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Medical Parole

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- The state parole hearing for a semi-paralyzed child molester has been postponed indefinitely because officials can't find a place to house him without violating laws that bar sex offenders from living near schools or parks. Edward Ortiz, 58, has been chained to a Marin County hospital bed with a breathing tube in his throat for more than a year. He is incapable of getting up, but taxpayers have spent roughly $800,000 annually to post three guards by his bedside around the clock.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California Gov. Jerry Brown's prison policy is forcing a split personality with federal courts. Brown on Tuesday repeated his insistence he will take no move to further reduce prison crowding unless ordered (again) to do so, and he included no money for prison leases and other proposals in his 2013-14 state budget. At the same time, Brown's administration officials told a panel of federal judges Wednesday the governor is working behind the scenes on that very legislation. "Defendants are drafting legislative language for these measures, which will delineate potential changes to state law to: (1)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy and Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
State prisons can release comatose and physically incapacitated inmates on medical parole under a measure approved Tuesday by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger that is expected to save California at least $46 million annually. The legislation was one of 21 bills the governor signed, including a ban on modifying motorcycles to make them more noisy, a scale-back of an early release program at county jails and a 5-year extension allowing shoemakers to import kangaroo parts to California. Schwarzenegger said the medical parole bill includes a screening process to make sure public safety is not jeopardized by the early release of inmates, many of whom are guarded 24 hours a day even though they are confined to hospital beds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- The state parole hearing for a semi-paralyzed child molester has been postponed indefinitely because officials can't find a place to house him without violating laws that bar sex offenders from living near schools or parks. Edward Ortiz, 58, has been chained to a Marin County hospital bed with a breathing tube in his throat for more than a year. He is incapable of getting up, but taxpayers have spent roughly $800,000 annually to post three guards by his bedside around the clock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
The reasoning seemed disarmingly simple: In a time of fiscal crisis and over-crowded prisons, why should California spend hundreds of millions of dollars retaining prisoners so sick, aged, paralyzed or otherwise infirm that they are no longer a threat to the public? And so the Legislature passed a bill to permit medical paroles as both a humanitarian gesture and a way to save money for the state. But theory has collided with the reality that prosecutors will fight vigorously to keep even incapacitated prisoners behind bars, that the parole board can be a highly skeptical body and that some prisoners committed heinously brutal acts before they fell victim to the medical problems that rendered them "safe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- A Northern California man serving 68 years for a home invasion robbery is likely to be the first inmate released from state prison on "medical parole" under a controversial law passed last year meant to save the corrections department millions of dollars in treating and guarding medically incapacitated inmates. On Wednesday, the Board of Parole Hearings granted an application from Craig Lemke, 48, who in 2006 broke into an elderly couple's home, bound them with duct tape and robbed them of money, jewelry and firearms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Ten of California's sickest and most costly inmates ? some are in comas, some are paralyzed ? will be promptly scheduled for parole hearings, corrections authorities announced Wednesday. An article in Wednesday's Los Angeles Times detailed how, despite being chained to bed frames, such inmates are guarded around the clock by multiple corrections officers at an annual cost to taxpayers of roughly $800,000 per inmate. "You look at these inmates and say, 'This person is not going anywhere,'" said J. Clark Kelso, the receiver appointed by a federal court to oversee California's troubled prison health services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California Gov. Jerry Brown's prison policy is forcing a split personality with federal courts. Brown on Tuesday repeated his insistence he will take no move to further reduce prison crowding unless ordered (again) to do so, and he included no money for prison leases and other proposals in his 2013-14 state budget. At the same time, Brown's administration officials told a panel of federal judges Wednesday the governor is working behind the scenes on that very legislation. "Defendants are drafting legislative language for these measures, which will delineate potential changes to state law to: (1)
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chen Ziming, China's "black hand" dissident paroled from prison last year under pressure from the Clinton Administration, has been returned to custody to serve out a 13-year sentence for sedition, apparently because of his recent participation in efforts aimed at a national reassessment of the 1989 Tian An Men Square incident. Family members said police surrounded Chen's home late Sunday night after revoking the research scholar's medical parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
A degenerative nerve disease has left 57-year-old California inmate Edward Ortiz semi-paralyzed in a private Bay Area hospital for the last year. The breathing tube in his throat tethers him to a ventilator at one end of the bed; steel bracelets shackle his ankles to safety rails at the other. Still, California taxpayers are shelling out roughly $800,000 a year to prevent his escape. The guards watching Ortiz one day last week said department policy requires one corrections officer at the foot of his bed around the clock and another guard at the door.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- A Northern California man serving 68 years for a home invasion robbery is likely to be the first inmate released from state prison on "medical parole" under a controversial law passed last year meant to save the corrections department millions of dollars in treating and guarding medically incapacitated inmates. On Wednesday, the Board of Parole Hearings granted an application from Craig Lemke, 48, who in 2006 broke into an elderly couple's home, bound them with duct tape and robbed them of money, jewelry and firearms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
The reasoning seemed disarmingly simple: In a time of fiscal crisis and over-crowded prisons, why should California spend hundreds of millions of dollars retaining prisoners so sick, aged, paralyzed or otherwise infirm that they are no longer a threat to the public? And so the Legislature passed a bill to permit medical paroles as both a humanitarian gesture and a way to save money for the state. But theory has collided with the reality that prosecutors will fight vigorously to keep even incapacitated prisoners behind bars, that the parole board can be a highly skeptical body and that some prisoners committed heinously brutal acts before they fell victim to the medical problems that rendered them "safe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Ten of California's sickest and most costly inmates ? some are in comas, some are paralyzed ? will be promptly scheduled for parole hearings, corrections authorities announced Wednesday. An article in Wednesday's Los Angeles Times detailed how, despite being chained to bed frames, such inmates are guarded around the clock by multiple corrections officers at an annual cost to taxpayers of roughly $800,000 per inmate. "You look at these inmates and say, 'This person is not going anywhere,'" said J. Clark Kelso, the receiver appointed by a federal court to oversee California's troubled prison health services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
A degenerative nerve disease has left 57-year-old California inmate Edward Ortiz semi-paralyzed in a private Bay Area hospital for the last year. The breathing tube in his throat tethers him to a ventilator at one end of the bed; steel bracelets shackle his ankles to safety rails at the other. Still, California taxpayers are shelling out roughly $800,000 a year to prevent his escape. The guards watching Ortiz one day last week said department policy requires one corrections officer at the foot of his bed around the clock and another guard at the door.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy and Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
State prisons can release comatose and physically incapacitated inmates on medical parole under a measure approved Tuesday by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger that is expected to save California at least $46 million annually. The legislation was one of 21 bills the governor signed, including a ban on modifying motorcycles to make them more noisy, a scale-back of an early release program at county jails and a 5-year extension allowing shoemakers to import kangaroo parts to California. Schwarzenegger said the medical parole bill includes a screening process to make sure public safety is not jeopardized by the early release of inmates, many of whom are guarded 24 hours a day even though they are confined to hospital beds.
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chen Ziming, China's "black hand" dissident paroled from prison last year under pressure from the Clinton Administration, has been returned to custody to serve out a 13-year sentence for sedition, apparently because of his recent participation in efforts aimed at a national reassessment of the 1989 Tian An Men Square incident. Family members said police surrounded Chen's home late Sunday night after revoking the research scholar's medical parole.
WORLD
March 19, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Thirty members of Ladies in White marched through the streets of Havana to demand the release of dissidents jailed three years ago by President Fidel Castro's communist government. The women, who dress in white and march in silence, are relatives of 75 dissidents jailed in a crackdown on opposition to Castro's rule. Fifteen were freed last year on medical parole, but 60 are still behind bars. Ladies in White last year won the Sakharov Prize, the European Parliament's top human rights award.
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