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NEWS
October 16, 1991 | SUSAN PATERNO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ruth Deadmon, a near mute, waits outside the office of Dr. Daniel Truong, desperately hoping her voice can be restored. Deadmon is typical of Truong's patients: She awoke one day with what she thought was laryngitis. It has lasted seven years. Deadmon's condition has become so severe she sometimes cannot eat. She no longer answers her phone.
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NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | Matt Pearce
The young New York woman had just gotten home from rehab but couldn't wait to shoot up again. Her parents, who lived in an affluent neighborhood of Long Island's Suffolk County, found her in the shower when they heard the water running too long. She had overdosed on heroin. By the time Suffolk County Police Officer James Garside and a firefighter arrived and pulled her out of the bathroom, she wasn't breathing. That's when they gave her a dose of naloxone, the go-to drug for treating heroin and painkiller overdoses.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1995
In a ceremony that featured tributes from patients and firefighters, the Burn Center at Sherman Oaks Hospital saluted its 25th anniversary Thursday by renaming the acclaimed facility after its founder and medical director. With the help of children who had been his patients, Dr. A. Richard Grossman unveiled a sign declaring it the Grossman Burn Center at Sherman Oaks Hospital.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
For centuries, legends of a “fountain of youth” have beguiled people across the globe. But Americans are decidedly uneasy about whether science should actually help people push death far into the future. Roughly half of Americans surveyed by the Pew Research Center said medical treatments that stretch lifespans to 120 years or more would be bad for society. Even more shunned the idea of undergoing such treatments to extend their own lives, Pew found. Pushing off death so far might seem like the stuff of science fiction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | KENDALL S. POWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Have you ever tried to read a newspaper with one hand?" asked Leslie McClellan. The 68-year-old man from Gainesville, Fla., knows that it's truly an exercise in frustration. Reading a newspaper is just one of life's daily activities that is a challenge for the two-thirds of the 4 million American stroke survivors who are left physically impaired. (Former President Gerald R. Ford suffered what was called a small stroke Wednesday, but doctors said he does not seem to be significantly impaired).
NATIONAL
February 20, 2013 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Nearly 100 medical procedures, tests and therapies are overused and often unnecessary, a coalition of leading medical societies says in a new report aimed at improving healthcare and controlling runaway costs. The medical interventions - including early caesarean deliveries, CT scans for head injuries in children and annual Pap tests for middle-aged women - may be necessary in some cases, the physician groups said. But often they are not beneficial and may even cause harm.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | PHYLLIS MENSING, Associated Press
Celebrities who become ill fare much better when they're treated as ordinary patients and don't think they're smarter than their doctors, concludes a new book by an American Medical Assn. reporter. In the book "Extraordinary Care," AMA reporter Dennis Breo says that Adolf Hitler, Elvis Presley and Howard Hughes were "impossible patients" whose health suffered because of their celebrity status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1993
Pasadena City Councilman Isaac Richard has voluntarily signed himself in to a "medical facility in the desert" after an incident last week in which a woman accused the councilman of sexual assault and cocaine use, Mayor Rick Cole said. Cole said he did not know the location of the medical facility, or for what Richard is being treated. Richard has denied to police that he used cocaine.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Although almost as many women as men die of heart disease each year, women are only half as likely to receive state-of-the-art heart attack treatment, according to a new study that researchers say suggests once again a possible treatment bias against women. The study, reported Tuesday at the annual meeting of the American Heart Assn., found that 26% of men hospitalized for heart attacks received "clot buster" drugs to restore blood flow to the heart.
NEWS
March 29, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After finding materials that have led them to suspect a Japanese religious sect may have produced nerve gas and biological toxins, authorities on Tuesday turned to the grisly possibility that the group may have buried an undetermined number of bodies at its rural complex and conducted bizarre medical treatments on its members.
NATIONAL
August 2, 2013 | By David Zucchino
MOORESVILLE, N.C. - The dark-haired girl wearing an "American Girl" T-shirt blended in with the other giggling girls flopped on their bellies and watching cartoons inside a darkened classroom. All that distinguished 11-year-old Farida was an eye patch she had decorated with purple glitter and a fancy "F" to cover her missing left eye. Four years ago, in Farida's remote village in southern Afghanistan, shrapnel from a buried Taliban bomb tore through the eye as she played outside her mud-walled home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | Maura Dolan
Several members of the California Supreme Court appeared wary Wednesday of requiring public schools to provide licensed nurses to administer insulin injections and other medications to schoolchildren. The powerful California Nurses Assn. has argued that state law requires licensed nurses to provide insulin injections and other medicines, and two lower courts have agreed. The American Diabetes Assn. appealed. During a hearing, some justices on the state high court appeared skeptical of the nurses' arguments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Aretha Franklin has canceled two scheduled performances later this month because of treatment she's undergoing for an undisclosed medical condition, the Associated Press reports. The Grammy Award-laden R&B-soul-gospel singer is forgoing her appearance May 20 with the Chicago Symphony, a “Corporate Night” fundraiser for the group, under doctor's orders, according to an announcement posted on the Chicago Symphony website. Janelle Monae will sub for Franklin at the event. The 71-year-old singer will also miss a May 26 date at the Foxwoods Resort & Casino in Connecticut.
OPINION
March 13, 2013 | By Kevin M. Dirksen and Neil S. Wenger
The 911 call last month that led to an emergency dispatcher begging workers at a Bakersfield senior living facility to perform CPR on a woman captured the attention of the public. A staff worker told the dispatcher it was against the facility's policy to intervene. The woman, Lorraine Bayless, died. It is difficult to understand how liability concerns could dissuade anyone from helping a person in distress. However, this stark event should awaken us to another question: Should we be performing CPR on 87-year-olds in a community setting such as a senior home?
NATIONAL
February 20, 2013 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Nearly 100 medical procedures, tests and therapies are overused and often unnecessary, a coalition of leading medical societies says in a new report aimed at improving healthcare and controlling runaway costs. The medical interventions - including early caesarean deliveries, CT scans for head injuries in children and annual Pap tests for middle-aged women - may be necessary in some cases, the physician groups said. But often they are not beneficial and may even cause harm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
On one side of the Los Angeles Sports Arena on Thursday morning, doctors treated patients for swollen feet, breathing problems and high blood pressure. On the other side, county health workers began enrolling them in a free coverage program in preparation for the federal healthcare overhaul. Many of the 4,800 people seeking care at the annual massive free clinic this weekend will become eligible for health insurance in 2014 when the national law takes effect. Organizers said raising awareness about the healthcare changes is crucial.
SCIENCE
October 9, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Two Americans and a Briton were awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine Monday for their work in creating "designer mice" -- experimental animals in which genes have been added or removed to test theories about the links between genes and disease. Mario R. Capecchi, 70, of the University of Utah; Oliver Smithies, 82, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and Martin J. Evans, 66, of Cardiff University in Wales will share the $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owners of a controversial Newport Beach orthopedic clinic have been charged with 25 criminal misdemeanors stemming from their use of an unorthodox and allegedly harmful treatment for muscle, joint and back disorders. Milne J. Ongley, 65, and Dr. Louis Schlom, 69, who own the Institute of Orthopedic Medicine on Superior Avenue in Newport Beach and a now-closed branch in San Diego, will plead innocent to all charges, their attorney said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2012 | Steve Lopez
I began worrying more than seven years ago, when I first brought him the violins donated by readers. Would they make my new friend, a Juilliard-trained musician who'd suffered a breakdown 35 years earlier, less safe on the streets of skid row? Would he be attacked by thieves? And that was just the beginning of the worries. As I got to know Nathaniel Anthony Ayers better, I fretted not just about whether I could protect him, but also about how to help him. Time passes; the worries never do. Uncertainty lingers constantly when you have a relationship with someone who has a severe mental illness, and watching the video this week of the Kelly Thomas beating was a reminder of how quickly things can go horribly awry.
WORLD
January 23, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Zaid al-Alayaa, Los Angeles Times
Yemen President Ali Abdullah Saleh left his battered nation Sunday for medical treatment in the U.S., asking his countrymen to forgive him for years of turmoil and vowing to return to the Arabian Peninsula state he has ruled for decades. It was not immediately evident what effect Saleh's absence from Sana would have on a government weakened by protests, resurgent Al Qaeda militants, secessionist rumblings in the south and a rebellion in the north. The president's departure was characteristic of his brash, often unpredictable nature that has long kept his friends and enemies off balance.
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