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Medical Ethics

NEWS
April 16, 1992 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In her brief life, Theresa Ann Campo Pearson was a medical marvel, an ethical enigma and a cause celebre. Born without a fully formed brain, she lived for nine days and became the focus of an emotional national debate of the definition of death and the suitability of anencephalic infants as organ donors. But was Baby Theresa a person? Was she ever really alive? Two weeks after she was laid to rest in Hollywood, Fla., those vexing questions remain as the tiny infant's haunting legacy.
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NEWS
September 18, 1986
Leslie Steven Rothenberg, director of UCLA Medical Center's Program in Medical Ethics and an adjunct assistant professor at the UCLA School of Medicine, has been elected a Fellow of the Hastings Center, a research center for the study of ethical issues in medicine and biology. Rothenberg, a 1968 graduate of the UCLA School of Law, recently completed a six-year term as co-chairman of the Los Angeles County Medical and Bar Assns.' Joint Committee on Biomedical Ethics.
OPINION
December 13, 1998
"Inmate Seeks to Give Last Kidney to Daughter" (Dec. 5), involving California inmate David Patterson, has sparked my emotions for a few reasons. This situation should not be about medical ethics, or if the taxpayers should foot the bill. This is about saving this little girl's life, which her father might be able to do. If Patterson is willing to risk his life for his daughter's, then I say go for it. It seems like our society has gotten so cynical that we cannot see the greater good anymore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
Medical ethicists are criticizing the unnamed facility that agreed to keep the body of 13-year-old Jahi McMath on a ventilator after transferring her from an Oakland hospital, saying it will only delay the inevitable while potentially causing long-term financial and emotional harm to her family. Jahi's case has been widely criticized by medical experts who have emphasized that people who are declared brain-dead are no longer alive. At least three neurologists confirmed Jahi was unable to breathe on her own, had no blood flow to her brain and had no sign of electrical activity three days after she  underwent surgery Dec. 9 to remove her tonsils, adenoids and uvula at Children's Hospital Oakland and went into cardiac arrest, causing extensive hemorrhaging in her brain.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a 3-year-old, Paul Lozano amazed his Mexican immigrant parents by teaching himself to read in English. Announcing that his favorite writer was Dr. Seuss, he promptly devoured every book by the author that he could find. So when Lozano's oldest sister discovered books by Dr. Seuss among his possessions after he killed himself a quarter-century later, the memory carried bitter irony.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it first came to light last fall, the "Hospice Six" affair was regarded by most people here as a minor impropriety. Half a dozen nurses at the Hospice of St. Peter's had been accepting leftover morphine from the families of patients who had died. They had been storing it in a supervisor's unlocked desk drawer, then giving it to other terminally ill patients in emergencies, when pharmacies were closed. The nurses kept no written records. Dead patients' drugs are supposed to be destroyed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1987
All hospitals should employ a doctor highly trained in medical ethics to assist surgeons in making decisions about critically ill patients, a meeting of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons in Baltimore was told. "Virtually every major hospital in the country now has an ethics committee, but every ethics committee needs an ethicist as a resource person to whom they can turn," said Dr. Edmund Pellegrino, director of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1999 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a moment both heady and fearsome, Judith Fleming took a few short steps across a stage at UC Irvine's College of Medicine one recent evening--and one giant leap into the world of science. She shook hands with a raft of deans and then was ritually cloaked in the jacket she someday will wear as a physician. The uninitiated might assume it was an age-old ritual--but so-called white-coat ceremonies like this were unknown a decade ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Paige St. John
This post has been corrected. See the note below for details. SACRAMENTO - California's top prison doctor defends the court order to allow the force feeding of inmates on a 44-day hunger strike, saying that it gives physicians flexibility to make life-or-death decisions under difficult circumstances. However, a medical expert on prison hunger strikes says allowing prison doctors to disregard patient directives and revive and even feed protesters against their will is "medically inappropriate.
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