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NEWS
October 9, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a finding that raises provocative questions about how a father's drug use might cause birth defects in his children, researchers have found that cocaine can attach itself to human sperm without impairing the sperm's survival or mobility. The results, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., suggest that sperm might carry cocaine or other toxins into an egg, triggering the kind of developmental problems in offspring already seen in animal studies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Charles F. Farthing, a physician who was at the forefront of care for HIV/AIDS patients and who drew attention to the need for an AIDS vaccine by announcing his willingness to inject himself, has died. He was 60. Farthing, who collapsed in a Hong Kong taxi April 5, had a heart attack, family members said in an announcement. Farthing was chief of medicine for the Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation from 1994 to 2007. He was planning to return to the foundation in June as director of treatment programs in the 32 countries outside the U.S. where it provides services.
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NEWS
April 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Research presented Monday by a UC Davis chemist suggests that chemicals in fresh-brewed coffee may form potent antioxidants, similar to vitamin C or vitamin E, which are believed to help prevent cancer. Takayuki Shibamoto, a professor of environmental toxicology, says that, based on his preliminary study, the antioxidants in a cup of coffee might be equal to the amount found in three oranges.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Evan Halper and Cindy Carcamo
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration handed backers of medical marijuana a significant victory Friday, opening the way for a University of Arizona researcher to examine whether pot can help veterans cope with post-traumatic stress, a move that could lead to broader studies into potential benefits of the drug. For years, scientists who have wanted to study how marijuana might be used to treat illness say they have been stymied by resistance from federal drug officials. The Arizona study had long ago been sanctioned by the Food and Drug Administration, but under federal rules, such experiments can use marijuana only from a single, government-run farm in Mississippi.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writers
Gastric bypass surgery -- a treatment for obesity that is already known to reduce heart disease and diabetes -- decreases the incidence of cancer by 80% over the five years following the procedure, Canadian researchers reported Wednesday. The incidence of two of the most common tumors, breast and colon, was reduced by 85% and 70%, respectively, Dr. Nicolas Christou of McGill University in Montreal said.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | LAURA WILKINSON, Associated Press
The tearful and tearless both cry on William Frey's shoulder. Among those seeking his help since he published "Crying: The Mystery of Tears" three years ago were a woman whose husband alternated bouts of tears and laughter, and a restaurateur whose cooks cried chopping onions. For the restaurant owner, the answer was easy and time-honored: Chop the onions under a mist of water. Other times, it's more complicated.
NEWS
December 16, 1996 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For seven years, Scott Stokes conducted his own reckless inquiries into the physiological effects of pot. "I woke up to get high, and I got high to go to bed," recalled the 19-year-old from El Toro, who broke his marijuana habit only after he was arrested two years ago for burglarizing a head shop. "If I didn't have it, I would . . . start sweating, and when I'd breathe deep I'd get into these weird breathing patterns. "People say that marijuana is not addictive, but it's extremely addictive."
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
At least some cases of Parkinson's disease, a devastating neurological illness that affects as many as 500,000 Americans, may be caused by infection by a common soil fungus, researchers from UC Davis will report today.
OPINION
December 24, 2011
Chimpanzees have long done their part for medical research. They have been inoculated and infected; they have donated their blood. Their contributions have aided the understanding and treatment of hepatitis and autoimmune diseases. As man's closest primate relative, they are extraordinary stand-ins for humans. But advances in medical research and technology have made experimentation on chimps unnecessary in all but a few biomedical projects. That was the conclusion of a recent study by a committee of scientists and ethicists assembled by the Institute of Medicine.
SCIENCE
October 1, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
The way medical research is funded in the United States has been vastly altered over the last 20 years by advocates asking that research be focused on particular diseases, according to a new study. Since the 1980s, a growing number of health advocacy groups have lobbied Washington for research dollars. As these groups have grown in size, the new study says, they have begun to influence how the federal government, in particular the National Institutes of Health, allocates its dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday vetoed a bill that would have lifted a ban on women being paid for donating their eggs to medical research. The action came after conservative groups raised ethical issues about the sale of human eggs and six years after the practice was prohibited by the state. "Not everything in life is for sale nor should it be," Brown wrote in his veto message. Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla (D-Concord) introduced the measure, saying it was unfair that most other research subjects are compensated.
OPINION
June 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the more than two decades since the U.S. government declared chimpanzees in the wild to be an endangered species, not much has improved for those great apes. The threats of habitat loss, poaching and disease have only intensified. Now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed reclassifying captive chimpanzees as well, moving them from the "threatened" category to "endangered," a change that brings with it stricter guidelines covering the handling and use of the animals. In the future, any procedure that harms, harasses or kills a research chimp would require a permit.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2013 | By Julie Cart and Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday proposed extending tough new protections for chimpanzees in captivity, a shift that would place strict limits on primates' role as human surrogates in biomedical research. In reclassifying chimps as endangered, the agency would put new requirements on the declining number of scientists who rely on chimpanzees to devise vaccines for infectious diseases, develop treatments for cancers and autoimmune diseases, and investigate ways to block dangerous pathogens that might jump from primates to humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | From KTLA News
Loma Linda University officials have solved the mystery of some human skulls and other bones that were unearthed at a nearby construction site. Construction workers dug up several skulls and limbs, but an investigator from the coroner's office who looked at the remains determined that they didn't belong to victims of foul play. Instead, they were the remains of bodies that had been used in medical research at the university back in the 1930s or '40s. “What we found when we got down there today was several skulls and primarily some limb bones - mostly legs, a few arms” said Dr. Brian Bull, chair of the Loma Linda Pathology Department.
OPINION
April 2, 2013 | By Jessica Wapner
It would be fair to say that Patient 5 owes his life to medical research. Also known as David Aponte, he was the headlining success story from a recent clinical trial at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. The trial tested a new approach - in which a portion of the immune system is genetically altered and then reintroduced to the body - for treating an otherwise fatal leukemia. But when we celebrate the remarkable achievement made possible by the doctors behind the experimental treatment and the patients who volunteered themselves for research, there are two other guests of honor to include at the party: years and years of basic science, and the public dollars that funded them.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2013 | By Alana Semuels and Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Research into cancer, Alzheimer's disease and influenza may lose crucial funding even as scientists say they are on the cusp of medical breakthroughs. Deep federal budget cuts, known as sequestration, could lead to diminished funding for medical and scientific research, making some scientists question whether they should stay in the United States. If the cuts continue, scientists said, the United States could see promising graduate students going to countries investing heavily in scientific research.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
There's a lot a researcher can learn, it turns out, from studying some cells from a common farm pig. Assembling the genome, or DNA letters, of a domestic Duroc pig named T.J. Tabasco and comparing it with the genomes of the wild boar, the mouse, the dog, the horse, the cow - and yes, the human - members of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium were able to determine that Asian and European pig lineages split 800,000 to 1.6 million years ago, suggesting...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | From KTLA News
Loma Linda University officials have solved the mystery of some human skulls and other bones that were unearthed at a nearby construction site. Construction workers dug up several skulls and limbs, but an investigator from the coroner's office who looked at the remains determined that they didn't belong to victims of foul play. Instead, they were the remains of bodies that had been used in medical research at the university back in the 1930s or '40s. “What we found when we got down there today was several skulls and primarily some limb bones - mostly legs, a few arms” said Dr. Brian Bull, chair of the Loma Linda Pathology Department.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2013 | By Noam N. Levey, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - As the Obama administration begins to implement $85 billion in cuts to federal spending this year, no part of the budget other than defense will take a bigger hit than healthcare. And the so-called sequester appears likely to have a disproportionate effect on areas of the health system already hobbled by years of retrenchment or underfunding, including public health and medical research. Although the Medicare program will account for the largest chunk of dollars cut from healthcare simply because of its great size, the scheduled 2% reduction in its payments to doctors and hospitals is significantly smaller than what many public health and research programs face.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Herbalife International says it's all about helping people "pursue healthy, active lives. " UCLA's Geffen School of Medicine likes to think of itself as being in the forefront of medical research and modern healthcare. But the curious relationship between these two supposed champions of healthful living should turn your stomach. Herbalife is the Los Angeles nutritional supplement firm that has become the centerpiece of a ferocious Wall Street tug of war. The major player is hedge fund manager Bill Ackman, who contends that Herbalife is a scam to sell overpriced products by fooling people into becoming Herbalife "distributors" by implying the business will make them rich.
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