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Medical Ethics

BOOKS
August 7, 1988
Incredible! What happened to medical ethics and the Hippocratic Oath that we have doctors who handpick their patients with health problems that don't make them feel uncomfortable or embarrassed? It seems to me that if they feel squeamish about any phase of handling seriously ill patients, they don't belong in the profession. ELEANOR BRALVER Sylmar
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NEWS
July 26, 1998 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monday, Jan. 12, unfolded for Dr. Eugene Turner as did most of his days. Between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., he saw a stream of patients at the Peninsula Children's Clinic here on the northern edge of Olympic National Park. All left feeling safe and cared for. So did their parents. Turner, a pediatrician who'd practiced in Port Angeles for 27 years, had that effect. With his tear-shaped eyes and white thinning hair and craggy features, the 62-year-old doctor conveyed boundless concern.
NEWS
September 18, 1986
Leslie Steven Rothenberg, director of UCLA Medical Center's Program in Medical Ethics and an adjunct assistant professor at the UCLA School of Medicine, has been elected a Fellow of the Hastings Center, a research center for the study of ethical issues in medicine and biology. Rothenberg, a 1968 graduate of the UCLA School of Law, recently completed a six-year term as co-chairman of the Los Angeles County Medical and Bar Assns.' Joint Committee on Biomedical Ethics.
OPINION
July 6, 2013 | By Alka Pradhan, Kent Eiler and Katherine Hawkins
At least 106 of the 166 prisoners at Guantanamo Bay detention center are reported to be on hunger strike, with 45 currently being force-fed. A recently published report by the Constitution Project's Task Force on Detainee Treatment, to which we contributed, found that the practice of forced feeding at Guantanamo was "a form of abuse and must end. " A member of the task force, Dr. Gerald Thomson, described the process: "You are forced physically to...
NATIONAL
August 10, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Murder or mercy killing? One story that dominated headlines this week raised that question in a particularly dramatic fashion: An Ohio man is accused of shooting to death his ailing wife of 45 years, possibly as part of a "death pact" promise to prevent her from suffering. In the coming years, many other Americans will be wrestling with similar questions about how, and when, to end their own lives or the life of a loved one. "This is going to become one of the great social challenges of the next 20 years," predicted Arthur Caplan, one of the nation's foremost bioethicists and director of the division of medical ethics at NYU Langone Medical Center.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In her brief life, Theresa Ann Campo Pearson was a medical marvel, an ethical enigma and a cause celebre. Born without a fully formed brain, she lived for nine days and became the focus of an emotional national debate of the definition of death and the suitability of anencephalic infants as organ donors. But was Baby Theresa a person? Was she ever really alive? Two weeks after she was laid to rest in Hollywood, Fla., those vexing questions remain as the tiny infant's haunting legacy.
OPINION
December 13, 1998
"Inmate Seeks to Give Last Kidney to Daughter" (Dec. 5), involving California inmate David Patterson, has sparked my emotions for a few reasons. This situation should not be about medical ethics, or if the taxpayers should foot the bill. This is about saving this little girl's life, which her father might be able to do. If Patterson is willing to risk his life for his daughter's, then I say go for it. It seems like our society has gotten so cynical that we cannot see the greater good anymore.
NEWS
August 25, 2010
When selecting a doctor, you might want to ask about his or her religious views. Why? The strength of a physician’s feelings of faith can influence the types of treatment they offer to their patients. A study published online Wednesday afternoon in the Journal of Medical Ethics found that doctors with “stronger religious faith” were less likely to talk with patients about treatment options that could shorten their lives, such as prescribing powerful pain medicines.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a 3-year-old, Paul Lozano amazed his Mexican immigrant parents by teaching himself to read in English. Announcing that his favorite writer was Dr. Seuss, he promptly devoured every book by the author that he could find. So when Lozano's oldest sister discovered books by Dr. Seuss among his possessions after he killed himself a quarter-century later, the memory carried bitter irony.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it first came to light last fall, the "Hospice Six" affair was regarded by most people here as a minor impropriety. Half a dozen nurses at the Hospice of St. Peter's had been accepting leftover morphine from the families of patients who had died. They had been storing it in a supervisor's unlocked desk drawer, then giving it to other terminally ill patients in emergencies, when pharmacies were closed. The nurses kept no written records. Dead patients' drugs are supposed to be destroyed.
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