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Medical Malpractice Suits

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NEWS
October 3, 1991 | DARA McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Willie Harris, once a strong, able-bodied serviceman with plans to play professional basketball, testified Wednesday that Air Force doctors wrecked his knees--along with his career plans--by administering repeated injections of cortisone.
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NATIONAL
September 18, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
The White House rolled out a modest program Thursday examining ways to discourage frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits, but what was meant as a bipartisan overture was quickly denounced by Republicans and business and consumer groups as an empty gesture. The Obama administration said that it would offer $25 million in grants to identify practices that would reduce medical errors, scale back malpractice insurance premiums and spare doctors from nuisance litigation. Traditionally, Democrats have opposed changes in malpractice law, protecting the interests of trial lawyers who are a major source of fundraising support.
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NEWS
May 19, 1987 | Associated Press
A bill that would allow military personnel to file medical malpractice suits against the federal government for peacetime injuries suffered in military hospitals was approved Monday by the House Judiciary Committee. The measure was approved on a voice vote and sent to the House floor, despite objections raised by the Defense and Justice departments at a hearing in March. The Pentagon's general counsel, H.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2005 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
President Bush demanded congressional action this year to rein in "junk" lawsuits against doctors and hospitals, saying Wednesday that the time had come to impose federal restraints on a system traditionally left to the states. Taking his tort reform campaign to an Illinois county known as a hotbed of civil litigation, Bush said the prospect of big jury awards in medical malpractice cases was causing insurance rates to soar and doctors to abandon their practices.
NEWS
January 18, 1985 | United Press International
A record number of malpractice suits and large legal judgments are triggering a crisis in health care costs and services, an American Medical Assn. official warned Thursday. The AMA, which outlined the problem in a new report, said Americans are filing more than three times as many medical malpractice claims than they did a decade ago, and are winning record judgments.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | HELAINE OLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New studies by a Harvard University group and the Urban Institute have challenged some longstanding contentions by physicians who assert that they often are unfairly victimized by the wave of medical malpractice suits.
NEWS
February 8, 1985 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A closely divided state Supreme Court on Thursday upheld a state law capping lawyers' fees in medical malpractice suits. The 4-3 ruling was the third affirmance of sections of a major legislative overhaul of malpractice law, adopted in 1975 because of a threat that medical care would be curtailed in the face of spiraling malpractice judgments. Writing for the majority, Justice Otto Kaus said caps on lawyer fees are used often and their validity is "well established."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two key witnesses in the Menendez murder case were called to testify behind closed doors Friday at a hearing to determine whether tape-recordings of the defendants' psychotherapy sessions must remain confidential. Beverly Hills psychologist Jerome Oziel was questioned on the second full day of secret hearings.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2005 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
President Bush demanded congressional action this year to rein in "junk" lawsuits against doctors and hospitals, saying Wednesday that the time had come to impose federal restraints on a system traditionally left to the states. Taking his tort reform campaign to an Illinois county known as a hotbed of civil litigation, Bush said the prospect of big jury awards in medical malpractice cases was causing insurance rates to soar and doctors to abandon their practices.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2004 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
With emergency room doctors and nurses swirling around her in November, Michelle Geyer stroked and kissed her 7-year-old daughter's pale face, urging her to live. "I was telling her, 'We're going to go to Disneyland. We're going to get through this, honey. You can do it, baby. Come on,' " Geyer recalled. Jessie Marie Geyer didn't make it. According to autopsy results, Jessie died of septic syndrome caused by a bacterial infection that is commonly treated with antibiotics.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2004 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
With emergency room doctors and nurses swirling around her in November, Michelle Geyer stroked and kissed her 7-year-old daughter's pale face, urging her to live. "I was telling her, 'We're going to go to Disneyland. We're going to get through this, honey. You can do it, baby. Come on,' " Geyer recalled. Jessie Marie Geyer didn't make it. According to autopsy results, Jessie died of septic syndrome caused by a bacterial infection that is commonly treated with antibiotics.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | HELAINE OLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New studies by a Harvard University group and the Urban Institute have challenged some longstanding contentions by physicians who assert that they often are unfairly victimized by the wave of medical malpractice suits.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | DARA McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Willie Harris, once a strong, able-bodied serviceman with plans to play professional basketball, testified Wednesday that Air Force doctors wrecked his knees--along with his career plans--by administering repeated injections of cortisone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two key witnesses in the Menendez murder case were called to testify behind closed doors Friday at a hearing to determine whether tape-recordings of the defendants' psychotherapy sessions must remain confidential. Beverly Hills psychologist Jerome Oziel was questioned on the second full day of secret hearings.
NEWS
May 19, 1987 | Associated Press
A bill that would allow military personnel to file medical malpractice suits against the federal government for peacetime injuries suffered in military hospitals was approved Monday by the House Judiciary Committee. The measure was approved on a voice vote and sent to the House floor, despite objections raised by the Defense and Justice departments at a hearing in March. The Pentagon's general counsel, H.
NEWS
February 8, 1985 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A closely divided state Supreme Court on Thursday upheld a state law capping lawyers' fees in medical malpractice suits. The 4-3 ruling was the third affirmance of sections of a major legislative overhaul of malpractice law, adopted in 1975 because of a threat that medical care would be curtailed in the face of spiraling malpractice judgments. Writing for the majority, Justice Otto Kaus said caps on lawyer fees are used often and their validity is "well established."
NATIONAL
September 18, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
The White House rolled out a modest program Thursday examining ways to discourage frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits, but what was meant as a bipartisan overture was quickly denounced by Republicans and business and consumer groups as an empty gesture. The Obama administration said that it would offer $25 million in grants to identify practices that would reduce medical errors, scale back malpractice insurance premiums and spare doctors from nuisance litigation. Traditionally, Democrats have opposed changes in malpractice law, protecting the interests of trial lawyers who are a major source of fundraising support.
NEWS
January 18, 1985 | United Press International
A record number of malpractice suits and large legal judgments are triggering a crisis in health care costs and services, an American Medical Assn. official warned Thursday. The AMA, which outlined the problem in a new report, said Americans are filing more than three times as many medical malpractice claims than they did a decade ago, and are winning record judgments.
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