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NEWS
July 3, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
A woman arrives at the hospital with a condition called pulmonary hypertension. The arteries supplying her lungs are unable to deliver enough blood, which threatens their ability to delivery oxygen throughout her body. Making matters worse, she is 11 weeks pregnant, which puts additional strain on her weakened body. If the pregnancy continues, the woman surely will die. This was the situation confronting doctors last November at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix.
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OPINION
June 17, 2007
Re "Moore hype of healthcare film hits fever pitch," June 13 Why does The Times call a Medicare-like system for payment of healthcare in California a "nonstarter"? Last year, both houses of the state Legislature passed SB 840, which would have moved California in that direction, but the bill was vetoed by the governor. Is there anyone who wants to eliminate Medicare? No, because it works and has much lower overhead than private plans. A similar plan for California residents would work too, and cover everyone at a lower cost than our current, broken system.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Though the Great Recession took a much larger toll on African Americans and Latinos than on whites, members of all three groups were forced to cut back on medical services as a result of the economic downturn, research shows. Karoline Mertensen and Jie Chen of the University of Maryland's Department of Health Services Administration wondered whether the recession was having a disproportionate effect on minorities. After all, they noted, by 2009 the unemployment rate among African Americans was 14.8% and 12.1% for Latinos, while remaining at a relatively low 8.7% for whites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1985
Dr. Sidney M. Marchasin's article (Editorial Pages, Feb. 20) dealing with the Medicare guidelines to doctors and hospitals raises more questions than it answers. Certainly his compassionate, caring attitude toward the patients who come under Medicare is most welcome, but the doctors and the hospital administrators must take some responsibility for the financial difficulties that Medicare claims it is facing. Many of us in our senior years who are now eligible for care under the Medicare program cannot forget the manner in which the American Medical Assn.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1993
In reference to "One Casualty of Clinton's Health Plan: Freedom to Choose" (Sept. 22), I want to discuss reasons for specialization in medical practice and Park Nicollet cost saving and innovation. I agree with the main premise of the article, that medical care rationing is most likely in our future. Columnist James Flanigan is, however, perpetuating a myth that has gained wide acceptance through repetition by policy wonks and the media: that "the vast majority of medical students have gone into specialized practice because that's where the higher incomes have been."
BUSINESS
May 7, 1987 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD
QUESTION: My elderly mother has had one medical problem after another this year, and it seems to me that there is a price increase every time I have to take her to the doctor's office. Is it my imagination or is the cost of medical care rising faster than other costs?--W.E. ANSWER: You aren't imagining. According to the U.S. Department of Labor's records, health-care costs soared 7.7% last year, compared to a meager 1.1% rise in the consumer price index.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998
I feel compelled to write this letter in response to "Death of Patient at 44 After Surgery Raises Questions," July 27, concerning the death of Rudy Ruiz. I was the attending physician for Mr. Ruiz during his hospitalization at St. John's Hospital. I was shocked and saddened by the death of Mr. Ruiz. My heartfelt sympathy goes out to his wife and family. After reading the article, I was very frustrated. The article implies that Mr. Ruiz may have been discharged early in order to shorten his hospital stay, thus saving the medical group money.
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