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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2005 | Donna Horowitz, Special to The Times
A fertility doctor who implanted the wrong embryos in a woman and allegedly engaged in an 18-month cover-up has lost his medical license and must shut down his practice by Wednesday. The Medical Board of California decided last month that Dr. Steven Katz would no longer be allowed to practice medicine because he failed to tell the truth to the two women involved in the mix-up.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1992
Dr. Ivan C. Namihas, a Tustin gynecologist accused of about 50 instances of alleged sexual abuse of his patients, effectively lost his medical license Tuesday when he did not appear in Los Angeles County Superior Court to defend himself. In a letter mailed to the court, Namihas' attorney said "unending publicity" about the case was one reason the 59-year-old doctor decided to "surrender his medical license" and forgo a defense in court. Dep. Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990
State health officials have revoked the medical license of a longtime Long Beach obstetrician who they say injured four infants by prematurely administering anesthesia to mothers in labor, then using forceps improperly. Dr. Archibald F. Forster, 67, was ordered by the state Board of Medical Quality Assurance to surrender the medical license he was issued in 1954. Investigators determined his actions were "so far below the accepted standard of care" that they constituted "gross negligence and incompetence," according to the decision made public this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996
A Culver City physician who has performed 5,000 penile enlargement surgeries--and triggered scores of malpractice suits--had his medical license suspended Friday by a state administrative law judge who said he was guilty of gross negligence and incompetence. The ruling went against Dr. Melvyn Rosenstein, who in advertising calls himself the world's leading authority on penis enlargement surgery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
A Los Angeles psychiatrist agreed to have his medical license placed on probation last month after the Medical Board of California alleged he had controlling and improper relationships with two adult patients, a brother and sister. In an accusation filed by the Medical Board of California, the state agency that disciplines doctors accused Dr. Norman J. Lachman, 68, of Los Angeles, of striking and humiliating the brother -- including forcing the man to buy dog food, which he threatened to make him eat. In addition, the state alleged that Lachman had "very discomforting" sessions with the sister, telling her she was a "hot tamale" and instructing her to stop attending Alcoholics Anonymous meetings even though she had a drinking problem.
NEWS
June 22, 2003 | Lisa Falkenberg, Associated Press Writer
DALLAS -- Dr. Daniel Maynard took no appointments. Instead, hundreds of patients would wait for hours in the parking lot in a line that began forming the night before. "When you've got 300 people ahead of you, you know a production line is what he's doing," said former patient Walter Shearin, 53, who would wait eight to 10 hours to see Maynard and get his prescription for narcotics renewed. "It's a red flag." Maynard's practice was a red flag to state and federal authorities too.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1996
The medical license of Dr. Vicki G. Hufnagel, a controversial Beverly Hills gynecologist best known as an anti-hysterectomy crusader, has been revoked after a Superior Court decision upheld the original revocation issued in 1989. The latest action, taken on Sept. 3, comes after a lengthy series of appeals.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | Associated Press
A psychiatrist accused of having illicit relations with a Harvard Medical School student who later committed suicide gave up her medical license Thursday, days before a state hearing. Dr. Margaret Bean-Bayog, 49, has denied all allegations of impropriety in treating Paul Lozano, 28, who died in April, 1991, of a cocaine overdose. Bean-Bayog can continue to work as a psychotherapist but cannot prescribe medicine.
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