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Medical Insurance

August 2, 2009
Re: "At 53, it's time to put herself first," July 26: You picked the wrong subject for your money makeover and the wrong angle. Here is a woman who earns well above the average, has a health insurance plan paid for by her employer (the taxpayers) and will be enjoying a generous pension income. By the time she retires, her mortgage will probably be paid off, her kids will definitely be out of the house making their own way in the world, so the $5,335 monthly income will allow her to live quite comfortably.
September 10, 1987 | United Press International
Gov. Michael S. Dukakis, supported by influential legislative leaders, on Wednesday unveiled his program for universal medical insurance in Massachusetts--the first plan of its kind in the nation. Dukakis, a Democrat who is a presidential candidate, said that about 600,000 people under 65 in the state have no health insurance, although 73% of them have jobs or are dependents of employed people. "They are largely the working poor," Dukakis said at a Statehouse news conference.
October 28, 2004 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
Firing the first federal salvo in a "nationwide initiative" against what investigators describe as a Southern California-based medical insurance racket, a grand jury Wednesday indicted an Orange County surgery center on charges of defrauding health insurers of $34 million by bribing patients to undergo unnecessary procedures.
June 14, 1992
It is not a coincidence that we are paying the most-money per capita of any country in the world for medical care. Of the 100 highest-paid executives in California, five in the top 30 are executives of National Medical Enterprises, which runs acute care and psychiatric hospitals. One of these five, the highest-paid executive in California, was Richard Eamer, whose compensation for 1991 was $17,551,778--about 600 times that of some nurses employed by his company. Other executives who received record amounts headed pharmaceutical companies such as Milan Panic of ICN Pharmaceuticals, who was paid a total of $6.1 million in 1991.
May 10, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
One of the brothers behind the 1-800-GET-THIN ad campaign for weight-loss surgery faces the possible revocation of his medical license in a misconduct case filed by state regulators. The Medical Board of California accused Michael Omidi of "repeated acts of negligence" in treating two women, one who sought corrective breast surgery and a second who sought weight-loss surgery. The board alleged that Omidi provided "substandard care" in the treatment of the first woman and that his staff gave "inaccurate or misleading information" about the second woman's health, saying she had sleep apnea even though she had not been previously diagnosed with the disorder.
March 8, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
Mary Brown, a 56-year-old Florida woman who owned a small auto repair shop but had no health insurance, became the lead plaintiff challenging President Obama's healthcare law because she was passionate about the issue. Brown "doesn't have insurance. She doesn't want to pay for it. And she doesn't want the government to tell her she has to have it," said Karen Harned, a lawyer for the National Federation of Independent Business. Brown is a plaintiff in the federation's case, which the Supreme Court plans to hear later this month.
Selma Schimmel has beaten cancer, and she's now taking on the U.S. government and the health insurance industry. The 36-year-old founder of Vital Options, the Studio City-based support service for young cancer survivors, wants the Bush Administration and Congress to tighten what she considers to be discriminatory loopholes in medical insurance coverage.
March 11, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Dr. David Rizzo's love affair with Los Angeles was rock solid for decades. The first sign of trouble came last year, when the house-call foot doctor finally grew tired of logging so many hours in his car and decided to break off the relationship. Rizzo, 62, thought he was ready for semi-retirement, and he loves infernal heat. So he moved to Phoenix. In August. "The sky at night is a celestial event," Rizzo said of his new metropolitan mistress. But the sun kept coming up, shining brightly on a man who cast a long, lonely shadow in the Arizona desert.
January 30, 2003
Wow! What a great response speech to President Bush's talk on Tuesday by Gov. Gary Locke of Washington. Has he thought about running for president? If more Democratic leaders would voice the concerns of most of the Americans and stop groveling and licking Bush's cowboy boots, we could pull this country back from the brink of war and balance the budget once again. When will this war madness end? Where is the Democratic leadership demanding an end to Bush's destructive policies and assaults on our Constitution?
June 8, 2003
I accept, although I do not understand, that in the world of greed enough is never enough, but "Barbakow Quits as Tenet's CEO" (May 28) stunned me. In a country where so many people have no or little medical insurance, this man was paid $116 million for running a medical-care company at a loss. Along with the $116 million comes an astonishing "retirement" package that we mere mortals can hardly imagine. Not only does this seem to be ludicrous from a business point of view, but also raises the question of just how much profit is made from people's sickness if a company can afford to pay one man such an egregious amount of money.
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