care is available to dying patients--not on how much they really need. The study found that on much of the East Coast, people are more than twice as likely to die in the hospital as people in the West.
NEWS
September 25, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Wednesday overwhelmingly approved a major overhaul of the Food and Drug Administration intended to streamline the regulatory approval process for new drugs and medical devices.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Monday announced a crackdown on Medicare fraud, targeting the burgeoning home health care market that accounts for a rapidly growing share of federal spending on the elderly. Under the president's plan, Medicare will stop signing up new home health care providers while the Health Care Financing Administration devises new regulations to better screen applicants.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest expansion of health care for children since Medicaid's creation in 1965, Uncle Sam is about to hand the states $24 billion to cover up to half of America's 10-million uninsured kids. But most states are already a step or two ahead of Washington. Using a variety of approaches, most notably broadening Medicaid eligibility, nearly every state, including California, has extended coverage to children of working but low-income families in recent years.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1997 | WILLIAM McCALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the worst winters in the history of North Dakota, where the National Guard is plowing snowy highways piled higher than 18-wheelers, doctors are having no trouble connecting with their patients. They just sit in front of an interactive TV set, or dial up a computer, and practice telemedicine, the technology that is changing the way health care is managed across rural America.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
Responding to growing frustration with managed care, President Clinton named a high-level commission Wednesday to protect patients from arbitrary rules and assure that quality care is not sacrificed for profits. The president charged the commission with developing a "Consumer Bill of Rights" that could serve as the basis for federal or state legislation or as a set of voluntary standards for insurance plans.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal advisory panel on Wednesday acknowledged in frustration that the medical community lacks remedies to help the nearly 4 million Americans chronically infected with Hepatitis C, a stubborn and wily virus that has eluded both an effective treatment and vaccine. Although the incidence of new Hepatitis C infections appears on the decline since its peak in 1989, there are an estimated 30,000 new cases annually in the United States and 8,000 deaths.
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