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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Jason Wells
The mother of Jahi McMath, the 13-year-old Oakland girl who was declared brain-dead after a complicated surgery that involved removing her tonsils, insisted in a Facebook post this week that her daughter has improved physically, but that it continues to be an "unbelievably difficult time" for the family. Citing alleged death threats, the family has declined to say where they transferred Jahi's body after she was released by Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland to the county coroner.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Jason Wells
The mother of Jahi McMath, the 13-year-old Oakland girl who was declared brain-dead after a complicated surgery that involved removing her tonsils, insisted in a Facebook post this week that her daughter has improved physically, but that it continues to be an "unbelievably difficult time" for the family. Citing alleged death threats, the family has declined to say where they transferred Jahi's body after she was released by Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland to the county coroner.
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SCIENCE
June 15, 2013 | By Monte Morin
As prisoners continue to wage a hunger strike at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, a pointed opinion piece in the New England Journal of Medicine argues that military physicians who oversee such  feedings are guilty of aggravated assault and should refuse participation. "Force-feeding a competent person is not the practice of medicine; it is aggravated assault," wrote George Annas, a professor of medical law and ethics at Boston University and lead author of the article.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
Medical ethicists are criticizing the unnamed facility that agreed to keep the body of 13-year-old Jahi McMath on a ventilator after transferring her from an Oakland hospital, saying it will only delay the inevitable while potentially causing long-term financial and emotional harm to her family. Jahi's case has been widely criticized by medical experts who have emphasized that people who are declared brain-dead are no longer alive. At least three neurologists confirmed Jahi was unable to breathe on her own, had no blood flow to her brain and had no sign of electrical activity three days after she  underwent surgery Dec. 9 to remove her tonsils, adenoids and uvula at Children's Hospital Oakland and went into cardiac arrest, causing extensive hemorrhaging in her brain.
NEWS
August 26, 1991
My compliments to Pamela Warrick on her excellent two-part series. . . . Her report was both accurate and informative. As founder and president of a parents support group for high-risk infants and children since 1979, I have witnessed the toll for the care of these vulnerable infants escalate to phenomenal proportions. The emotional and monetary costs for the families involved is nothing short of staggering. Often, along with crushing medical expenses, comes the loss of a second income, since frequently, one parent must stay home to care for the medically or developmentally fragile child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2008 | Elaine Woo, Woo is a Times staff writer.
Dr. Jay Katz, a psychoanalyst and Yale Law School professor whose analysis of the conflicting interests and motivations of doctors and patients made him a leading authority on medical ethics, died of heart failure Monday in New Haven, Conn. He was 86. Katz was best known for his 1984 book "The Silent World of Doctor and Patient," which examined the complex factors that shape the physician-patient relationship and hinder the medical decision-making process. "This was his most significant work. .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1996 | JASON TERADA
The ethical issues raised by new medical developments for conceiving babies, and the role of personal responsibility in the rationing of health-care resources will be the focus of two public lectures at Cal Lutheran University on Monday. The free lectures, in Cal Lutheran's Samuelson Chapel, 60 W. Olsen Road, will be presented by Arthur Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
A defiant doctor, speaking for the first time since helping two women commit suicide last week, on Friday likened medical ethics in the United States to those of Nazi doctors. "I will not follow the example of those immoral Nazi doctors, which the rest of the doctors in this country seem to be doing," Dr. Jack Kevorkian told a secular humanist conference by telephone from Michigan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Jason Wells, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The attorney who successfully fought in court to keep 13-year-old Jahi McMath on a ventilator at an Oakland hospital for weeks after she was declared brain dead defended his actions this week, calling the case a fight for family rights. Christopher Dolan has been widely criticized as having fed false hope to the McMath family that somehow their daughter -- declared brain dead by at least three neurologists and issued a death certificate by the Alameda County coroner -- will recover.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Lee Romney
The family of 13-year-old Jahi McMath may have succeeded in transferring the brain-dead teen from an Oakland hospital to undisclosed care facility, but medical experts say it's only a matter of time before not even machines can keep her blood flowing. Bodies of the brain-dead have been maintained on respirators for months or in rare cases even years - and in a few other cases released to families. But once cessation of all brain activity is confirmed, there is no recovery,  said Rebecca S. Dresser, professor of law and ethics in medicine at Washington University in St. Louis, who served on a presidential bioethics council that in 2008 reaffirmed "whole-brain death" as legal death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014 | By Lee Romney
OAKLAND - The case of the brain-dead 13-year-old girl whose family was embroiled in a legal standoff with Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland seems to be nearing an end. After marathon negotiations with a federal magistrate, Jahi McMath's family members received approval to remove her body, while attached to a ventilator, from the hospital. On Sunday they quietly did so. The brain-dead girl was released first to the Alameda County coroner and then to the family, and is now the responsibility of her mother, who has moved her to an unnamed facility, the family attorney said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2013 | By Jason Wells
With the clock winding down on a court order keeping 13-year-old Jahi McMath on a ventilator, medical ethicists say the public drama over the brain-dead girl has fueled a misconception that her condition is somehow treatable. Multiple doctors, including a Stanford neurologist, have concluded that Jahi is brain-dead -- the result of complications from having her tonsils removed at Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland early this month. But her parents have fought to keep her on a ventilator, telling reporters they believe "there's still life there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2013 | By Lee Romney
OAKLAND - As the clock ticks toward a 5 p.m. deadline for Children's Hospital Oakland to remove a 13-year-old girl deemed brain-dead from a ventilator, experts in medical and legal ethics say there are no “gray areas” in the case and it should never have gotten this far. Furthermore, they warn, if the family of Jahi McMath were to find a facility to accept her, the hospital would set a troubling precedent if physicians there were to surgically insert...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Paige St. John
This post has been corrected. See the note below for details. SACRAMENTO - California's top prison doctor defends the court order to allow the force feeding of inmates on a 44-day hunger strike, saying that it gives physicians flexibility to make life-or-death decisions under difficult circumstances. However, a medical expert on prison hunger strikes says allowing prison doctors to disregard patient directives and revive and even feed protesters against their will is "medically inappropriate.
OPINION
July 6, 2013 | By Alka Pradhan, Kent Eiler and Katherine Hawkins
At least 106 of the 166 prisoners at Guantanamo Bay detention center are reported to be on hunger strike, with 45 currently being force-fed. A recently published report by the Constitution Project's Task Force on Detainee Treatment, to which we contributed, found that the practice of forced feeding at Guantanamo was "a form of abuse and must end. " A member of the task force, Dr. Gerald Thomson, described the process: "You are forced physically to...
SCIENCE
June 15, 2013 | By Monte Morin
As prisoners continue to wage a hunger strike at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, a pointed opinion piece in the New England Journal of Medicine argues that military physicians who oversee such  feedings are guilty of aggravated assault and should refuse participation. "Force-feeding a competent person is not the practice of medicine; it is aggravated assault," wrote George Annas, a professor of medical law and ethics at Boston University and lead author of the article.
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