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Medical Records

NEWS
October 29, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton today will propose far-reaching regulations that place strict limits on the dissemination and use of consumers' medical records. The proposed regulations would be the first federal standards designed to protect individuals' health information.
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NEWS
May 6, 1991 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators are concerned over their inability to get copies of the medical records of a key air traffic controller as hearings are set to open here today into the fatal collision of two airliners at Los Angeles International Airport last February. The crash that killed 34 people occurred when the controller, Robin Lee Wascher, gave a USAir jetliner permission to land on the same runway that she had just positioned a SkyWest commuter liner for takeoff.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of fruitless congressional efforts, the Clinton administration today will issue the first comprehensive regulations protecting the privacy of patients' medical records. The rules prohibit doctors, hospitals, HMOs and other health providers from sharing patients' medical records--except for treatment and payment. The new measure--considerably broader than earlier versions--covers all records, not just those stored electronically.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1991 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Aviation Administration has refused to turn over to investigators the medical records of an air traffic controller who directed two airliners onto the same runway at Los Angeles International Airport moments before one struck the other in a fiery crash. The National Transportation Safety Board had requested the records pertaining to Robin Lee Wascher and other controllers as part of its investigation to determine the cause of the Feb.
NEWS
January 20, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It didn't happen this way, but it could have: Only a few weeks before his inauguration, the President-elect experiences a recurrence of a potentially deadly form of cancer. He and his physicians are optimistic it can be controlled, but the outlook is far from certain. A nervous nation is transfixed by the heroic struggle that ensues. On the eve of Bill Clinton's inauguration, former Democratic presidential candidate Paul E. Tsongas is again battling lymphoma.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2006 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Five major U.S. corporations have joined forces to create a "medical Internet" on which some 2.5 million people can compile their personal health records in one location, providing convenient access to everything from prescriptions and cholesterol readings to family medical histories. The system, unveiled Wednesday, could reduce the chances of medical mistakes, improve treatment of chronic illnesses and eventually save billions of dollars by avoiding duplicative services, its designers say.
NEWS
August 5, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elvis Presley may have permanently left the building 20 years ago this month, but the King of Rock 'n' Roll has never gone away. More than 300 books have been published about the show business phenomenon who was found dead in his fabled Memphis mansion Aug. 16, 1977. There have been books by Elvis' relatives, former lovers, members of his inner circle known as the "Memphis Mafia" and ex-wife Priscilla.
HEALTH
September 8, 2003 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Requests by attorneys for Kobe Bryant seeking hospital medical records of the woman who accused him of sexual assault have raised questions about medical privacy and whether a new federal law provides sufficient protections. A sweeping federal law enacted in April was designed to prevent the release of medical information without first obtaining proper legal authority or the patient's consent.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | Times Wire Services
President Reagan took a shot today at Michael S. Dukakis for refusing to release his medical records amid rumors of mental depression, saying "Look, I'm not going to pick on an invalid." He later said he was "just trying to be funny" but "I don't think I should have said what I said." In Boston, Dukakis said, "We all occasionally misspeak," and no apology was really needed. "I'm a very healthy guy," he added.
HEALTH
April 24, 2000 | From Washington Post
Doctor groups and privacy advocates have charged that new government rules, touted as protecting patients' confidentiality, will instead make it easier for employers, researchers, law-enforcement officials, the federal government and others to gain access to people's medical records without their consent.
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