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Medical Care United States

NEWS
December 5, 1998 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health maintenance organizations--the crossbreeds of insurance companies and health care providers that were supposed to fix the nation's ailing health care system--are under such strain that many in the industry are predicting they will no longer keep their present form. The original, highly restrictive, clinic-based model with a limited list of doctors has already been replaced, some analysts and top executives say.
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NEWS
October 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
With a massive infusion of money for medical research, the new budget gives the government's health and human services programs their largest spending boost in seven years. Head Start, AIDS drugs and the fight against bioterrorism all get increases. Overall, the Health and Human Services Department will have about $40 billion to spend in 1999, up 10.3% from 1998. That's $1.3 billion more than Clinton requested.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doctors, nurses and hospice organizations have banded together to try to stop federal legislation that would undo Oregon's pioneering law making doctor-assisted suicide legal. While many of them oppose the practice, they fear that the bill would unintentionally discourage doctors nationwide from prescribing adequate pain-control medication for the terminally ill.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1998 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spending for health care in the United States rose a moderate 4.4% in 1996, the smallest increase ever recorded, and a strong signal that the once-volatile health sector is coming under financial control, the government reported Monday. The big political issue has shifted from controlling health-care spending to assuring that consumers receive quality care.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A presidential commission today will propose a far-reaching health care "bill of rights" that could begin to swing the balance of power away from managed care companies and back toward patients. President Clinton is expected to embrace the recommendations and announce on Thursday how he proposes to make the rights a reality. "The public is . . .
NEWS
November 18, 1997 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Congress voted last year to overhaul the nation's much-maligned welfare system, it explicitly sought to prevent poor children from losing their government-paid medical care. A year later, however, thousands of poor children have fallen out of the Medicaid program, even though they are still eligible.
NEWS
November 18, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Striving to build on their victory over President Clinton in the recent "fast-track" trade fight on Capitol Hill, liberals and their labor allies are thinking big again. What's more, they're aiming to take advantage of one of Clinton's prime assets: the current economic prosperity for which the president claims much of the credit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a study certain to throw fuel on the national debate over mental health coverage, researchers from Rand Corp. and UCLA found that offering broad mental health benefits would not add significantly to insurers' costs if a managed care approach is used. "You can provide unlimited benefits without breaking the bank," said economist Roland Sturm of Rand, who led the study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another indication of the growing acceptance of alternative medical approaches, a federal advisory panel Wednesday strongly endorsed the ancient Chinese medical practice of acupuncture for treating certain conditions, including nausea and postoperative dental pain.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While HMOs are winning the battle in the marketplace, they are faltering badly in their attempts to gain the confidence of Americans fearful that managed care is eroding the quality of the nation's health care system, according to a national study released Wednesday.
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