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Medical Experiments

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NEWS
July 7, 1995 | Associated Press
Astronauts and cosmonauts conducted a final round of medical experiments Thursday while crew mates prepared the space shuttle Atlantis for its return from a historic U.S.-Russian docking mission. Atlantis, launched June 27 with five astronauts and a new two-cosmonaut crew for the Russian space station Mir, was scheduled to land at 7:55 a.m. PDT today at Florida's Kennedy Space Center with eight aboard, including astronaut Norman E.
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SCIENCE
November 19, 2006 | By Denise Gellene, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Resting on a hospital bed beneath a tie-dyed wall hanging, Pamela Sakuda felt a tingling sensation. Then bright colors started shimmering in her head. She had been depressed since being diagnosed with colon cancer two years earlier, but as the experimental drug took hold, she felt the sadness sweep away from her, leaving in its wake an overpowering sense of connection to loved ones, followed by an inner calm. "It was like an epiphany," said Sakuda, 59, recalling the 2005 drug treatment.
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NEWS
June 23, 1987 | United Press International
More than 80 twins, victims of gruesome medical experiments by Nazi death camp doctor Josef Mengele, will receive compensation from West Germany totaling more than $1 million, a lawyer announced today. Tel Aviv lawyer Aryeh Ben-Tov said each twin will receive a one-time payment of about $13,000 for mental and physical damage done to them during Mengele's experiments at the Auschwitz concentration camp during World War II.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal health officials said Wednesday that they will seek stricter enforcement of guidelines requiring federally funded medical researchers to promptly report all deaths or serious side effects that occur during the course of experimental medical treatments. The comments came in the aftermath of the death of an 18-year-old Arizona man who received gene therapy for a rare genetic disease.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Columbia astronauts soared past the halfway point of their 10-day space journey Sunday, focusing on experiments and photography as they spent a more relaxed day orbiting the Earth. After releasing one satellite and rescuing another last week, the five astronauts turned their attention to the mission's secondary goals--several scientific and medical tests. "Welcome on board Columbia on a Sunday afternoon," commander Daniel C.
SCIENCE
November 19, 2006 | By Denise Gellene, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Resting on a hospital bed beneath a tie-dyed wall hanging, Pamela Sakuda felt a tingling sensation. Then bright colors started shimmering in her head. She had been depressed since being diagnosed with colon cancer two years earlier, but as the experimental drug took hold, she felt the sadness sweep away from her, leaving in its wake an overpowering sense of connection to loved ones, followed by an inner calm. "It was like an epiphany," said Sakuda, 59, recalling the 2005 drug treatment.
NEWS
October 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
The space shuttle Columbia's astronauts got an orbital workout Friday as they pedaled at full speed around the world to see how their bodies were holding up after nearly two weeks in space. One by one, the crew members worked their way from 30% of maximum exercise capacity on the shuttle's stationary cycle to 60% and then to 100%. They breathed into a tube connected to a gas analyzer as they cycled; their heart rates and blood pressures also were monitored.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1990
Are you kidding? "Animals or Humans?" Shouldn't it be animals and plants and humans? Earth Day isn't even cold yet and The Times arrogance and ignorance are regrettably--even tearfully--promulgated by an unthinking and unfeeling editorial laureate for vivisectionist anxiety. Even if your specious logic were valid, the premise is still pathetic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1997 | DADE HAYES
As a 16-year-old Van Nuys High School student, Dimitry Bar has witnessed more surgical procedures--ranging from hysterectomies to complicated births--than most people would care to in a lifetime. What really makes him squeamish, though, has nothing to do with scalpels or blood. "The scariest thing I've seen here is that people get laid off in the health-care industry because of things like HMOs," he said.
NEWS
June 22, 1996 | From Associated Press
The doctors aboard the space shuttle Columbia served as patients Friday, slipping on bulky goggles for a study of motion sickness and strapping their feet into a muscle-measuring machine. It was the first full day in orbit for the seven shuttle astronauts, who set out Thursday on a 16- or 17-day flight to test the effects of weightlessness on the body. Two-thirds of all astronauts suffer from space motion sickness, whose symptoms include nausea and vertigo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1999 | ABRAHAM COOPER, Rabbi Abraham Cooper is the associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center
What if there was no Nazi hunter like Simon Wiesenthal to pursue the perpetrators of genocide? What if the U.S. bartered Auschwitz doctor Josef Mengeles' freedom in return for the results of his horrific experiments? What if postwar Germany had installed top Nazi doctors in the National Institutes of Health or as deans in leading medical schools or as surgeons general of the new German defense forces? Impossible, you say? A second-rate script or a third-rate novel?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1997 | DADE HAYES
As a 16-year-old Van Nuys High School student, Dimitry Bar has witnessed more surgical procedures--ranging from hysterectomies to complicated births--than most people would care to in a lifetime. What really makes him squeamish, though, has nothing to do with scalpels or blood. "The scariest thing I've seen here is that people get laid off in the health-care industry because of things like HMOs," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996 | DAVID R. BAKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In David Cooper's lab at Moorpark High School, the future careers of doctors and nurses are being hatched. The 22 sophomores around the room's lab stations Thursday morning belong to the school's new Health Science Academy, a program designed to give students interested in medicine an early start and tie high school classwork into a real-world context.
NEWS
June 22, 1996 | From Associated Press
The doctors aboard the space shuttle Columbia served as patients Friday, slipping on bulky goggles for a study of motion sickness and strapping their feet into a muscle-measuring machine. It was the first full day in orbit for the seven shuttle astronauts, who set out Thursday on a 16- or 17-day flight to test the effects of weightlessness on the body. Two-thirds of all astronauts suffer from space motion sickness, whose symptoms include nausea and vertigo.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Depending on the psychological baggage viewers bring with them, their reactions to sculptor Ron Pippin's provocative show at Burbank's Mythos Gallery may vary radically. At face value, Pippin's audacious yet weirdly elegant assemblages comport themselves with dark humor: They look like the innocent tinkerings of a gifted flea-market hound.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | Associated Press
Astronauts and cosmonauts conducted a final round of medical experiments Thursday while crew mates prepared the space shuttle Atlantis for its return from a historic U.S.-Russian docking mission. Atlantis, launched June 27 with five astronauts and a new two-cosmonaut crew for the Russian space station Mir, was scheduled to land at 7:55 a.m. PDT today at Florida's Kennedy Space Center with eight aboard, including astronaut Norman E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1986 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY and MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writers
The state attorney general's office is investigating whether a former state commissioner involved in the creation of an ill-fated Medi-Cal experiment, called Expanded Choice, would have profited from its implementation, a spokesman for the office said Tuesday.
NEWS
October 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
The space shuttle Columbia's astronauts got an orbital workout Friday as they pedaled at full speed around the world to see how their bodies were holding up after nearly two weeks in space. One by one, the crew members worked their way from 30% of maximum exercise capacity on the shuttle's stationary cycle to 60% and then to 100%. They breathed into a tube connected to a gas analyzer as they cycled; their heart rates and blood pressures also were monitored.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1990
You say, "To save the life of the lowliest child fated to live in the meanest circumstances in the most backward village in the furthest reaches of Bangladesh, we would countenance--regretfully, perhaps even tearfully--the death of any animal hamster to great whale." Who is "we?" What has this "we" ever done to save the life of the lowliest child in the poorest village in Bangladesh?
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