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Medical Records

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NEWS
February 6, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an unexpected consequence of a gun control law that took effect Jan. 1, the names of people admitted for mental health treatment at California hospitals are being recorded in state law enforcement computers. Although meant to keep firearms away from those who are considered dangerous to themselves or to society, the practice also applies to psychiatric patients who voluntarily check themselves in for treatment and have no history of violent behavior.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Ani Ucar and Jack Leonard
A nursing assistant who worked at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is under investigation for allegedly sexually assaulting two patients while they were heavily medicated and too weak to resist, according to court records and interviews. The women came forward separately last year and gave Los Angeles police similar accounts about how a male employee assaulted them while they were being treated at the hospital. Detectives served a search warrant at Cedars-Sinai earlier this year to obtain disciplinary records for Guillermo Fernando Diaz, a nursing assistant who had been assigned to a heart patient area.
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NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Jon Healey
My last post , which attempted to rebut claims that Obamacare would have the Internal Revenue Service reviewing personal medical records, wasn't as reassuring to some readers as I'd hoped. In fact, several said the proof of the agency's interest in medical records was already out there, in the form of a class-action lawsuit filed this year that claims the IRS seized "at least 6 million identifiable medical records" belonging to about 10 million Americans. Reader "GIJay" asked, "Healy[sic]
SCIENCE
November 26, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Apparently, not all pills got the memo about, first, doing no harm. Many formulations of common medications contain high levels of sodium, and a new study finds that people who take those medications are 22% more likely to suffer a non-fatal stroke and 28% more likely to die of any cause than people who take the same medications in formulations that do not contain sodium. Among the patients in the study who took medications containing sodium, the median daily sodium dose from those medicines  alone was 106.8 millimoles a day -- higher than recommended daily maximum dietary intake of 104 millimoles a day. The newest study on sodium in medicines was published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal (BMJ)
BUSINESS
August 3, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
Dozens of hospitals across the country lost access to crucial electronic medical records for about five hours during a major computer outage last week, raising fresh concerns about whether poorly designed technology can compromise patient care. Cerner Corp., a leading supplier of electronic health records to hospitals and doctors, said "human error" caused the outage July 23 that it said affected an unspecified number of hospitals that rely on the Kansas City, Mo., company to remotely store their medical information.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2009 | W.J. Hennigan
Accessing your own medical records should be as easy as checking your online bank account, a new health-data group contends, and Monday it launched a website to promote better access. The site, HealthDataRights.org, was established by a group that is boosting greater personal use of electronic medical records. Only 15% of physicians track the records electronically, said James Heywood, a group founder.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Led by Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.), a number of House Republicans asserted this week that the newly scandalized Internal Revenue Service, in its role as Obamacare enforcer, would collect sensitive personal medical records . That was one of the latest reasons cited for repealing the 2010 law, formally known as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Where they came up with this specious idea is a bit of a mystery, because you...
NATIONAL
March 28, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that a California pilot who tried to hide that he was HIV-positive cannot sue for emotional distress after two federal agencies shared the man's medical information. In a 5-3 opinion , the court's conservative majority upheld the federal government's immunity from liability for a person who claims mental anguish or emotional distress, but who suffers no damage, such as loss of income. The decision reverses a ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit that had struck down a ruling by a lower court in San Francisco.
OPINION
December 17, 2006
Re "Life-or-death data," editorial, Dec. 11 The Times describes many problems with an employer-driven clinical database of patient healthcare data, but only touches the concerns that physicians share. These include the potential for the data to get into the wrong hands or to be manipulated or misinterpreted. Medical record keeping is best organized by physicians. Healthcare providers nationwide in health information technology collaboratives have been working to utilize the Internet for the efficient exchange of medical records data.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1998
Concerning your article about the dangers of private medical records becoming public ("Records No Longer for Doctors' Eyes Only," Sept. 1), it is interesting that you cited several cases where lives and livelihoods were jeopardized when mental health histories were discovered by others. Apparently the easiest way to engage in character assassination in our society is to imply that someone has a history of mental illness. Frequently there is no distinction made between the untreated and those who have been successfully helped.
OPINION
November 24, 2013 | By Michael P. Jones
I'm a stomach doc. I've seen thousands of patients, inside and out, for 25 years. I've done research, I've taught, I've been an administrator. And as the years rolled by, I've watched the healthcare industry begin to undo healthcare itself. It's complex, cumbersome and bureaucratic, and the bigger the practice or the clinic or the hospital and research facilities - like the universities I used to work at - the worse the problem. For a physician and his patient, the exam room visit is everything.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Next to our medical records, our most closely guarded secrets probably involve our household finances. So it's understandable that many of the half-million retirees currently receiving a public pension from California were freaked out recently when CalPERS, the state pension agency, announced it was poised to post their names, their monthly retirement stipends, and other personal information online in a very accessible way. There's no...
SCIENCE
July 16, 2013 | By Monte Morin
As the use of hormone reduction therapy becomes increasingly common in the treatment of prostate cancer, a new study has linked the practice to an increased risk of acute kidney injury. In a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , researchers examined the medical records of more than 10,000 men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer and found that use of androgen deprivation therapy , or ADT, was associated with a 2.5 times greater risk of acute kidney injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Anna Gorman and Abby Sewell
Five workers and a student research assistant at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center have been fired over privacy breaches involving patient medical records. Cedars-Sinai officials said in a statement that 14 patient records were "inappropriately accessed" between June 18 and June 24. Six people were fired over the breach: four were employees of community physicians who have medical staff privileges at the hospital, one was a medical assistant employed by Cedars-Sinai, and one was an unpaid student research assistant.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
Hospitals are increasingly switching from paper to electronic medical records but aren't necessarily using them to improve the quality or efficiency of care, according to a new report by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Forty-four percent of hospitals had basic electronic health records in 2012, up from 27% the previous year, according to the report. Overall, the number of hospitals using such medical records has tripled since 2010. Some of the biggest jumps occurred in  rural hospitals, which increased from 1 in 10 in 2010 to 1 in 3 in 2012.  More physicians also are using electronic records, with an increase from 26% in 2010 to 38% last year.
SCIENCE
May 30, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
My grandmother, who raised some great family dogs, always said that mutts made the smartest and healthiest pets. A new study of the medical records of more than 90,000 purebred and mixed-breed dogs suggests that there is some truth to Grandma's theories on canine health - but only to a point.  When it comes to genetic disorders in dogs, a Maltese isn't always more likely to suffer than a mongrel. Prevalence “among purebred and mixed-breed dogs depends on the specific condition,” said UC Davis animal physiologist Anita Oberbauer, lead author of a report published Tuesday in the online edition of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | KAREN KARLITZ
When KPC Medical Management went bankrupt and abruptly closed its doors last Nov. 20, 38 medical clinics were closed, affecting approximately 2,000 employees and more than 300,000 patients in Southern California. Patients didn't know where to retrieve their medical records or recent diagnostic test results. There was also concern about patients being charged a fee to get their records.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Jon Healey
My last post , which attempted to rebut claims that Obamacare would have the Internal Revenue Service reviewing personal medical records, wasn't as reassuring to some readers as I'd hoped. In fact, several said the proof of the agency's interest in medical records was already out there, in the form of a class-action lawsuit filed this year that claims the IRS seized "at least 6 million identifiable medical records" belonging to about 10 million Americans. Reader "GIJay" asked, "Healy[sic]
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Led by Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.), a number of House Republicans asserted this week that the newly scandalized Internal Revenue Service, in its role as Obamacare enforcer, would collect sensitive personal medical records . That was one of the latest reasons cited for repealing the 2010 law, formally known as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Where they came up with this specious idea is a bit of a mystery, because you...
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